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Small Cabin Forum / Cabin Construction / Easy and Cheap Log Cabin
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meditech
# Posted: 16 Feb 2012 16:52
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hey yall, looking for some more detailed info on lumber logs. great idea for my bug out shelter. thanks

bukhntr
# Posted: 18 Feb 2012 21:45
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just wondering if you have had any problems with rot or insect on the untreated lumber. I like the idea for a cabin I am considering. We will be off the ground on pillars but the exposed seams of the three layers give me some concern for moisture trapment

Thanks great idea

Stoney
Member
# Posted: 19 Feb 2012 07:25
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bukhntr,

I haven't had any problem with rot or insects. I filled the seams with construction adhesive to prevent air infiltration and as an incect barrier.
I used stain on the exterior walls for color and to protect the wood just like on any other house or barn.

spicyacres
Member
# Posted: 19 Feb 2012 09:53
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Quoting: bukhntr
just wondering if you have had any problems with rot or insect on the untreated lumber. I like the idea for a cabin I am considering. We will be off the ground on pillars but the exposed seams of the three layers give me some concern for moisture trapment


I was thinking that in addition to the adhesive between the layers, some silicone along the joints would seal the system up real nice.

JoshG
Member
# Posted: 19 Feb 2012 12:52
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What a great design! I like the inter-locking design. I know there are full logs already available with a tongue and groove inter-lock, but for the DIY'er, this is an excellent option. I would also think that any future repairs needed to the exterior would be much simpler by only having to replace the exterior facade, versus having to replace an entire log. Of course, with a quality exterior stain and regular maintainance, that shouldn't be an issue, but should the situation arrise.....

Are you "chinking" the exterior? I would think with your interlocking design, and being that they are also glued together, that would not be necessary, but the issue of moisture was brought up, so I am wondering what your thoughts are on that.

Stoney
Member
# Posted: 19 Feb 2012 13:24
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JoshG,

Like I stated earlier, I did "Chink" the cracks with construction adhesive. This is just a little extra to keep out insects and to eliminate any possible drafts. I think that the stain is adaquate protection for any moisture issues as it would be on any other log cabin.

JoshG
Member
# Posted: 19 Feb 2012 14:00
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Sorry, I missed that initially. I now see that you already addressed that. I am new to the site, and have spent a lot of time the past couple of days reading many of the different members' ideas. This place is a wealth of knowledge. I have built two cabins so far (well 3 actually, one is built in my backyard with leftover materials from the other two), but mine were rough cut 6"x8" red pine timbers, stacked, glued and screwed, and then chinked with Log Jam. They turned out nice, but I really like your design, with less chance for any air infiltration.

shootinblanks
Member
# Posted: 28 Feb 2012 20:04
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Hi there, just wondering if adding a 2'' ridged foam board as a center, been considered. This would increase the "R" value and reduce the weight. Also I know it may add to the cost but I'm thinking about using a ceder board on the outside to reduce the maintenace. I do know the cost will be higher but may pay off in the long run.

Your thaughts please and again great idea.

JoshG
Member
# Posted: 28 Feb 2012 20:19
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Shootinblanks, I would think that would take away from the structural integrity of the building. Also, the 2x8 does have thermal mass, not sure what the trade off would be between that and the R-value of 2" foam, but I would think it wouldn't be significant. Maybe the OP can shed a little light on this, but those are my thoughts.

Stoney
Member
# Posted: 28 Feb 2012 21:36
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I have to agree with JoshG on this one.

shootinblanks
Member
# Posted: 28 Feb 2012 21:42
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Noted....Thanks guys

Liam2833
# Posted: 27 Mar 2012 15:34
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Thanks for the posting. Very interesting and well thought out. You mentioned an ebay posting "lumber log structures" that you would keep there for some time. I think it is gone since it is now 2012. Can I get a copy somehow for an upcoming garage i want to build, and will I give you all the credit for the idea. Thanks Liam

Strider
Member
# Posted: 28 Mar 2012 07:43
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Awesome concept Stoney.

Has anyone else built with this method yet? Any reports?

I only found this thread last night and, if it works as suggested, it's a bloody awesome idea! It seems to be the perfect choice I had been searching for to build a workshop/barn addition to our future log house.

