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Small Cabin Forum / Member's Projects and Photos / NW Wisconsin 24x30 build, take a look!
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hijlehhw
Member
# Posted: 2 Jan 2020 17:42
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I started this build last winter, its taking longer than I planned as my work schedule is super hectic. I purchased the 5.5 acres in NW Wisconsin after the house that had been on the property burned down. I planned and built the cabin on the existing foundation (poured basement). I took on this challenge because I have rehabbed many many homes but have never started a project from the very beginning and wanted to learn. Boy has this been a learning experience!

I'm framed up, roof is on, weather tight and am now getting ready to do rough electrica/plumbing and have HVAC installed. I'll have some questions so Im hoping that some fellas here will be able to answer or point me in the right direction. I've been lurking on the forums for years and have learned tons but still have quite a bit to figure out. I am doing this all on my own, and often wish there was just someone I could call that knew what I should do, or what common practice is, it would save me hours of google searching.

Well and septic are existing, I have to run a new water line and replace well pump, holding tank is in and line from basement wall to tank is still intact but will likely have to be replaced just to be safe. I have a 4" pipe run out the roof for the main vent stack and will have to finish rough plumbing in the vent and the discharge of the wall. (If anyone is familiar with plumbing I have a couple questions, I read the code but it sometimes makes me go cross-eyed)

I'll just post some pictures to start and let me know if you have any questions! This has been very exciting and sometimes frustrating, but Im LEARNING and having fun at the same time, just sometimes the learning curve can be frustrating. Just want to make sure everything is done right.
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hijlehhw
Member
# Posted: 2 Jan 2020 17:55
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Some more progress
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hijlehhw
Member
# Posted: 2 Jan 2020 17:56
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Deck/Porch going on, monotrusses
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hijlehhw
Member
# Posted: 2 Jan 2020 17:58
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Siding going on, deck/porch complete, this is pretty much where it is currently. Having the LP tank set and furnace/ductwork put in next week, looking to get rough plumbing in and rough electrical for inspection to insulate.
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Brettny
Member
# Posted: 3 Jan 2020 07:43
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For any code related questions you should be really asking the person who is going to be stamping your approval. Just the fact that your asking questions can show him/her that you want to do it correct.

I haven't even broke ground yet and have talked to the building/code enforcement many times. A few times before we even went to look at property.

hijlehhw
Member
# Posted: 3 Jan 2020 08:48
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Thanks, yes I have talked with him several times, he seems pretty decent, I'll no doubt have plenty more questions. I usually look into things pretty deep and generally know the answer but just confirm with him. I also sometimes feel guilty if I were to "bug" him too much asking a million questions, but I guess part of me also thinks thats what Im paying the guy for? Ultimately I want to do it right so I guess thats all that matters.

Aklogcabin
Member
# Posted: 3 Jan 2020 11:44
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Looks good man! I would say you’re doing a great job. And now you know a lot more having done it. As you know every job has its issues. You work through them. And learn even more than what you may need at the moment. It ain’t all in a book. You did it !
Don’t beat up on yourself. You’re not the first to discover cost overruns and underestimating time. I usually try to figure time n material on jobs. Then double it. Should probably quad it. I’m still learning.
Probably some good hunting around their huh ?

hijlehhw
Member
# Posted: 3 Jan 2020 13:13
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Thanks for the encouragement! Def some times I think I bit off more than I could chew but overall I really am enjoying it and like I said learning a ton, which is what I wanted when I started out. Its relatively small, so sometimes I remind myself I could be trying to build a 3k sq ft place myself, that would be even worse and people do it everyday, so like you said I am just tryin to break the project up into manageable pieces and attack each one as it comes and not get overwhelmed.

Like I said cabin is 24x30 with full poured basement. Holding tank and well are in already, electrical is at the meter about 50ft from the house. 8/12 roof on the cabin, interior is 6/12 cathedral scissor truss over living room, about half of the cabin. Will be 1 bedroom and 1 bath on the main floor. I dont plan on finishing the basement until further down the line.

My next big project is to bring the electrical line from the meter outside, through the 3" buried conduit already in place (from the old house) to the basement. It's already through the basement I just have to pull the wire and then hang my electrical box. I have a GFI outlet mounted on the meter outside now to run cords for tools, but I need to get it into the house. I am fine pulling the wire, and mounting the box and even working inside the box, but I'm not crazy about hooking the cable up to the meter, thats beyond my University of Youtube comfort level. The bummer is that I contacted an electrician to hook the wires up for me and he wanted $1500 to do it...I refuse to pay that for a couple hours work, so Im gonna try and find a friend of a friend who can lend a hand. I'll run the wires and all he will have to do is stand at the meter, take the socket out and wire up.

Back to the cabin, man I love being up there in the fall. I have a pretty stressful consuming job and there is something about being up in that area in the fall, with the leaves falling, the wind through the tress and making sawdust that is about the most therapeutic thing a guy can do.

