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lenny
# Posted: 2 Dec 2007 19:45
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a breadbox type hotwater heater, or even other makeshift ideas googled on the net can give you a nice hot shower and hot water most of the time. Something as simple as milk jugs painted flat black sitting in the sun to an elaborate setup with an old hot water tank.

CabinBuilder
Admin
# Posted: 4 Dec 2007 10:27 - Edited by: CabinBuilder
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The idea is nice, but my cabin is located in wooded area - there isn't much open sun there. Not sure if this type of solar water heater will do the job.

I was thinking just a dark-painted plastic pale on top of the shower hut...

Vince P
Member
# Posted: 5 Dec 2007 21:57
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I used sunshower from campmor.com all summer and it worked great:
The only drawback is that it takes a few hours to heat up, but it does heat up nice.
More recently, I've "upgraded" to this propane model:
http://cgi.ebay.com/ZODI-PORTABLE-HOT-PROPANE-CAMP-SHOWER-10-000-BTU_W0QQitemZ2501934 81553QQihZ015QQcategoryZ52484QQssPageNameZWDVWQQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem
and built a shower stall under my 50 gallon rain barrel. I haven't had the chance to use this system yet though.
Vince

CabinBuilder
Admin
# Posted: 7 Dec 2007 09:45 - Edited by: CabinBuilder
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Quoting: Vince P
More recently, I've "upgraded" to this propane model

That propane hot water heater looks very interesting. It's an "in-line" water heater (i.e. you don't have to wait).
I was wondering if those 4 "D" cell batteries for the pump are really needed - wouldn't water tank placed above provide enough pressure?

I visited its manufacturer and found several other interesting items - product list.
For example, a hot vent tent heater - it could be not bad idea for small cabins where a wood stove will be overkill.

Vince P
Member
# Posted: 7 Dec 2007 23:03
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Quoting: CabinBuilder
I was wondering if those 4 "D" cell batteries for the pump are really needed - wouldn't water tank placed above provide enough pressure?

Yes, that was my reasoning for building my shower below my rain barrel. I haven't had a chance to try the pump, but the gravity feed does provide the shower with moderate pressure and low pressure to a small sink I have in the cabin. Of course it's all solid right now. I've been thinking about running a line underground into my pond at a depth that won't freeze.
Hmmm... Maybe a little experiment to try this weekend, after a bit of snowshoeing :)

drmargy
Member
# Posted: 20 Dec 2007 01:56
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We live during all seasons at our floating cabin on Powell Lake in British Columbia. We have tied a Zodi Shower which uses a small propane bottle. From June through September we can use the lake for a swim bath, but this winter we installed a bathtub indoors. We heat water on top of our wood stove that is burning all the time anyway and add cold. Since we live on top of a lake water isn't hard to get. If you want to see click here.

tooldudetool
# Posted: 20 Jan 2008 02:29
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URL - I find this small on demand hot water heater more interesting. This Coleman model, while I haven't tried it, has a faucet as well as a shower attachment, which would be quite convenient for dishes or hot water for drinks. It also runs on the typical camping propane canisters and has a rechargable battery for the pump. I plan on buying this model for use at our property...

mikem
# Posted: 4 Feb 2009 23:45
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tooldudetool

I have two of the Coleman models in use for several years now. One I have hooked up to provide a shower in an existing shower stall in my cabin. One is for the kitchen to wash dishes - although I've found that by using an electric tea kettle (elec available) it's a bit easier and leaves more room in the counter. I purchased 6' of 3/8" clear vinyl to make the longer run from the shower "storage tank" - a 7+/- gallon tall kitchen can that gives about 2 good showers before requiring refilling. I built a small shelf to hold the sewing machine sized Coleman unit and it's all fairly compact considering. I keep the lid on the can to keep debris and bugs out, with just a hole cut in for the pump and tubing to run through. I also have a small note pad taped on top and mark down each shower so I donn't get surprised when it's out. I get about 5-6 2.5 - 3.5 gallon showers before it needs to be recharged - not much warning when it's out, it just stops. I plug it in and later on in the day/night it's charged up and ready to go. Sorry, never had the time to watch and time it. I also have a spare battery charged up (available at Home Depot and Lowe's).

These are the difference between being able to use my cabin in the winter and not being able to use it. Mike

Anonymous
# Posted: 1 Mar 2009 18:27
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Vince,
How's it going? Do you know the ways of using rain water to shower with. I have heard that if it goes through heat such a instant hot water propane setup I'm thinking of buying from the Sportsman Guide, that this should kill all the bad things. Do you know if this is true? Also if I setup my solar panel away from my cabin, should I run #10 guage wire to dc appliances or to in verter and then to ac appliances?

Vince P
Member
# Posted: 7 Mar 2009 01:06 - Edited by: Vince P
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Quoting: Anonymous
I have heard that if it goes through heat such a instant hot water propane setup I'm thinking of buying from the Sportsman Guide, that this should kill all the bad things. Do you know if this is true?

No, I don't believe that's accurate. While the water gets hot, it doesn't get "hot enough" and for "long enough" to kill off microorganisms before it hits your skin. I don't typically worry too much about bathing with this setup. But when my wife insists on some type of sterilization, I use the ratio of 25 ml of household bleach in a full 50 gal barrel of water. That is the standard ratio, that makes water safe to drink.
See the pic below for last summer's shower set-up.
sIMGP3193.jpg
sIMGP3193.jpg


MTcabinGirl
Member
# Posted: 7 Mar 2009 15:09
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Great discussion. We have a cabin on a lake here in Montana. We have plenty of water, and we have a gas powered water pump that we fire up every once in a while to pump lake up the hill to a 250G water tank. I am looking for a very simple method of heating water for a bath tub. We would only use it every once in a while - we wash dishes with cold water out of the lake.