It almost sounds too good to be true, for my situation at least, so I'd appreciate input from anyone else that has tried it.

What about you Stoney... anything to add as time goes by: things that went well, issues that arose, anything you would do differently/better, etc.

Cheers

sahaney
# Posted: 11 Jul 2012 10:30
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Stoney,

How's it holding up, now that it's been up for a while. I'm thinking of building a rustic cabin like this and thaught I'd check. It sounds like a great idea.

exsailor
Member
# Posted: 12 Jul 2012 11:15
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Hi Stoney,
I have read your thread a couple times. It is a good idea, appears easy to build, with an aesthetic appearance. You have done good Job overall. I haven't figured out exactly how the walls stay plumb, but the interlocking tongues, butt and pass construction working together with doors and window frames probably do that. I like your Idea for putting vertical 2x2 up the walls to add insulation. It would also allow wiring to be hidden. If the climate was really extreme use 2x4 for even more insulation room. Not that it needs it, but the vertical runs would add more strength and double lock the walls together. I will be sending you an email this afternoon.

Sustainusfarm
Member
# Posted: 12 Jul 2012 13:01
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Doesn't sound very "green" to me as stated at the beginning of this thread?? The wood has to be handled and shipped multiple times..then the use of all that goop to make it stick together....not convinced yet...

mcw4rosy
Member
# Posted: 16 Jul 2012 21:27
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Stoney - great idea. I'm a hobbiest furniture builder. I can build anything. With regards to cabin building I've thought of a similar constructing idea, BUT you finished it for me. THANKS. As far as "green": Who cares how many times it's been handled? I wouldn't spend a moment thinking about negative comments. If ideas like yours were never put to use - we'd still be rubbing two sticks together. I read so many "Purist's" comments from furniture builders. Let them work by candle light. I have to work for my money. And aren't we all using a computer to access this forum?

Anonymous
# Posted: 5 Sep 2012 23:21
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stoney r u still selling your log pamplets?

Anonymous
# Posted: 20 Sep 2012 23:08
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I would be interested in a copy of the log pamplet as well please. I couldnt find it on ebay, and yes I know this thread is a couple of years old. But I had to try and check because this design is simply genius.

OwenChristensen
Member
# Posted: 21 Sep 2012 07:07
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Why not just stack 2x8's on each side of a framed and insulated wall?

Owen

VC_fan
Member
# Posted: 21 Sep 2012 18:59
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My question also ... be glad to hear opinions.

preventec47
# Posted: 27 Sep 2012 09:04
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What if as an extreme gesture of cost savings only one layer of
2x8s or 2x10s or even 2x12s were used like a picnic table top
and then 2x4s or maybe 2x2s were laid vertically and attached
to the larger boards? This could make a very strong wall and the
corner attachment at right angles to the other walls would keep
them straight and vertical. Sure a lot of heat performance would
be lost but if the structure is only used during fair weather it
would not matter. Indeed the concept is appealing aesthetically
but I just want to see the over all costs compared to the more
traditional 2x4 framed wall with T-111 exterior plywood and plywood on the interior with or without insulation etc.

Stoney
Member
# Posted: 23 Oct 2012 09:57
Reply 


Owen,
If you just stacked 2 by 8's on each side of a framed wall you would just be getting log siding and would lose the benefits and cost savings of building with my method.
The main purpose of my method is to make the building easier and to save money over other log cabin methods.
Regarding my booklet, it is still available at my email address.

Thanks

Anonymous
# Posted: 29 Oct 2012 00:09
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Hey Stoney, I've been building houses for over 30 years now. I have been looking for a way to build a weekend cabin for my family. After countless hours and days of designing and thinking....HOLY CRAP.... what did I just find on the internet tonight? Yep, a simple answer to my problem. Good job, good brain, All Hail Stoney! Thanks

Anonymous
# Posted: 6 Dec 2012 10:49
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Stoney, Like the person above me, I have been desperately been looking for a way to build a cabin for the fam. What a blessing finding this thread!! Kudos my friend! My hats off to ya for a fantastic idea. The only thing I'm still unsure of is...

how did you intersect another interior wall to the main wall shell?

