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Small Cabin Forum / Cabin Construction / Foundation fix up
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NanWpg
Member
# Posted: 27 Sep 2017 17:36
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Hello everyone. Just want to paint a picture of what I need to do, and would appreciate some feedback, and ideas to fix up a 30 or so old foundation.

The cabin is off grid, semi road access (meaning we can drive almost to the cabin, but still have to drag stuff down a hill, and onto a boat) that has a foundation that has shifted over the years.

The floor joists are 2x8 sitting on top of triple 2x8 beams, which in turn sit on, 8x8” posts, which sit on 30” by 30” by 8” concrete pads which sit directly on soil (no gravel underneath)

In addition to the individual pads shifting, the entire cabin has also shifted slightly to the right, causing the pads and posts to move.

I believe 2 factors (aside from frost) have caused the movement.....

1. The pads on the right side of the cabin were poured so that they are flush with the outside wall (and also to accommodate a sidewalk)so the post sits right on the edge of the pad. These particular pads are always moving and require leveling yearly.

2. The annual snow melt gives us a nice river under the cabin each year, washing away soil and causing movement. (30 years ago there was a ditch to divert water but it has filled in).

I have eliminated culprit 2 by digging a trench, and putting in a 4” pipe, with some gravel and the spring run off is diverted around the cabin.

The sidewalk will be moved so that the pads can be centered properly to the posts.

I’d like to “redo” the pads and would like some ideas. Ideally I’d like to have gravel under the pads.

As I see it there are some options.....

1. Lift, pry the pads, shove gravel underneath, drop pad back down.

2. Start from scratch... jackhammer old pads, nice bed of gravel and pour new ones (pads only have to be 24”x24”x6”) that are smaller and lighter for future tweaking.

3. Drill into existing pads, epoxy rebar into them and pour new pads around old ones. My thought process is they’ve become this way over 30 years so don’t move them just use them.

I have no idea if the pads are reinforced or not. I can’t find any info wether they have to be or not.

Any thoughts, or ideas? There’s 24 pads in total but only 12 or so really need to be done. The ground slopes so there’s very little clearance underneath at the back (pads that are fine), but there is 33” of room underneath at the front.

I’ve attached a crappy pic.

Thanks everyone.
2141D297C99D4209A.jpeg
2141D297C99D4209A.jpeg


rockies
Member
# Posted: 27 Sep 2017 19:39
Reply 


There doesn't seem to be any anchors on the posts (either to the concrete pad or to the beams). When you level the pads you'll want to install post saddles in the concrete and tie-down straps to the beams.

NanWpg
Member
# Posted: 27 Sep 2017 21:26
Reply 


Thanks for that. I forgot to ask about anchors at the pad, and beam. None of the cabins have them, they just sit on top of everything.
Some cabins have the inner posts made up of cribbing stacks which give a bigger footprint.

If I do repour pads do they need to be reinforced or not? If so, how much rebar in a 24”x24” pad?

Just
Member
# Posted: 27 Sep 2017 21:43
Reply 


I do not think that gravel under the pads will help .looks like you need to eather pore new pads or straitened the old ones and use larger cribbing for stability. plus some ty downs

NanWpg
Member
# Posted: 27 Sep 2017 22:11
Reply 


I thought it was standard to have a gravel base, no?

I probably will go with cribbing stacks on the middle beams.

As for saddles, and tie downs, wouldn’t that make adjusting more complicated?

I think that’s why everyone just sat everything on top. Jack the area near the post, add a shingle or two to shim, and lower.

Steve_S
Member
# Posted: 28 Sep 2017 07:09 - Edited by: Steve_S
Reply 


First things first: Safety #1
- Don't go under there unless you shore it up somehow to prevent the cabin from shifting.
- Make sure no one is inside and there is NO MOVEMENT INSIDE if you do go under there !
Endangering your life for such a thing is just not worth it !

You did not say where you are located (regionally) which would help to some extent as far as dealing with the environment BUT you do say you get snow and significant melt, so some basics.

How deep is your soil before hitting bedrock ?
Have you dug a Pilot Hole next to your cabin to determine this ?

Ideally you would have poured piers in 6 or 8" sonotubes (depending on loads carried) which extend below the frost line. In my region (Pembroke, Ontario - NE Ontario) frost depth is 4 feet. IF you hit Bedrock above frost depth, you can just put sonotubes on top of the bedrock although some form connection would be wise, usually drilling a couple of holes into the rock and installing pins so your mechanically connecting the poured cement in the sonotubes to the bedrock IF your shallow. That is a discussion by itself.

