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cabingal3
Member
# Posted: 21 Jan 2011 04:12
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and Gary O.u forgot to mention something else...its going to be fun!! cabingal3

Gary O
Member
# Posted: 23 Jan 2011 21:12 - Edited by: Gary O
Reply 


.....and it was.

Did some slag burning, and just plain enjoyed every single moment.

Some pix
slag burn
slag burn
old slag burn tender
old slag burn tender


Gary O
Member
# Posted: 23 Jan 2011 21:46
Reply 


MORE WINTER PIX
NATURE SETS THE TABLE
NATURE SETS THE TABLE
SKIP TO M'LOO
SKIP TO M'LOO
OUR NEWLY AQUIRED MEADOW
OUR NEWLY AQUIRED MEADOW


Gary O
Member
# Posted: 23 Jan 2011 21:53
Reply 


EVIDENCE OF WINTER VISITATIONS
OLD TRACKS
OLD TRACKS
FRESH TRACKS
FRESH TRACKS
MORE FRESH TRACKS
MORE FRESH TRACKS


Timberjack
Member
# Posted: 24 Jan 2011 08:04
Reply 


Mr. Gary, what is "slag"? What we refer to as slag down south is a type of crushed gray rock used for roads and driveways. Also, what animal made those tracks? Doesn't look like anything we have down here. Looks awesome, wish we had snow like that.......

Gary O
Member
# Posted: 24 Jan 2011 09:22
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Quoting: Timberjack
what is "slag"?


That's a term I ignorantly used (and borrowed from those just as ignorant) when the term s/be slash.

In any event, we piled dead falls in late summer, and tarped them so they'd stay dry during snow/burning season.

So, slash burning would be the better term.
Thanks for bringing that to my attention, TJ.

When we arrived, a snow bunny was the welcoming committee (must have drawn the short straw).....some of the fresh tracks are the hare's, but lotsa deer, and 'other'.
The track beside (I think) Mr Rabbit's is my number 12 boot....that I know for sure.

Cabi3 wanted to draw a bead on Mr Rabbit, but I had to back her off, since we had to remain on task, due to time limitations.

bushbunkie
Member
# Posted: 24 Jan 2011 16:34
Reply 


You have a wonderful way with words, Hattie.

Gary O
Member
# Posted: 24 Jan 2011 21:51
Reply 


More winter pix
a couple taken of our newly acquired junk camper (tree fall mishap) on the adjoining land we purchased
meadow's edge
meadow's edge
camper junk
camper junk
camper junk (the good side)
camper junk (the good side)


Gary O
Member
# Posted: 24 Jan 2011 21:57 - Edited by: Gary O
Reply 


There really is a well on our new property.....

No info on it yet, but it looks like a hand pump was attached at one time, otherwise why the little stand?

Gonna drop a line this summer for depth. If not more than 30-40' then I'll attach a hand pump, prime, and test
newly found well
newly found well
at_the_winter_cabin_.jpg
at_the_winter_cabin_.jpg


Rob_O
# Posted: 24 Jan 2011 22:41
Reply 


Quoting: Gary O
a couple taken of our newly acquired junk camper (tree fall mishap) on the adjoining land we purchased


I think you're going to need a bigger chainsaw

Gary O
Member
# Posted: 24 Jan 2011 22:48
Reply 


Quoting: Rob_O
I think you're going to need a bigger chainsaw

As we anglers say...'a well placed Dupont spinner will do the trick'.....

elkdiebymybow
Member
# Posted: 26 Jan 2011 01:49
Reply 


Gary O,

Congrats on the new property. I love the simplicity of your place and the pictures with the warm glow of light reaching to the outside looks so inviting. What a neat place! Good Job!

~Elk

Gary O
Member
# Posted: 26 Jan 2011 19:51
Reply 


Thank you Elk
I'd sure love to attempt a log structure. Yours and others really inspire me.

bushbunkie
Member
# Posted: 4 Feb 2011 20:36
Reply 


Gary,
Your first cabin looks great.
Excellent idea using the large glass doors...of course now I hate you, because my wife saw it and said :"why didn't you think of that?" HA!

