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Small Cabin Forum / General Forum / Do alternatives to the usual log building schools exist at all?
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Rdsrds123
Member
# Posted: 30 May 2022 07:03
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Hello there, occasionally I do internet searches for log cabin/house building schools and always get the usual results. These are well known sites that come up again and again no matter how a search is preformed. Mostly they are way far away from everybody in very remote areas like in Alaska, Canadian NW, or are not quite what I am hoping to find. I'm interested in something like might be a Noah Bradley type style of cabin but no place I can find does this. I know NB has online resources but no actual school where you go and do some building on an actual cabin. I suppose this type of cabin would be common in the middle Atlantic, west to the Mississippi states, historically, and would be where I would expect to find a school of some sort teaching this style of construction, but I can find nothing at all. Can someone help help me out here with some suggestions for schools in this area, or some different search terms? Thank you so much.

frankpaige
Member
# Posted: 30 May 2022 18:09
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Why does it have to be a school as such? Could you locate a company that builds that type and ask for a job? If you were going to school you would be paying. Tell them what you are looking for and maybe come to some kind of agreement?
Luck

Rdsrds123
Member
# Posted: 30 May 2022 18:31
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Just a couple of weeks to gain instruction, thank you.

ICC
Member
# Posted: 30 May 2022 19:22
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Do you mean the old Appalachian style of chinked square log as pictured?
appalachia style log
appalachia style log


Rdsrds123
Member
# Posted: 30 May 2022 19:27
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Yeah, like that one pictured...but smaller. Squared hewn logs. Chinked between log courses. The debarked round logs are what you call log cabins built today. Maybe a restoration school instead of build new school? Lots of these cabins come up for sale on FB.

DaveBell
Moderator
# Posted: 30 May 2022 19:55
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Google/Pictures 1800's log cabin for sale

toyota_mdt_tech
Member
# Posted: 30 May 2022 21:08
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Quoting: Rdsrds123
Hello there, occasionally I do internet searches for log cabin/house building schools and always get the usual results. These are well known sites that come up again and again no matter how a search is preformed.



Have you considered the Log Home Builders Association, ie the LHBA?

You used to have to fly into Seattle area and then they moved to Vegas and was a 3 day class. But it gave you a lifetime membership and with it comes a lifetime of resources and information.

I did a local log home building class and it was the same procedure as the LHBA, but the LHBA seems to be the gold standard for several reasons.

You can now become an LHBA member and complete the course all online. I did it, was great, quite a few videos. Good this is, I can revisit those videos anytime for the rest of my life and watch them over and over. They cover all aspects and include resources and tricks to acquire free logs from the USFS etc.

ICC
Member
# Posted: 30 May 2022 21:36
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Doesn't the LHBA only do butt n pass? That is quite different from the traditional squared hewn chink style.

I do like the squared hewn chink style but all I have ever seen is restoration of structures and dismantling and reassembling, usually with the dismantle & reassembly including relocation. The picture cabin was two separate building, dismantled, moved and reassembled into one new building. Old chestnut timbers originally harvested 1840 or thereabouts.

Rdsrds123
Member
# Posted: 31 May 2022 06:00
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Just looked at LHBA. Using the word association, I would think this is an entity that represents a collection of similar groups related to building log homes for profit or even non-profit. What it appears to be is a company that is marketing it's own products. You can get the whole online package for only $12000 and be on your way to a mortgage free cabin built in their style. But wait! If you order now you can get their entire online package for only $497. This is a discount of $11,500! Nuff said.

Rdsrds123
Member
# Posted: 31 May 2022 06:13
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I'm sitting here wondering how LHBA can use the word association in it's name. Perhaps all their individual online log home construction videos taken (and bought)together make up an association of items related together to form a complete package?

Rdsrds123
Member
# Posted: 31 May 2022 07:52
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I do think that in the end, before building, the LHBA information is something to get and study. There is much there that would be used no matter what kind of log structure is being built. It's just their packaging that troubles me. But still, doing some actual building at a school and information such as this probably are what I need. Thanks!

toyota_mdt_tech
Member
# Posted: 31 May 2022 08:03 - Edited by: toyota_mdt_tech
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Quoting: Rdsrds123
I do think that in the end, before building, the LHBA information is something to get and study. There is much there that would be used no matter what kind of log structure is being built. It's just their packaging that troubles me. But still, doing some actual building at a school and information such as this probably are what I need



They actually did the schools, but covid forced them to do the online version. It was perfect for me because I never was able to get 3 days off and that was 1800 then.