You mention a boat being required to get access, so I am assuming your on an island or at least downriver without road access. You may have to cart some things to cabin by either floating it down behind the boat (raft or ?) or waiting to freeze up to cross over the ice with a snowmobile & sled. They obviously got the materials there so there is a means to do so.

Next alternative to that is Screw Piles. Pylex Screw Piles are available from most Building Supply Houses with various versions, they can usually be installed by two people and if you go big like "Commercial-66" they can withstand 5500lbs pull but these are for 6x6 posts.... The smaller ones can be done by one.
REF:
http://pylex.com/en/residential/hunting-camps-and-chalets?p=3

You have 3x, 2x8 giving you 4-1/2" thickness and Pylex makes them for that size as well... The 4" piles may do the trick, they make adjustable ones (raise & lower) but they are quite tricky to install as the retaining pin is pretty skimpy IMO.

Before we go underside, make sure you have restored the drainage swale(s) around the cabin to prevent water from going under, or at least minimizing it ! Wet Soil is slippery soil and unstable which makes this type of task very dangerous, so dry is best whenever possible... don't work under there after a rain when it's quite wet... work smart !

Lifting the cabin... You will have to relieve the pressure / stress on the existing setup before you do anything at all, you are inviting disaster if you don't... IF the cabin tips/slides you are in for a world of trouble & hurt - especially if you rear end is under it ! To lift you can use Hydraulic Jacks on wood blocks - most 20-ton come with extendable shafts and can give you 6" at max lift.... Tedium at it's best and this is NOT a one person job... Place a Lift Beam (can be wood 6x6) underneath at both ends and one every 6' (You failed to mention Cabin Size). Incremental lift, set criss cross wood blocking under lift beam, then next beam, and so on... Nice & Easy - no rush and anxious to get it done... tricky business. Two jacks lifting simultaneously on the lift beam will keep things even, even if your only lifting 4" max at a time and moving onto next beam... back & forth. Have the "other guy" lift at the same time you do, no tipping ! LISTEN TO THE BUILDING ! As you lift and adjust you will hear creaks & groans from the building, that is fine as long as they are minimal sound... hearing a crack or snap = BAD, so nice and easy - this is not something to rush with.

** NOTE** make sure plumbing, electrical, anything coming out of the bottom of cabin is disconnected or loose enough so that there is no pull on it. Might require disconnecting plumbing, wires etc, if done properly, should be no problem to reinstall / reconnect. IF you have propane, unhook that too ! That is tempting Murphy's Laws too much.

Once your high enough & building is "stable" get underside and clear the crap out of there.... The existing blocks could be pulled out and/or shifted out of the way, other stuff should be cleared so you can work under it safely without scraps in your way.... !!! Always have a clear escape route should all of a sudden you hear creaking, cracking or anything else indicating that sh*t is about to happen.... This is NOT the time to be blasting tunes from the ghetto blaster ! You must be able to hear the building !!!

To use "stacked piers" you could reuse your existing concrete block pads BUT you would first have to move them, dig down a good couple of feet and put in good crushed gravel which will pack (no river gravel, hard/sharp edge gravel) slide the pads onto that and then more "cottage blocks" on top, centering under the cabin beams (not lift beams, unless you want to use them permanently, which could be an alternate option and may be possible and even more practical but many questions if that needs to be explored). NOTE that if this method is used, frost heaving will still occur and you are just buying time till the next repair is needed, shifting & tilting will just happen again.

EDIT:
I should have also included this option for consideration and this depends on what is in the ground underneath as well... Using Square Pads under a post puts the main load into a very small easily shiftable point, this is what you have going on, the house is on freestanding toothpicks ! it will topple as it is now. Transferring that load evenly and spreading out the weight over a larger area will help stabilize and reduce shift/twist potential. One solution that "may" also work is using Big Foot Bases which are also available at most building supply shops.

REF: http://bigfootsystems.com/include/products.htm

The weight is spread out to the entire base and an adjustable bracket system can be put into the top where the beams would rest, that way you could go down and make adjustments as / when needed. Being circular they would provide stops for water to collect, freeze and shift it. They do need to be on gravel and still have adequate drainage to keep water away. These can also serve as the Best Bases for Sonotubes due to this simple design. The wider the base, the more stable, like the BF28 versus the BF20... sure it's more concrete but stability & durability for the long term is a good payback.