How's the new cabin project progressing??

Gary O
Member
# Posted: 4 Feb 2011 23:34
Reply 


Hi Bush-

The doors were a stroke of luck on craigslist.
I've always liked the features of french doors (width, light, aethetics) but the good ones have never been in my budget.
$50 on the list, retail $800-$900.
Darn near lost 'em when I picked 'em up. Strapped 'em down to my flat bed trailer and, in my glee of acquisition, must have missed a step in securing. Half way home people were honking and gesturing. I almost gave them the 'I think you're number one sign' (in thinking they thought I was going too slow), but pulling over to let them by I noticed the doors were actually dragging behind the trailer....and I was a onetime truck driver......the very nice, elderly couple that had been blasting their horn engaged their emergency flashers and waved traffic as I sheepishly re-mounted the framed doors......

This spring/summer s/be telling as to progress.
Right now I'm getting a small manuscript published, but s/be unfettered by April, and off to dig the foundation.
If we can get the well going, that'll play a big role in determining what type of footing, etc.

The fun never ends, aey?

Gary O'

Gary O
Member
# Posted: 5 Feb 2011 00:19
Reply 


bushbunkie
Speaking of wells, how deep is yours, and any priming issues?
Gary O'

bushbunkie
Member
# Posted: 5 Feb 2011 09:00
Reply 


The well is 116 ft deep.
Apparently, if the water level comes up to within 20 feet of the surface, hand pumps are doable.
Ours only came up to 25 ft of the surface...but still worked fine.
Our well driller added a foot valve ? to help with the priming.
I can go away for weeks...come back and with two pumps of the handle I have water.
Because of our winters, you have to pull the pump off and the 20 - 25 ft. of plastic pipe.
Did it for the first time this October...took 10 minutes to do it...rolled the plastic pipe into a circle...duct taped and stored in the outhouse for the winter with the pump.

RnR
Member
# Posted: 18 Feb 2011 16:17
Reply 


Great Pics Gary O! I laughed at your door story above. I appreciate your honesty!

RnR

Gary O
Member
# Posted: 18 Feb 2011 21:13
Reply 


RnR
Good to see you pop back in to the forum.
Your class gives a good balance to my crass.

Any more thoughts on Inga and brood?
Since we aquired the adjoining property, we're thinking some hearty free range biddies might enhance things one day.

BlaineHill
Member
# Posted: 3 Mar 2011 19:23
Reply 


Gary O',

I was looking at your posts on this thread from last August 15 &16. I really like the looks of your floor and I had a couple of questions.

I am considering using 2x6 T&G flooring for my cabin. I think it looks great and is much less expensive than the plywood subfloor, felt paper, and pre-finished nail down harwood alternative. Also, I like the idea of using it as a loft floor with cedar beam supports as I think it will have a nice look from below also.

Anyway, I was wondering about your experiances with the pine floor. Did you use a polyurethane floor sealer? Did you stain it? Has there been any durability issues with the soft pine?

Gary O
Member
# Posted: 3 Mar 2011 20:11
Reply 


Hi BH

I'd think 2x6 T&G would be great.
I've built both ways w/ply and 2x6.
Haven't used T&G or car decking, as the T&G has been something less than desirable at the Big Box stores in my area.
We went with KD spf 2x6 and am quite happy with it.
If I was in rain country I'd probably have gone with treated for the floor too.
24" OC gives me the assurance of a solid floor, but I tend to overbuild.........
In not using T&G, we laid down thin ply over lay, and stain, so I'm not much help there.

Boy, I'd think a loft floor/ceiling situation would be great aesthetically and strength wise.

As for durability, keep your spike heels at home.

Hope some of this helps.

