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Small Cabin Forum / Cabin Construction / screw piles
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saskabin
Member
# Posted: 25 Jun 2019 22:57
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I just got a quote the other day, and for a 20x20 cabin (9 piles) they asked 4600CAD installed, taxes included. I did not expect this much.
They are 15ft long while the frost line is at about 4-5 feet.
Anyone here who installed screw piles recently?

Brettny
Member
# Posted: 26 Jun 2019 07:35
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Thats more expensive than a frost wall and a slab i would think. Whats the benifits over sono tubes?

beachman
Member
# Posted: 26 Jun 2019 09:25
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In some soils, frost will grab sono tubes and gradually lift them out. I have had a deck with screw piles in clay (the worst) soil and no movement for four years. You definitely don't want to be messing with tubes out of sync once the cabin is in place. The quote sounds really high but if a cabin is sitting on it maybe the need for more robust piles - not sure. I would get a second opinion.

Steve_S
Member
# Posted: 26 Jun 2019 12:02 - Edited by: Steve_S
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FYI, an Important READ in regards to Screw Piles.

GoliathTech: An alarming number of helical screw piles installations potentially at risk in Canada
Canadian consumers deserve a better protection


http://www.globenewswire.com/news-release/2019/06/19/1871477/0/en/GoliathTech-An-alar ming-number-of-helical-screw-piles-installations-potentially-at-risk-in-Canada.html


I've used Screw Piles from the smaller screw piles as well as the larger Commercial 66 from Pylex Corp with no issues but not to hold up a building as such. Using these types of piles for a structure is fine BUT it must meet loading & stress requirements and be appropriately selected for the soil types & more... You just can't use these willy nilly to get around things, careful thought must be applied.

A viable & practical alternative where even Sono-Tubes could be problematic is the use of Bigfoot Tubes which prevent frost heave / lift and maintain their "attitude" once placed and filled.
REF: https://www.bigfootsystems.com/index.htm
Available ate most Big Box & DIY supply houses and NOT very expensive. They work a treat in many applications, always had good luck with them.

Brettny
Member
# Posted: 26 Jun 2019 16:04
Reply 


If you dont back fill before you fill the tubes and bell out the bottom of your sono tube hole theres not much need for big foot forums. You can also put plastic around your tubes so the frost dont grip them.

saskabin
Member
# Posted: 26 Jun 2019 23:22
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the cabin is in SK so cold is really an issue here. My lot is in a remote area and the lake is about 200m away, no well and no power yet. That is why I want to go with screw piles.
Also, the local inspector seems to like them and I wanna play it safe. But I don't understand why are they so expensive.

Brettny
Member
# Posted: 27 Jun 2019 07:21
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Have you got other quotes yet? How remote it is dosnt really matter. Used UTVs are getting very affordable and you would have a usefull tool to use/sell later. A cement mixer and a pallet of concrete with a few friends and you will be in business.

How much acess do they need for screw piles? I doubt there screwing them in by hand.

saskabin
Member
# Posted: 27 Jun 2019 19:32
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I'm trying to get more quotes but seems like contractors are busy and it's hard to get something from them. Still waiting for some guys to get back to me.
If it's too expensive than I'm going to use sonotubes, but I don't know how to chose the size or anything.

FishHog
Member
# Posted: 28 Jun 2019 09:35
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I didn't think that price was all that bad. Half of that cost I'm sure is just time to get their men and equipment to your site, as the install time won't be that much once there.
But time is money and I'm sure they have a lot tied up into men and equipment.

Not saying I'd do it, but stuff like that is never cheap, and if your at all remote, it gets even more expensive.

NorthRick
Member
# Posted: 28 Jun 2019 16:05
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Quoting: saskabin
I'm trying to get more quotes but seems like contractors are busy and it's hard to get something from them.


That's probably part of the cost. They already have enough work but if you'll pay enough to make it worth their while...

creeky
Member
# Posted: 29 Jun 2019 10:27
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I used el cheapo Pylex deck screw piles I put in by myself. I did the first one by hand with a 2x4 lever. And then made an adapter for my tractor PTO driven post hole digger.

They have worked the ticket. Absolutely no movement in 3 years. Or is it 4 now. My how time flies. The building is a winter bedroom. The post is here somewhere. 10x14.

Steve_S mentioned the pylex commercial 66.