I have used these with Great Success when I renovated my old house (built 1887) and had to provide extended support underneath when we dug out the crawlspace into a standing basement with 6' height. (A job I would never do again, that was killer digging that out with pick & shovel on my knees shifting over 25 tonnes of clay & rock by hand only on a weekend - a Labour Day weekend in fact, and it was labourious to say the least).

Semi Quick overvue... for a better answer from myself / others we will need more details. These should only be considered as opinions and everything taken with a pinch of salt ! Common Sense applied will help you judge and always whatever you do think Safety 1st ! A shack can be replaced but you as an individual cannot ! Don't skimp on time (ie rush), this is one of the more difficult & dangerous tasks to undertake and care & patience is important.

Questions for better answers:
1- Size of Cabin and general build info (2x4 / 2x6 framing) to help determine weights & loads etc
2- General Regional Location
3- What is the usual frost depth in your region
4- How deep is the bedrock level ?
4a- Is it Solid bedrock, gravel or boulders ? If you know.
5) can you float, raft or barge material to your cabin ? Sled it in over winter ?
6) Can you remove material from inside the cabin prior to lifting & working under it ? This would be most prudent to lighten it ! You would be surprised what our living junk weighs !
7) Is the cabin in good solid condition ? If it has weaknesses, may need a bit of support, bracing etc...

Hope this helps some and if you answer my questions and provide a bit more info, that will help us give you better suggestions, options & opinions.

Just
Member
# Posted: 28 Sep 2017 10:30 - Edited by: Just
Reply 


Steve is a self acclamed perfectionist and his ways I will admit are the best ways . I ,on the other hand, am a pragmatist. Unfortunately your cabin was built by somone like me and time has proven Steve's ways are the best . Tempering that the cabin my have never been built without access to Steves knolage and budget. In witch case the builder and his young family could not have enjoyed having a cabin in the woods ever ..
On that note ,gravel will not help your cause. pads should be placed on undesturbe soil free of all organic material. If they are leval and large enough with enough large cribbing the cabin should see your needs through for many years.

Thelar
Member
# Posted: 28 Sep 2017 10:42 - Edited by: Thelar
Reply 


When we bought our camp years ago it was on stacked cement blocks(insert you might be a redneck joke). I had a leveling company dig a foot down put landscaping felt in the hole and fill with crushed stone. Then they placed an engineered pad(cookie) on top of the crushed stone. Finally I had them put in 6x6 posts with bracing that sits on the engineered pad. The 6x6 posts are not anchored to the engineered pads. This is the way a lot of seasonal camps are in Maine. We haven't had any frost heave issues. We also don't have any drainage issues under the camp. I think you have addressed the issue with yours, but no matter what you do if you don't fix that first you may still have problems. Like Steve_S said, please think safety first. The picture you posted looks dangerous. Good luck, and update us when you get it leveled.
Camp_side1.png
Camp_side1.png
ConcreteCookie.jpg
ConcreteCookie.jpg


NanWpg
Member
# Posted: 28 Sep 2017 12:33
Reply 


Further info.....

Cabin is 1400 square feet. (32x44), in whiteshell Park, Manitoba, near Ontario

Frost line I believe is about 4 feet. Bedrock is solid, but depth varies. There is no visible rock on our lot, and when the neighbor drilled for his foundation, the depth was anywhere from 3 feet to 40 feet.
We have road access close to, but not up to the cabin. We boat everything because it’s easier. The neighbor had his airtrac drill guys trudge through the Forrest with the equipment. We could sled stuff in the winter, but I’d rather not do this.

We could remove stuff, but again I’d rather not. Cabin is in fairly good condition, 2x4 framing, 3/8 panel siding.

* one thing I’d like to point out is the cabin is in two parts. Original, and new, with the two additions having their beams share a post where they meet. It appears the roof, floor, and wall paneling are what’s holding the two parts together **

I looked into screw piles. 900 per pile installed. Not sure if it’s economically viable.

I’d rather not do a lot of digging. It’s not my cabin, it’s my in laws, and I’m just trying to lend a hand and help out when and where I can.

As for lifting the cabin, I was hoping to lift at each post just enough to get the post out and relieved the pad.

Plan of attack was the outer posts as they will be carrying most of the load, and then give a more stable cabin to go underneath.

And yes, I have lots of 4x4’s cut into two foot lengths for safety cribbing if I ever go underneath.

A few points of interest... we don’t use it in the winter, and other than some help from the father in law I’m pretty much on my own as everyone else likes to come out and eat, drink, sleep, tan, fish, eat and sleep some more, and drink some more , but not at all interested in doing any work.