I am a life member, bought the complete log home plans, the material is theirs designed by them, they have a unique system that makes it easy to do, no settling of the logs. They do everything from foundation to roof and plus they have lots of other resources. They have been around for many decades.

Dont beat yourself up over the word association, get over their packaging, dont let that little issue stop you from learning the simplest, easiest method of building a log home for yourself.

I certainly wished I got mine for $497 bucks.

toyota_mdt_tech
Member
# Posted: 31 May 2022 08:15 - Edited by: toyota_mdt_tech
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Quoting: Rdsrds123
I'm sitting here wondering how LHBA can use the word association in it's name.


A simple search should answer your question. I did a duckduckgo search and got the skinny right from the IRS.

In general, an association is a group of persons banded together for a specific purpose. To qualify under section 501(a) of the Code, the association must have a written document, such as articles of association, showing its creation. At least two persons must sign the document, which must be dated.

Specific purpose could be to teach people how to build log homes? Just a guess.

Rdsrds123
Member
# Posted: 31 May 2022 09:25
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I do think COVID infections caused some closures. Maybe they will reopen. Casually surfing cabin building a while back, though not paying attention, I think I saw a number of people offering classes. Some larger places just stopped entirely and will not reopen. They can still be easily found searching.

toyota_mdt_tech
Member
# Posted: 31 May 2022 14:50
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I did do a log home class about 5 yrs prior to the LHBA one and was basically a condensed version of the LHBA, in fact, he was an LHBA member. His was a one day, it took all day, they fed us lunch. It was nice and we got a booklet or overview for reference.

The LHBA when changes are made, is incorporated in the new video, so its all kept current.

You can watch the same video again and pick up info you missed before.

I was always curious how it was done, now I know, but not sure if I will build one. I do have plenty of acreage and timber to build one. But no longer a spring chicken.

Their method is pretty quick, the butt-n-pass corners etc. How they pin them to avoid settling and the trick to chinking using mortar.

Its a good investment. Look at members photos, all gorgeous homes.

Cowracer
Member
# Posted: 31 May 2022 15:10 - Edited by: Cowracer
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Don't know where you are at, but Eash Sales in Shipshewana Indiana has some really nice cabins for sale.


Link Here

Tim

Rdsrds123
Member
# Posted: 1 Jun 2022 15:38
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Can't find a single traditional log cabin building school...nada. Timber framing classes are easy to find. That's about as close as I can find ol. Looks to be a wide open nich for someone to offer such a school or even one for maintenance.

toyota_mdt_tech
Member
# Posted: 3 Jun 2022 08:37
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Wow, I have done 2 classes, one in person at logcabinsfromscratch.com and the lhba.com

Malamute
Member
# Posted: 5 Jun 2022 11:49 - Edited by: Malamute
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If i can make a suggestion, buy some decent books with pictures of the type cabins you like, and get a few log building books. Study, see a few in person at historical locations, and just go do it. Maybe do a small yard shed as a practice project.

I think people tend to overthink it all. Yes, knowing some stuff helps, but log building is not some mysterious dark art known only to master craftsmen, the vast majority of old cabins were built by people with little or no knowledge other than what they saw nearby.

I looked at the LHBA stuff some time ago. No personal disrespect for anyone, but its NOT log building in any traditional sense. Its stacking logs and pinning them with rebar. Theres a reason they dont want or allow anyone with actual log building experience attending their stuff, they dont want questions or comments from people that know what actual log building is about making them look like they dont know anything about log building. Anyway, if anyone is OK with all that, great, rock on, but I dont think its related in any way to what the original poster is looking for or likes.

I like traditional rockies frontier type cabins. I bought a pile of logs and built one because i needed a place to live. Its just not that hard to do. You learn to fix or get over your mistakes, and most people never notice them anyway. Look at some actual old time cabins once you know some stuff and your ideas of them being built by master craftsmen quickly evaporate. They are still very fine and functional cabins, despite not being perfectly executed examples of furniture grade craftsmanship.

