Small Cabin

Small Cabin Forum
 - Forums - Register/Sign Up - Reply - Search - Statistics -

Small Cabin Forum / General Forum / Fuel Stabilizers
Author Message
Nobadays
Member
# Posted: 17 Jun 2019 09:22
Reply 


Just wondering what others on here do when it comes to using stabilizers in your generator fuel. I use a HF Predator 3500 inverter/generator and so far have just under 300 hours on it. We are doing a lot of work around the cabin so burning through around 5 gallons of fuel a week. Written right on the generator it says to use fuel stabilizer.

At first I was adding the recommended amount of stabilizer to each gas can - I keep 17 gallons of fuel on hand, one 5 has stabilizer and is kind of the reserve can. Two fives are rotated each week along with the 2 gallon can I use for refueling. In these two 5s and the 2 gallon can I no longer add stabilizer as it isn't going to sit long.

Locally the fuel I get is 85 octane with up to 10% ethanol.

What are you doing?

Nobadays
Member
# Posted: 17 Jun 2019 09:58
Reply 


I thought I should add this... from the Denver Post: "Research several years ago from the American Petroleum Institute showed that lower air pressure at higher altitudes allows vehicles to perform as well with 85 octane as they would with 87 at lower altitudes."

My generator runs fine on the 85 octane... no pre -ignition/knocking. I do know that the manufacturer recommends 87+ octane but yo my knowledge the only sacrifice of lower octane fuels is power loss and/knocking.

Correct?

morock
Member
# Posted: 17 Jun 2019 10:00
Reply 


I use stabilizer in all my cans, but dont burn through fuel as fast as you. A tank on my outboard will last me over a month. Also I will only use 91+ octane no ethanol. All the small engine guys I talk too, says this is a must.

Nobadays
Member
# Posted: 17 Jun 2019 10:06
Reply 


I have heard too that you should use high octane fuels in small engines but not sure what backs up that claim... I found on the Briggs and Stratton site that they say 85 octane fuel is fine over 5,000'. We are at 9,500'.

Just want to do right by my generator and get the most life out of it.

silverwaterlady
Member
# Posted: 17 Jun 2019 10:33 - Edited by: silverwaterlady
Reply 


We don't use fuel stabilizers in our fuel. We go to the boat marina and buy marine fuel.
We use it in all of our small engines.

Atlincabin
Member
# Posted: 17 Jun 2019 10:38
Reply 


Detonation (pre-ignition) is the issue and the reason for higher octane fuels. Detonation occurs when the octane is lower than required for the air/fuel mix and density. At higher altitudes, there is less air (lower density), so the mixture, when compressed ends up at lower density than it does at sea level. Therefore, the higher the altitude, the lower the octane needed to prevent detonation. (note that these effects also are dependent on compression ratio - higher compression ratio requires higher octane because the mixture is more dense when compressed in the cylinder) If you go to the gas station anywhere in Colorado, regular gas is 85 octane, compared to California or Texas, where regular gas is 87 octane. They can get away with this lower octane because your car (they assume) will be at higher altitude and therefore lower pressure than it would be at sea level. At 9500 feet, you could easily get away with 83 octane fuel (if you could find it).

That's a short and dirty explanation of octane. Back to the original question: I only put stabilizer in my generator fuel at the end of the year when it will sit for several months before being fired up again. I'm not sure the rationale for putting stabilizer in all the fuel you run through a generator. If you don't want to mess with stabilizer, go to the local airport and get some avgas (100 octane), which has a lower vapor pressure and will stay stable for much longer than regular/premium auto fuel.

silverwaterlady
Member
# Posted: 17 Jun 2019 10:41 - Edited by: silverwaterlady
Reply 


www.pure-gas.org

This web site will show fuel locations that sell ethanol free gas.

NorthRick
Member
# Posted: 17 Jun 2019 11:30
Reply 


At the rate you are going through gas I wouldn't worry about stabilizer or ethanol free. When you get to where it is going to sit for a longer period of time, then I'd find some ethanol free gas and add a stabilizer and make sure you run the engine so that fuel is distributed through the fuel system.

Nobadays
Member
# Posted: 17 Jun 2019 13:43
Reply 


Thanks for all the input! Atlinecabin... thank you for the octane education, confirms what I was seeing searching online.

We are in the process of putting solar on the cabin, finger's crossed it all fires up at the end of the week when the panels go up on the roof. It has been a major project. AFTER the solar comes online I will definitely use stabilizers in the fuel as I'm pretty sure the generator will sit idle in between building projects or other high power required activities.

Thanks heaps!

Brettny
Member
# Posted: 17 Jun 2019 14:30
Reply 


NorthRick hit the nail on the head. What makes stabilizer needed is fuel sitting around. Smaller thr engine the better the fuel that needed.

I use 91 octain E0 fuel in all my 2 stroke stuff and stabilize everything just before the leaf start to drop.

toyota_mdt_tech
Member
# Posted: 17 Jun 2019 15:58
Reply 


I use only alcohol free fuels for all my power equipment, very important for the stuff that can set for some time. If your using a genie all the time, its not critical, but if its going to set over a winter, purge old fuel out with alkie free stuff, then add stabil.
To find alkie free, go to http://www.pure-gas.org
Also, a marina and airports are alkie free.
The problem with ethanol is it collects water. Water molecules are larger then fuel and will not pass through the smaller jetting and just make it blubber and cough. On yo ur carb, you can remove the fuel bowl on most and you will see the water as it sets on the bottom and doesn't mix. A womans panty hose will separate water from gas, stretch it over your funnel, pour gas through it. Be surprised to see beads of water rolling around on top of pantyhose.