I’d also like to do this cheaply as possible because I have no financial interest in the cabin.

Steve_S
Member
# Posted: 28 Sep 2017 17:32
Reply 


@Just... I am neither rich, wealthy nor an expert... in fact I am now subsisting on a small disability pension and have zero credit, everything I do is self financed, saved for and patiently, thoughtfully planned out for the most part. I did have a kick start with a small settlement from the military (injured while in service) and my GF manages all funds, investments and whatnot... I just do.

As for experience, my father was a General Contractor, grew up surrounded by that industry and over a 1/2 century of being around it I picked up a thing or two AND having an partially Eidetic memory doesn't hurt in these instances. As for being a perfectionist... I AM A VIRGO ! so that's a built in defect which is hard to over ride... hence why post military, I went into technology engineering.

Safety First & Always ! Heck my kids started calling me "Safety Dad" by the time they each reached 3.... More for Parental Sanity with a herd of kids running about actually but good practise regardless.

@NanWpg: Geez I hear you on everyone uses the place but not a soul will lift a finger to keep it standing and going... Charge them $50 a day during visits to offset maintenance & repairs ! Watch them vanish in a hurry... Good for you for being the responsible In-Law (mind you charging for visits might convert you to outlaw status), might not be so bad.

The Pylex Piles are for the Homesteader & Consumer and are designed for two people to be able to screw them in, they work a treat and not hard to do... I believe instructions are posted on their site... Commercial Screw Piles require machinery and more fiddling to make right. The Pyles Piles are not that hard to make use of, 1 long 4x4 and leverage in your favour and Bob's your uncle.

We are given the freedom to choose which applies to pretty much everything but one must consider... "We must choose what is Right or what is Easy" which also applies to the vast majority of life today.

Cost Wise, Pylex Screw Piles are as follows from Home Despot:

Pylex Model # 10730 | Store SKU # 1001017964
Pylex Commercial 66 Foundation Screw $ 72.29 Each
These are for 6x6 & Heavy Duty !
REF: https://www.homedepot.ca/en/home/p.pylex-commercial-66-foundation-screw.1001017964.ht ml

Pylex Model # 10500 | Store SKU # 1000110907
Pylex Foundation Screw $19.41 each
REF: https://www.homedepot.ca/en/home/p.pylex-foundation-screw.1000110907.html?autoSuggest =pip

BigFoot bases are also not very expensive and they distribute weight across the wide foot and balance better.

Bigfoot Systems Model # BF24
Store SKU # 1000105784
Sold in-store only $23.61 / each
REF: https://www.homedepot.ca/en/home/p.concrete-footing-form.1000105784.html

NOTE: using the BigFoot base with an Adjustable top as shown below provides future adjustability.

Pylex Model # 12105 | Store SKU # 1000746289
Sold online & in-store Adjustable deck support 4x4 $9.98 ea.
REF: https://www.homedepot.ca/en/home/p.adjustable-deck-support-4x4.1000746289.html

** There is also a 6x6 version.

The two sections being held together by roof etc... Hmmm sounds like even more caution is needed and some serious checking that before attempting lifting, shifting or anything else, you could create a heap'o'shnootz !

1400 square feet will weigh a considerable amount ! and to be honest "unloading" the cabin of all weighty things prior to moving/shifting it is the wise move... Heavies can become ballistic items if they start to shift inside and really make your life miserable.

An ounce of prevention is definitely worth a pound or two of cure ! Very true when dealing with older builds and many other things.

NanWpg
Member
# Posted: 28 Sep 2017 19:02
Reply 


Not much I can do about the non workers. The parents/grandparents allow it and it’s not my place to say anything, although I’m often tempted to not go out anymore.

I was thinking of adding a third 2x8 to the beam making it a 4 ply.

So are you saying to lift the entire cabin? That’s more than I’m comfortable doing, and I also have to consider I’m only out there 20 to 30 days a years tops. That’s assuming that I don’t do anything else on my holidays and time off.
Subtract bad weather days and it’s not much.

As to the screwpiles, we have 33” space underneath the front, and even less near the middle. Not sure how much room is needed to screw these things in?

rockies
Member
# Posted: 28 Sep 2017 19:29
Reply 


Hmm. Given all the additional info, I would create cribbing supports in the middle of the cabin on either side of where the posts are now. A nice square of 6x6 pressure treated material about 3 feet square and centered under the beams will give you more support should the cabin ever shift sideways (some of those posts look like they're at an 75 degree angle).