They show it supporting a pretty big building. You might be able to do something like that with a buddy or a local farmer with a PTO tractor/rental.

Steve_S
Member
# Posted: 29 Jun 2019 11:18
Reply 


LOL.... I did things the hard way and manually screwed in the C-66's with a 10' 6x6 to spin them down... a CHORE would be an understatement, considering I hit rocks a few feet down. Damned Glacial Rubble & Erratics ! 10' was not bad but had I used a 12' the extra leverage would have helped. Helps to have a Second Man @ the pile to hold everything straight & in place as you spin them down into the ground.... also a second hand is good IF you hit something below the surface.

The 66 series are NOTHING like the smaller ones used for decks and are certified for some pretty heavy duty stuff like those big Tent / Covered barns and pole buildings as well... I'm not sure if that is a Federal or Provincial certification but the doc's should be pretty clear on that. Also the price isn't bad @ $72 a piece.

REF: https://www.homedepot.ca/product/pylex-pylex-commercial-66-foundation-screw/100101796 4

Malamute
Member
# Posted: 1 Jul 2019 11:15
Reply 


Quoting: saskabin
I'm trying to get more quotes but seems like contractors are busy and it's hard to get something from them. Still waiting for some guys to get back to me.
If it's too expensive than I'm going to use sonotubes, but I don't know how to chose the size or anything.


Ask the guys at your lumber yard, they have charts for sizing sonotubes. Its probably online also. I tend to step up size wise when doing such things.

I think the bigfoot footers are well worth the money. Ive had tubes move when pouring concrete that werent backfilled. HUGE pain the the behind. Extremely simple with bigfoots and backfilled.

You can get or make adjusters for use on sonotube pillars. Its not uncommon for log work to allow for shrinkage and settling of various parts. Ive used them on porch posts.

AKfisher
Member
# Posted: 1 Jul 2019 12:37 - Edited by: AKfisher
Reply 


I priced out doing sonotubes by myself. Once you factor in the skidsteer rental to dig the holes (12" sonotubes) buy the sonotubes ( I was going to do 6' deep with 2' above grade), rebar cages, mixer truck, finishing work. The price vs screw piles wasn't much. I called a helical pier company, they showed up and installed all the piers in one day and were gone.

12 piers, 16'x24 cabin with 8' porch.

The cabin has been through a 7.0 earthquake, and lots of after shocks.
16x24
16x24
cabin
cabin


saskabin
Member
# Posted: 3 Jul 2019 13:41
Reply 


Quoting: Steve_S
LOL.... I did things the hard way and manually screwed in the C-66's with a 10' 6x6 to spin them down... a CHORE would be an understatement, considering I hit rocks a few feet down. Damned Glacial Rubble & Erratics ! 10' was not bad but had I used a 12' the extra leverage would have helped. Helps to have a Second Man @ the pile to hold everything straight & in place as you spin them down into the ground.... also a second hand is good IF you hit something below the surface.

The 66 series are NOTHING like the smaller ones used for decks and are certified for some pretty heavy duty stuff like those big Tent / Covered barns and pole buildings as well... I'm not sure if that is a Federal or Provincial certification but the doc's should be pretty clear on that. Also the price isn't bad @ $72 a piece.

was your local building inspector happy with this kind of piles? Mine wants to see an engineering certificate.

saskabin
Member
# Posted: 3 Jul 2019 13:42 - Edited by: saskabin
Reply 


Quoting: AKfisher
I priced out doing sonotubes by myself. Once you factor in the skidsteer rental to dig the holes (12" sonotubes) buy the sonotubes ( I was going to do 6' deep with 2' above grade), rebar cages, mixer truck, finishing work. The price vs screw piles wasn't much. I called a helical pier company, they showed up and installed all the piers in one day and were gone.

what was your price if you don't mind
did you use the free plan that is available on several diy websites?

Steve_S
Member
# Posted: 3 Jul 2019 13:58
Reply 


I used the screw piles for a frame structure which made life simple as no inspection needed for that.

My cabin & powerhouse are on frost protected slabs.

AKfisher
Member
# Posted: 8 Jul 2019 12:01
Reply 


Quoting: saskabin
what was your price if you don't mind did you use the free plan that is available on several diy websites?


What part? the DIY sono tubes?
I don't remember, probably have my notes laying around somewhere. I vaguely remember it would cost me about $3k to do them myself.

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