Brettny
Member
# Posted: 17 Jun 2019 16:08
Reply 


Im not sure what state your in but a bunch of Stewarts in NY have 91* E0 as there standard 91* fuel.

A few years back i was in the Adirondacks and got 93*E0 fuel at a station that had every fuel you could imagine. That fuel was nearly bad just coming out of the pump. So freshness of fuel is a big issue and just because it came out of the pump dosnt mean it wasnt there for months. This fuel was yellow and smelled bad within a month.

Atlincabin
Member
# Posted: 17 Jun 2019 18:11
Reply 


Pure-gas is good, but check the dates as some of their data are really old.

In a pinch, you can separate out the ethanol from gasoline. Add about 10% water to the ethanolated fuel and shake or stir vigorously. Let it sit for about 15 minutes (maybe more depending on how big your batch is). Ethanol partitions into the water out of the gasoline. Then you need to decant off the good gasoline.

The simple test for ethanol in fuel is to put a bit of water in the bottom of a clear bottle (I usually use a gatorade type bottle, but tall, narrow bottles are best). Mark the water level on the outside. Add fuel (usually 5-10x the amount of water) and shake. Let it sit for a couple minutes and you will see the water and gasoline separate. If the water level increases, then you had ethanol in the gas. if the water level stays the same, it is pure gas. Typical 10% ethanol fuel is very obvious with this test. 1% can be determined relatively easily if you are careful with your marking.

Nobadays
Member
# Posted: 17 Jun 2019 20:52
Reply 


All good advice. Looks like there may be ethanol free fuel near me in LaJara, CO. Before winter I will make sure to run pure fuel with stabilizer through the generator.

Thank you!

ChuckDynasty
Member
# Posted: 18 Jun 2019 21:04
Reply 


PRI-G

spoofer
Member
# Posted: 18 Jun 2019 22:55
Reply 


ALWAYS ethanol free gas in All my small engines, boats , 4 wheeler, mower etc.

justincasei812
Member
# Posted: 20 Jun 2019 11:44 - Edited by: justincasei812
Reply 


I have tried rec fuel/ marine gas in some of my small engines and they just don't seem to run as well/ loss of horsepower, a little spark knock. Could it be the supplier? I run just regular gas (87 octane) in the summer in anything I am using frequently but as winter comes and I don't use things I start to use the rec fuel and do notice a difference. Will the higher grade (91 octane) last the fall/winter/ spring months when I am not using the equipment? Next time I get fuel i will start using the higher octane.

Aklogcabin
Member
# Posted: 20 Jun 2019 12:51
Reply 


Hello all, for my small engines, I use only premium gasoline . Don’t put Stabil in in mowers till fall, but I do tend to put it in ATVs and outboards regularly. I do put red heet ( isopropanol) I think, in all small engines every time I refuel.
My thought being that it is worth the cost of preventative maintenance. With the ATVs and snogos we can end up a long ways from nowhere pretty fast and I want to know that I have done all I can. I once put regular gasoline in my beautiful wife’s and my snogos once that ended up with 2 sleds not running. That could have ended really bad. .
Btw, I was able to get several 32 oz bottles of stabil off the net for $8.81 ea.
Hope you all can keep your engines running great so you can enjoy more cabin time.

NorthRick
Member
# Posted: 20 Jun 2019 17:20
Reply 


Quoting: justincasei812
I have tried rec fuel/ marine gas in some of my small engines and they just don't seem to run as well/ loss of horsepower, a little spark knock. Could it be the supplier?


You have to be careful where you buy your marine fuel. Some of it can have a lot of water in it. That could be your issue as opposed to the octane rating. You should be running whatever octane the equipment says to run and shouldn't need to go higher.

Fanman
Member
# Posted: 20 Jun 2019 17:58
Reply 


I use avgas (aviation fuel) in all my small engines. 100 octane, yeah it costs more but for the amount I use it's trivial, and it has a two year shelf life.

silverwaterlady
Member
# Posted: 20 Jun 2019 20:29
Reply 


We’ve never had a problem with water in our marine fuel.

NorthRick
Member
# Posted: 21 Jun 2019 11:38 - Edited by: NorthRick
Reply 


Quoting: silverwaterlady
We’ve never had a problem with water in our marine fuel.


Depends on the facility. Up here it is a big problem. I know guys who filled their boat up and the fuel had so much water in it that it completely filled up their fuel/water separators in a short period of time.

Bancroft bound
Member
# Posted: 23 Jun 2019 09:15
Reply 


Add to Last tank of fuel when going to sit a while.
A little extra to start season, in case of a little varnish.

Sea Foam...... the end

Nobadays
Member
# Posted: 23 Jun 2019 09:53
Reply 


We use Seafoam in our vehicles about every 4000 miles and it seems to help keep the injectors clean.

We should get our solar finished up today so I will put Stabil in my remaining gas cans. It has been two days now since we ran the generator. The inverter and lithium modules have been providing all the power we have needed after charging their with the genny.

Your reply
Bold Style  Italic Style  Underlined Style  Thumbnail Image Link  Large Image Link  URL Link           :) ;) :-( :confused: More smilies...

» Username  » Password 
Only registered users can post here. Please enter your login/password details before posting a message, or register here first.