You could pour new pads under the cribbing too. As to the posts around the exterior I would build a temporary support next to the post along the beam then remove the old post, drill a hole in the pad , epoxy in a post support, install the post again and tie it into the beam with metal connectors.

That's about the cheapest method.

rockies
Member
# Posted: 28 Sep 2017 19:56
Reply 


I looked at the Pylex website. The heavy duty commercial grade screw pile is rated for 5000 lbs capacity.

http://pylex.com/content/dt/10730DT.JPG

Also , I see it recommended for patios, tool sheds and decks. I don't think it is strong enough for a cabin.

NanWpg
Member
# Posted: 28 Sep 2017 21:00
Reply 


New pads can be 24x24x6”.
Would they need to be reinforced?

Why 6x6? I have lots of 4x4 pieces for cribbing, mainly for safety, but once outer pads are done I was gonna use them for inner support.

Just
Member
# Posted: 28 Sep 2017 21:13
Reply 


Did the old pads break or just shift.??

NanWpg
Member
# Posted: 29 Sep 2017 13:33
Reply 


Just shifted

Just
Member
# Posted: 29 Sep 2017 13:44
Reply 


Tells me they are strong enough so go similar or reuse but change to larger cribbing with horizontal bracing .O yes ditto on the water control and safety.

NanWpg
Member
# Posted: 29 Sep 2017 14:05
Reply 


If I,pour new pads do I reinforce them or not?

I think it’ll be,difficult to,relieved the existing heavy pads. Easier,to pour new ones??

Just
Member
# Posted: 29 Sep 2017 14:43
Reply 


It can't hurt . you can buy and cut reanforsment fabric or use scrap chain link if you have . I have used fiberglass strands with success they are light to transport..You can buy precast 18 x24 x3 in .concrete shed pads . I used them under a bunkie last spring . I used two per site to get to 6 in. thickness. they were about 50 lb. each and cost 9.95 $ at a Home Hardware building center Ontario .

rockies
Member
# Posted: 29 Sep 2017 18:57
Reply 


Using 6x6 pressure treated material gives you more support. As the wood decays over the years you still have a fair amount of good wood left inside as opposed to a 4x4.

NanWpg
Member
# Posted: 29 Sep 2017 19:49
Reply 


How will the pressure wood decay sitting on concrete?
There’s wood at the cabin that is almost 80 years old.

The cribbing will not be in direct contact with the ground

rockies
Member
# Posted: 30 Sep 2017 17:59
Reply 


I've seen many PT posts and beams start to decay (usually from the inside) because not enough preservative was put onto the cut ends. When you cut yours you should fill a bucket or a pan with the preservative and stand the ends in it overnight.

ICC
Member
# Posted: 30 Sep 2017 21:56
Reply 


Quoting: rockies
I've seen many PT posts and beams start to decay (usually from the inside) because not enough preservative was put onto the cut ends.


Not treating cut ends can lead to failures, but I think it is more likely that the reason you have seen PT wood rot is that the incorrect product was used. I can't remember ever seeing PT lumber in a big box store that was treated for use in ground. They have above ground and ground contact as a rule. Anything buried needs to have a higher concentration of the preservative if it is to be buried. That stuff may be labeled foundation grade and the label will clearly state it can be used IN ground, not just ground contact or above ground use.

Foundation grade also differs in that it will usually have no heartwood. Have a look at the end of any big box store 4x4 or 6x6 and you can see the heart. Heartwood in quite resistant to absorbing the chemicals that preserve the wood. Some species are worse than others. Some species (doug fir for one) need to have the surfaces incised to even get treated well enough for ground contact use.

PT can last in ground for many decades when the right grade is used. We have a couple small buildings on piers that Dad built in the late 70's. He used foundation grade CCA. We moved one of them a few years back. Jacked them off the piers and set it down on a concrete slab. We dug and pulled the old piers. They were still amazing and I re-used them in a retaining wall.

neckless
Member
# Posted: 2 Oct 2017 20:10
Reply 


you guys are talkin about the fix but dont see the failer there is no x bracing and now its all crooked....bummer..

NanWpg
Member
# Posted: 18 Mar 2018 12:37
Reply 


Thanks for all the replies.

Final decision has been made.

I’ve decided that since it’s not my cabin, it’s not my concern to fix the foundation.