I should also comment on overall plan with the property. I took a month long log building class where I learned to do full scribe log building. I initially wanted to build a log cabin on the property but being this is my first full project I didnt want to have to deal with code etc building with log and I was in a hurry to get it capped for winter so I am stick framing this structure. Once my rough ins are done it will be all downhill from there for me as the rest of everything I am very comfortable and quick with having done plenty of home renovations over the years. Drywall, cabinets, trim, doors, etc all simple for me and quick. My GF is an interior designer so I am letting her pick out the finishes (that was the deal haha) once the main cabin is done then the real fun starts and what I am most excited about. I have a woodmizer sawmill and am planning on having some logs delivered. I know some family friends in the area that are loggers and have access to reasonably priced logs. My first project (again deal with GF) is to build a sauna. I dont know if I will do dovetail timber or full scribe log for this, I havent decided yet, but I plan on putting this in the back of the cabin next to a small pond so that you could take a dip in the winter and jump back in the sauna afterward. I'll post pics on this thread when I get to that point. (this thread will end up being pretty long, both for feedback and for record for myself, like a journal kinda) and then after he sauna, I am going to build a small bunkhouse for friends in the back of the property. I have been thinking since I would like to do both dovetail timber and full scribe log, I will make the sauna one or the other and then the bunkhouse whatever the other one is that the sauna is not.

Hunting is good up there, I have hunted the area for the last 20 years. Some big swamp bucks in the area and my best friends family owns just shy of 1000 acres of timber on the family farm about 5 miles from this place. Also I am exactly 2 miles from a boat landing on the major recreational lake in the area and there are tons of snowmobile and ATV trails in the county, its main industry for the area is logging and tourism.

Plenty more to figure out on this journey. I try to not get carried away and just focus on the next steps. Right now that is bringing electrical into the basement and getting the rough plumbing and electrical in.

Thanks for the comments, let me know if any questions. Eventually I'll get into materials and where/how I sourced them and continue to post as I start/finish projects etc. I also keep an excel spreadsheet of all costs associated with the project. I started that before I even began the project and set goals for expenses, some I am over on and some I am under on so it becomes kind of a fun game. Stick to budget but be smart about it and I dont mind spending a little more if it results in a higher quality product/experience at the cabin. So far so good, but this electrical wiring into the house is the biggest thing Im trying to figure out right now.

hijlehhw
Member
# Posted: 9 Jan 2020 20:45
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Just an update, purchased a wood stove for the cabin from Menards. I had initially wanted a "Summers Heat Tranquility" stove, at least this was the one the GF liked for its modern and clean lines but it has evidently been discontinued. I read some reviews on it and they said that although it was aesthetically pleasing it had some venting issues and the quality control was evidently lacking as there were several reviews describing some warping with the front door. Kind of a bummer, I liked the look of the stove but ultimately glad I didnt end up purchasing it. That stove was around $750 shipped, so I did save a litle money with this one and it has the same square/clean.modern lines I was looking for, not quite as sharp IMO as the other stove but it will look great in the space. Im not putting it in yet, I'll wait till we get closer to completion but since the experience with the last stove when I found one that I liked and will work I wanted to purchase to make sure I get it and it doesn't get discontinued etc.

Link to stove: https://www.menards.com/main/heating-cooling/fireplaces-stoves/wood-stoves/vogelzang- small-plate-stove-1-200-sq-ft/vg1120-l/p-1560752892847-c-6884.htm

I'm heading up again in a week and will take more pictures. Furnace and duct work should be in. I also purchased wiring and misc plus some can lights for porch soffit that I will install once I get up there again. Transitioning to the next phase of rough plumbing and electrical. I also ordered the two interior doors I needed. I will have oak french doors leading in the bedroom and oak 2-panel doors for a closet/pantry and the bathroom. I ordered these from menards also and am excited to pick them up and bring them up north. Picture represents the look of the door but I purchased them unfinished as I didnt like the available prefinished colors. The GF is a designer and she will make the call on colors, when I see golden or honey wheat oak all I can think of is the 1990's so I didnt want to go with that color, we are shooting for kind of modern with the rustic farmhouse feel and neutral colors, hard to explain but I'll try and post a picture of the design board the GF put together with ideas etc.

On a side note, she is really starting to get excited about the project, thats nice/fun because initially she was a little apprehensive that it would take a ton of time and be stressful. I think as she sees it progressing and becoming a reality she is more and more on board with it, and after the framing and tough physical stuff was done, now it is getting into her expertise and area of the design and so she is more involved. So Im happy that it is a collaborative effort and something that we can both contribute to and feel a part of. Sometimes she wants things that arent practical and I have to tactfully steer her in another direction if I can, and sometimes shes pretty set on what she wants and I have to just try and find a way to accommodate haha. So Im doing my best but its been fun so far and Im looking forward to the rest of the project.

Like I said, once I get the electrical and plumbing roughed in it will be all downhill and I'm really excited for that phase of the project, it cant come soon enough.
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