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Small Cabin Forum / Cabin Construction / Building 8x12 cabin from 6x6 posts
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Rifraf
Member
# Posted: 25 Jan 2013 15:47 - Edited by: Rifraf
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Would it work well ?

I was considering this after I finish my small cabin im living in. I want to start a 100% off grid project.

The 6 inch thick walls would be a good barrier I would think..
The idea I had was Butt/Pass building up .. each layer would have glue between the posts, and 6" lag screws counter sunk 2" to secure the next layer to the one below it every foot ?

I have access to cheap 6x6s. I could then use structural grade sheathing to finish the inside and tie it all together even more.

Thoughts please ..
(EDIT.. I was just thinking that 4x6 might be better ? )

Thanks guys.

MtnDon
Member
# Posted: 25 Jan 2013 17:49
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Quoting: Rifraf
I have access to cheap 6x6s.


Are they green or kiln dried? Surfaced or rough?

Rifraf
Member
# Posted: 25 Jan 2013 20:05 - Edited by: Rifraf
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Well I have access to kiln dried and treated the same type you could get from a home depot type store. I thought kiln dried would be best , and just treat the side facing out.. is that the right way to go about it ? If the inside were treated it would be hard to finish properly

MtnDon
Member
# Posted: 25 Jan 2013 21:53
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PT as the bottom sill only, I would think. I'm not a log builder but IIRC there is rubber or foam gasket material that is used between the logs to seal tje space. Look up Timberlok screws. I've used them on timber retaining walls.

Timbers will often have a slightly convex face down the length. That can be a problem when trying to stack them square and solid. Running a planer down the center of the face that will be on the bottom can help with that.

Softwood is only 1.2 to 1.4 R-value per inch of thickness. Cracks and so on reduce that. The mass of the log does not help as much as some might think. Heat still leaks out or in at a rate appropriate to the R-value. And 5 1/2 inches is not a lot of wood or R-value. Just thought I'd mention that.

Your 2x4 walls in the converted shed have a higher R-value than a 6x6 timber. (5.5" x 1.4 R/inch = R 7.7. Even with the thermal breaks caused by the 2x4 wall studs the insulated 2x4 wall has a better R-value).

Rifraf
Member
# Posted: 26 Jan 2013 12:29 - Edited by: Rifraf
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Thanks Don,

I think a mini12 stove would keep it warm anyway, given its incredibly small size.

I was wondering if the 6x6 structure would stand the test of time more so than standard stick building?

I was also wonder if I could just expand the outer size of the 6x6 log plan to permit me to fur in 2x4 inner walls and insulate them if needed later on. I would like to build something that will still be standing and usable without much upkeep even for the grandchildren(my oldest child is only 13 )

Cooks Dock
Member
# Posted: 26 Jan 2013 20:22
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6X4 Eastern Cedar???? never rot!

Rifraf
Member
# Posted: 26 Jan 2013 21:55
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Thanks Cook, I actually just saw an ad on craigslist, a local logger is selling lots of cedar pretty cheap.

Tom W
Member
# Posted: 27 Jan 2013 00:17
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Sounds like your heading down my path. I have no started yet but in the planning and brain racking stage. I like all heavy wood construction and think I finally found my answer in Piece Sur Piece.

I am using 8x8 and splining between the logs and chinking the space left from the hewn corners.

MtnDon
Member
# Posted: 27 Jan 2013 00:49 - Edited by: MtnDon
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Quoting: Rifraf
I was wondering if the 6x6 structure would stand the test of time more so than standard stick building?


Longevity is derived, to a great degree, from the maintenance the structure receives over its life. The quality of the initial construction is also important, be it sticks, timbers, logs, CMU or stone. A poorly executed timber frame can fail as readily as a poorly executed stick frame, IMO.

If trouble free longevity is a desired goal, start with a proper full perimeter foundation footing. No shortcuts; shortcuts bite you in the a$$ later.

Wolfwasp
Member
# Posted: 21 Jun 2017 05:47
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All good advice but I would argue a few points.
I built a 10x10 sauna with my wife back in 1980. Some of our friends helped initially when we poured the pad. No cement mixer, no running water. The cement was mixed in big wheel barrows with people carrying buckets of water from the lake.
We forgot to fill inside the homemade forms after tamping so the floor ended up a foot thick. That was a mistake don't do that.
I am going to build one again soon after all this time and I am going to do it the same way except I will take my time and make it a lot nicer, and bigger. I have the time now.
But that whole R value thing irks me. I know what the book says and it is factually correct. Every building code uses the same information and you better comply or you don't get the permit.
I didn't need a permit when I built mine and there were no forums so I bought 2 cases of 12 inch spikes, a sledge, and a chainsaw and built a building with a wall across the middle on the inside separating the sauna and the change room. Lined the sauna with vapor barrier and had a sauna because we needed one! and all the plastic drooped bad. So I nailed scrap lumber all over the place and we used it for that first winter. Then I got some rough cut cedar boards and finished the inside. Needless to say we were broke back then.
That was and still is an amazing building. 38 years and it hasn't changed one bit. The new owner jazzed it up a bit but the structure will be there for a very long time.
We built trusses and put a steep pitch roof that extended about six feet on the front and about 4 foot on the back. We just extended the top timbers out to where we wanted. No real plan.
"eye sweet" I think they call it.
It had about 3 feet of overhang on the sides and the snow just fell off of it.
So we lived in a stick frame cabin and had a solid timber sauna.
What I want to say about R value is;
When we got home from an overnight trip to town which we did about once a month, the stick frame building was frozen. Inside and out.
The sauna was still warm! Two days later....
IMO solid wood is better to live in than stick frame. It might technically be less R value, but it absorbs heat and has huge mass and it loses its heat slower, or it stores more of it or some damn thing. If you live where there is harsh weather solid wood is much friendlier to human comfort. It stays warm.
I have to look hard to find a picture of mine. I will post it when I find it.
I am really happy I found this forum. I am getting ready to build again and look forward to trading ideas and learning some new tricks hopefully before I start in a few months.
Did I mention it was easy? It was easy.
There are some pictures on this site that look a lot like what I built. Different dimensions. I'll find that picture.

bc thunder
Member
# Posted: 21 Jun 2017 09:55
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I'm still very happy with mine.
IMG_0096.JPG
IMG_0096.JPG


Rowjr
Member
# Posted: 3 Jan 2018 06:43
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MAD MAX
Member
# Posted: 9 Jan 2018 18:02
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There are things that a solid wall has that a frame built wall wont have. The first thing is that there is no substitute for the thickness of the wall This is called thermal mass. If you were to put a thin layer of say a foam insulation on the inner wall then cover it with say a thin rustic paneling it would be the warmest building you were ever in. And don't forget to insulate the roof. There are square log hand hewn buildings in Norway that are solid as a rock that are 300 years old.

DaveBell
Member
# Posted: 9 Jan 2018 18:16
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Quoting: Rifraf
Would it work well ?


That (5.5x1.8) will give ya an R-Value of 10.
Add 2x2's as furring strips for your rustic paneling and closed cell spray foam 1.5 inches, your wall R-Value should be around 20.

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