The general understanding in log building is that logs should be allowed to settle, its not difficult to do. You can get away with not allowing for settling, especially in smaller places, but it can put stress on various things when they can't settle. Its not the end of the world to ignore, but its also not rocket surgery to take care of.

Anyway, if you like that type of traditional eastern type log building as mentioned earlier, please dont feel its beyond the average persons ability or you cant do it without some special instruction. Again, most old time cabins were not built by master craftsmen, they were built by average people that needed a place to live. Corner notches are not voodoo or anything overly complicated by any means. Theres various types, figure out which ones you like best, start messing with some smaller log scraps and figure it out.

Rdsrds123
Member
# Posted: 5 Jun 2022 12:04
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Thank you for the encouragment

gcrank1
Member
# Posted: 5 Jun 2022 12:33
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Ive considered using landscape timbers for a small utility building but never got to it.
Once saw a cabin built of telephone poles a guy bought 'right' somewhere.
Not having to prep the logs sure seems like a good start to me.

Malamute
Member
# Posted: 5 Jun 2022 12:36
Reply 


You can do this.

Do you have a copy of The Foxfire Book? he first one has quite a bit of info on square hewn log work with dovetail corners. Theres also pics online of the Foxfire Museum that turned up in a google search that has pictures of the cabins there, if youre close enough you could go see them in person. Ive always loved looking at old cabins, Ive seen hundreds over the years. You start realizing that in a particular area, many were built with similar styles, even when the style was a bit weird or quirky. Ive seen it firsthand, the first cabin I bought, the people said they "went and looked at so-and-so's cabin and did it like his was". They had never done any log work whatsoever, and it was reflected in the cabin, but it was there and was fine for the most part.

I realized this was a common thing, that most old cabins were somewhere between crude and fair in actual execution, and the highly detailed log mansions often seen today arent really very representative of old cabins and log work. Not to take anything away from modern log work, ive seen some awesome work, its just different than old stuff for the most part. It sounds like you prefer a certain traditional style. Dont give up on it.

I had no plan, little experience beyond having looked at many books and old cabins and helped do a crude barn structure. I took a single picture from the book "Cache Lake Country" and said "How hard can it be?"

This was my blueprint,

Malamute
Member
# Posted: 5 Jun 2022 12:43
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Im trying to post a pic but its not working, and neither is editing.

Power poles are generally treated and its unhealthy to live in a cabin built from creosoted poles. If youre talking square hewn, thats a non-starter anyway as regards non prep of the logs. I didnt think hand peeling logs was the end of the world by any means. its hard work but it seemed rewarding for how they looked when done, its a character nothing else gives and reminds you of building it every moment you look at the small facets on the logs from the drawknife. I love laying in bed looking up at the purlins, ridge and wall logs with the way the light platys across them in the morning. It also gets you in terrific shape.

Aklogcabin
Member
# Posted: 5 Jun 2022 12:46
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As a guy who built a log cabin with 3 sided 6"" logs. I can say that a bit of common sense would get you buy. I used timberlock brand screws to fasten the logs together. With butyl caulk between instead of fiberglass insulation or sill seal. Our cabin is 16x24 built a cedar utility poles. Which worked very well BTW.
An electric hand planer will help keep things level. Using a butt n pass on the corners is easy enough. There are several types of jigs that fit on to a chainsaw and can help make square cuts on the log ends where they meet. You will figure out what works best for you. If you look at pictures of log cabins you can see the way every log was done.
We have been working on ours for 10 years and finally getting finished up. It's remote so we have to haul everything in in the winter with snogos n freight sleds. I'll put a couple pictures up to show the construction design. We get big snow n bigger earthquakes n it's still standing n the floor is level. I think I will try n pressure wash the outside of the logs to finish cleaning up the bark. Hopefully next year or so. With the 3' overhang everything stays dry n the snow slides far enough away from the cabin.
I'd suggest trying to educate yourself n go get some logs. Using a bit of common sense it's just putting logs together.
We enjoy the looks of logs n wood. And it's much better bear proofing for us. Good luck, you got this
East side
East side
West side, generator shed in back
West side, generator shed in back
Upstairs
Upstairs
From the front door
From the front door


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