I've ran a few scenarios in SketchUp, and am just not sure of which method would be best.. any thoughts would be greatly appreciated! Thank you soooo much for sharing with us all! The world needs more selfless people like yourself! God Bless!! Thank you!

Stoney
Member
# Posted: 6 Dec 2012 12:24
Reply 


This is a very good question.
I would attach an interior wall by nailing a 2 x 2 vertically on the interior of the outside wall.
Build the logs with the center board two inches shorter so that it will fit around the 2 by 2. Then just nail into the end of the log to secure it to the 2 by 2.

Anonymous
# Posted: 6 Dec 2012 17:07
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Perfect!! Thank you so much!! You 'da man!!

Here's another for ya....

24' X 36' cabin using this method.. how would you attach loft floor joists to the top plate? Joist Hangers? Or on top of the plate? Maybe Notch out the wall for them to "rest" in?

What's your take?

Thank you again!

Stoney
Member
# Posted: 7 Dec 2012 07:00
Reply 


Either of these methods will work but for ease of building I would rest them on the top plate. This way you don't lose any head room on the first floor or have to add an extra log to the wall height to maintain an eight foot ceiling on the first floor.
They can be nailed along side your rafters and into the top plate.
On your first question, I assumed that you wanted log interior walls. You could also build stud walls and just nail them into the logs of the outer walls. This method would be easier for closets. You could also use a combination of both if desired.

hakalugi
Member
# Posted: 17 Dec 2012 22:15
Reply 


Hi Stoney,

I like this idea for a few reasons:

1) interior is 'done' (if one wants a wood / log-esq look)
2) no sheets of osb/ply for walls, rather easier to handle (1 man job) 2x8's, in this method max length will be 8'
3) seems like i could get this up and build a weather tight structure (quick) then on visits when we're there visiting, I could do the stonework I want for my exterior.

I have a question though. I can't do slab. It is unlikely I could even do a footer, since we can't get a ready-mix truck up to our site. So the logical method is post holes and sonotubes with dimensional 2x framing for the floor deck. But since I will have help for the post digging (into very rocky soil) these guys would be bringing up the 6x6 posts and after visiting the site mentioned they could bring 20' or 24' posts for the same costs (hourly hauling). So I'm considering taking my 6x6 posts up "balloon framing" style up through the "floor decking".

"your wall" would sit on the decking between the posts.

Questions: What are your thoughts about creating a tongue on the sides of the posts -shown with the 1.5 x 1.5 in the attachment on the sides of my 6x6 post, so your middle 2x8 is shorter? What if I want to extend the "inside 2x8" so that it laps the post. This way only "untreated" lumber is in the living area?

As part of "building the shell" I'd either tvvek over the outside 2x8 or put up 2" insulation board on the outside of "your wall" - the insulation will run 'between' the posts. So I'll have some thermal bridging at the posts, but being at 8' o/c and being 7" of wood (1.5" + 5.5") it's not the worst situation.

what say you? would the 'common seam' of the butt-joining of the innermost 2x8 on the post be a problem? 2x2 tounges on the sides of the posts?

Also, anyone try this without nailing the inside 2x8 and doing only clamps, adhesives and 4" nails from the 'outside' direction pointing in? [my wife's not keen on seeing nailheads on the inside]
stoneywall-on-post
stoneywall-on-post


Stoney
Member
# Posted: 18 Dec 2012 07:38
Reply 


hakalugi,

There shouldn't be any problem with building on posts. However I am concerned with your method of attaching them.
With your idea, most of the weight will be on one side of the post and not directly over the post. My suggestion would be to shorten your posts and set your logs directly on top. This way the weight is centered over the posts and the weight is evenly distributed.
Also your method of attaching to the post seems weak to me. The inner boards would be toe nailed to the post or some sort of joist hangers would be necessary to support the weight. I am not convinced that the 1.5 by 1.5 would support the weight long term.
If you decide to place your logs on top of the posts, you can then build your floor within this first course of logs and attach them with joist hangers.
I also considered nailing the logs together only from the outside. I found out that four inch nails were hard to find and the engineer that approved my drawings said that they had to be nailed on both sides so that is what I built. Four inch screws would also have been expensive.

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