I’m tired of going out there, at my expense (fuel, wear and tear on vehicle, missed overtime at work, buying food for certain people who are always there, and never bring food in reciprocation), and working for free while others (actual owners blood relative) come out each and every weekend without fail from May until October as well as the entire month of August and do absolutely nothing. In previous years this person at the very least helped carry food and supplies down the hill, onto the boat,, and into the cabin. Last year he could not even be bothered to do this.

It’s too bad it’s come to this, as I really like the place. I’m looking for my own place, or at least renting a cabin.

Just gotta get the wife on board. She’s used to her useless brother as it’s completely normal for her. But I just can’t do it any more.

Nate R
Member
# Posted: 18 Mar 2018 20:52
Reply 


I think you made a wise decision. It IS a shame, but you can only control you.

NanWpg
Member
# Posted: 18 Mar 2018 21:14
Reply 


Ya it is a shame. I haven’t even told the in laws I’m not coming out, or doing anymore work.

Do I just lie and say cabin life ain’t for me? Do I say I’d really just appreciate my own place?

Or do I just be honest and tell them I can’t stand their useless son?

I was actually ok with doing all the work. I enjoy it. What did me in was on a day trip into the closest town for a restock on supplies and food...... useless boy came along for a ride to pick up all his beer, etc.

I asked the in laws if we could stop in to the hardware store (on the way back..literally drove right by it). This was to buy a clip for cell booster tower that I paid for..... for HIM and he said we couldn’t stop at the store because “I’m on holidays and we’re not wasting any more of my time driving around”.

And just like that.... I no longer want to buy his food, cook his food! Do his dishes, and carry the food into the cabin for him.

Ya, I know every family has one of these guys. But believe me, there is NO ONE like him!

Rant over

NanWpg
Member
# Posted: 14 Mar 2020 00:43
Reply 


Well to update things, sadly father in law passed away this January. Mom has asked that we buy half the cabin, so we are actually buying 3/4 of it from her.

So, the foundation project is back on. I’d like to spend as little as possible, but safety is first.

My plane is to “rebuild” the existing exterior piers, which should stabilize things, and then The interior piers.

Current piers are 8’ part, so the plans is to actually instal new piers and space them out every 6’. Should help distribute weight better.

Also, the new interior piers will be built up 2 x 6 cribs rather than the current “toothpick” posts.

So basically additional exterior cribs for safety/stability > rebuild existing exterior “toothpicks” > add additional interior cribs for stability/safety > rebuild existing interior “toothpicks”.

My thinking is that I stabilize the exterior piers/toothpicks. It’s a gable roof so a good portion of the cottage weight is carried by the exterior walls.

I add the additional crib piers first before I rebuild existing toothpicks.

Same thing for the interior..... I place new piers beside existing toothpicks which will add stability and then Rebuild existing toothpicks.

Cabin width is 32’ across so there are 4 pads across the back with the beams directly on the pads. These pads have shifted very little, if at all and propbably the only reason the toothpicks haven’t toppled.

Also keep in mind I don’t really want to lift the entire structure. I just want to stabilize what we currently have, and I accept it’s out of level. It’s a cabin used half the year. It’s gonna shift somewhat.

Does my plan make sense? Does it sound safe? Stabilize exterior before I go interior?

I really don’t want to sub this out. I’m scared to even get quotes. I’m thinking 10’s of thousands of dollars.

Grandkids/nephews were actually helping grandpa rebuilding a few exterior pads,last year. I didn’t go out at all. Still pissed at BIL. He’s in for a shock this year as new rules are being implemented. Basically if ya wanna come out, ya gotta work. Otherwise stay home.

Brettny
Member
# Posted: 14 Mar 2020 07:16 - Edited by: Brettny
Reply 


Nan I took a look at the original picture from 2017. Your posts may have started to tip because they have no good connection to the girter there under. 8x8 are a fine piece of timber to use for a post you just need to notch it into the girter it's under and through bolt it to the girter. In the center as long as these posts are about 1in away from the concrete they wouldn't really need to be pressure treated. The posts around the edge I would use pressure treated.

When you fix the foundation you need to make sure your not getting any water run off under there. Any leveling you do or repairs will just be destroyed. Put gutters on or/and a swale up hill to get any surface water away.

Pic shows notching a post for a girter.
20190716_060339.jpg
20190716_060339.jpg


Brettny
Member
# Posted: 14 Mar 2020 07:24
Reply 


Also how long are the boards that make up the girters/beams? You really want a post under almost every break in the lumber. 8ft between posts would be to much to me with doubled up 2x8s. Now is the time to add more to the girters if your going to do it.

We will be doing double 2x12 with plywood in between and not more than 6ft spacing.

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