Happy building

Gary O'

Gary O
Member
# Posted: 20 Mar 2011 18:10 - Edited by: Gary O
Reply 


OK, so I enclosed the breezeway to my sheds in order to store my daughter's possessions, when her and her little darlings stayed with us.
I put hinges on one wall for egress, and when my daughter moved all her precious treasures (actually I gleefully loaded my trailer with it and beat her to her new door......bruhahahahaha), I decided to keep it enclosed, now housing my miter saw and a few rakes and handled tools.
However, cabi suggested we incorporate this feature into our new build.
(Another reason she is my building partner)
In seeing the bunkies with screened in porches and decks, and the immediate square footage gained, I'm going to pursue this for at least one wall (maybe two).
Once raised up, one could enclose with temporary half walls and screens for at least the summer, and drop the door down when vacant.
It may or may not work for what we are going to do for our next cabin, but seems it would be a money saver and room increaser for those considering an 8 x 8, or 10 x 12 but wanting a bit more space, especially in reading about the max size dictated by the local principalities.

Thoughts anyone?
walldoor_down.jpg
walldoor_down.jpg
walldoor_up.jpg
walldoor_up.jpg


soundandfurycabin
Member
# Posted: 21 Mar 2011 19:55
Reply 


I've been thinking about security shutters as well.... a large barn door or something that swings out of the way....not sure yet. I will install chicken wire under the siding to thwart anyone who tries to break in with a chainsaw.

Gary O
Member
# Posted: 31 Mar 2011 21:58
Reply 


Quoting: soundandfurycabin
I've been thinking about security shutters as well

Yeah, that would slow 'em down.
I was thinking more in line with relief of the local dictates of max square footage, like 8 x 8, and immediately double size, at the same time, make things a lot more affordable......and possibly more secure.
hinged_wall.jpg
hinged_wall.jpg


Gary O
Member
# Posted: 11 Apr 2011 22:48
Reply 


Quoting: Gary O
Gonna drop a line this summer for depth. If not more than 30-40' then I'll attach a hand pump, prime, and test

Headin' down to the property this weekend.
Hope to find the depth by runnin' a tube down the pipe.
Taking some collars and nipples to match hook up.
Need some input on pitcher pump hook up.
Been searching the web, looking for any tricks to the trade in priming..........

BadgersHollow
Member
# Posted: 11 Apr 2011 23:11
Reply 


Gary, I think we are nearly neighbors. But, I'm on the west side of the HW.

Gary O
Member
# Posted: 12 Apr 2011 08:31
Reply 


BadgersHollow
Hidee Ho neighbor!

Wife and I often wondered what was on the west side, as not so many in roads to speak of.....

Been there long?

Are you an Oregonian, or out of state owner?

Been a relative mild winter...2-3' snow accumed, mixed with sporadic melt offs.

Welcome to the forum, and the neighborhood!

Gary O'

Just
Member
# Posted: 12 Apr 2011 09:39
Reply 


Gary O

my friend the well guy sayes a hand pump will only pump down to about 20 ft. after that you would need a jerk rod hand pump.[work down to 120 ft. ] he said to hook up a hand bump you would need 35 ft. 1 in. hose ,a sanitary well seal , a foot velve , clamps & fittings to attach the hose to the pump and foot velve,a wooden box to mount the pump to at a proper height. the well seal is a rubber plug with a outer diameter = to the inside of your well casing,and a inside hole of 1 1\4 in. + 2 steal plates to compress the rubber.

Just
Member
# Posted: 12 Apr 2011 09:43
Reply 


O ya to prime the pump just poor water in the top !!

Gary O
Member
# Posted: 12 Apr 2011 09:56
Reply 


Quoting: Just
the well guy sayes a hand pump will only pump down to about 20 ft.

Yeah, been readin' that. However, I've also been told (by those that have 'em) that they can draw from 30'.
The sites I've seen show jerk rod pumps at around $200-$300.
If my tube hits water at 25-30' I'm going to invest in the $50-$100 pitcher pump.

Thanks for the info Just.
Keep it comin'

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