I saw something one time where a guy had an open flame heating a copper pipe that he ran water through - we do have propane in 40 pound tanks so we could use that. We also have lots of deadfall that we could run a pipe through some kind of fire.

I have looked at solar systems, but the are slow and any that would do enough water are too expensive. I haven't found any good solutions using Google, but I might not be searching on the right terms.

Any bright ideas?? It would be really great to be able to give the kids a warm bath... and mom wouldn't mind a long soak either :)

islandguy
Member
# Posted: 11 Mar 2009 17:17
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An occasional hot soapy bath was a must for my wife, and something I enjoy occasionally as well. A proper "tankless" system would work quite well if the incoming water isn't to cold to begin with. Coleman has one that is for outdoor use, but has adaptors for a garden hose and a bulk propane cylinder. I have seen it on sale for around $150, although its usually more.
I built, but have not used, a 20 gallon insulated metal tank, with a simple propane burner under it, placed outdoors. When the water is warm enough, I can close my pump suction pipe with a valve, and open another one to the hot water tank, then open the bathtub faucet. My RV pump would then fill the tub with 20 gallons of hot water, for a nice long soak. Again, I havn't tried it, and may yet opt for the on demand type.
Good luck.

islandguy
Member
# Posted: 17 Mar 2009 14:48
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The Coleman model is on sale at Canadian Tire for $150 until March 20. I can't seem to find an answer to my question though:
If the unit is outside my cabin, and the knob is set in the on position, will the burner fire when I turn the water on inside the cabin, or do you have to manually fire the burner after you have water running through it? Also, does the burner turn off when you shut the water flow off?

doc
# Posted: 3 May 2009 10:49
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Hi new here has anyone tried one of the Zodi water heaters? was thinkingof purchasing one myself an it is an great way to go I think personally, if you ahven't seen one look them up on the net... for now i use an black plastic pail to heat my water up during the day...when at he cabin... my cabin is a 10 by 12 homebuilt bascially it was an an shed originainly... anyway the Zodi is an neat little unit designed for camping but also has bigger unit for sale that all run off propane an an small pump to push the water thru the heater.. I origianlly used a water tank built above an wood stove and the water line from it was copper wrapped around the woodstove to heat the water in our old house... worked pretty good but ahd ansecond tank for cold water to mix with it to get our shower temps bareable...anyway this is an interseting forumn will continue to moniter it... thanks for the forumn guys....

Vince P
Member
# Posted: 3 May 2009 18:28
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Quoting: doc
Hi new here has anyone tried one of the Zodi water heaters?

Checked the posts above yours in this thread.

NYChopshop
# Posted: 9 May 2009 21:49
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I believe, if you have the interior space and dont want an electrical water heater, some companies are fitting wood burning stoves with water heating coils built in. These can be operated on a thermosyphon principal which require no electricity to move the heated water. I am considering purchasing a stove from these people, and I'd like to know what anyone thinks about it, for about a 400 square foot interior space, the smaller 380 kitchen queen would make up for the slight inferiority of the insulation in my little cabin.

NYChopshop
# Posted: 9 May 2009 21:50
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URL
This is the link that somehow didn't get posted.

e brown
Member
# Posted: 28 Jul 2009 13:49
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I have a cabin on an island in Maine. There is no running water (spring water from a well) and no electricity. We use 50 pound propane tanks to power the gas stove, gas refrigerator, and gas lights. I am trying to hook up a shower and have a bosch tankless hot water heater. I have a 75 gallon rain barrel that is 15 feet off the ground on a platform.

I believe I need is a solar pump. (I have some experience w/ solar, I have installed a solar panel with a contoller/battery to recharge small electronics but that is about it)

I am wondering if there is a good website that has information on connecting the solar water pump to the tankless hot water heater and any other information I may need. Thanks

littlesalmon4
Member
# Posted: 31 Jul 2009 17:56
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How about using a wood fired hot tub heater. Free heat if you have excess wood around or scrap from building. You could plumb this straight to a tub or an insulated tank. Once the tank was heated to your temp you could pump it to a shower or tub.
http://www.islandhottub.com/woodhtr.html

Paul
# Posted: 3 Aug 2009 19:44
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Did anyone figure out how to use the Coleman instant hot water heater inside? I assume the unit itself has to be mounted outside.

Trigger
# Posted: 19 Nov 2009 16:44
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re: ZODI water heaters. I recently bought one of the larger X-40 models for my cabin.

Up to now, I've just heated water in pot, added cold and used a small 12-v powered pump/hose/switch bought at BassPro. The switch allows on/off of the small pump. (But I doubt the pump would be durable enough for, say, a small family spending an entire summer to use.)

So the step up to the Zodi is a pricey one. But I must say when you open the carton you realize this is one extremely well-made top-quality construction unit.
- both intake and output water hoses are long, and feel durable.
- the alligator-clip cable to attach to 12-V battery.
- the heater unit is thick steel, heavy, but has large handles on each side. Easily moved by 2 people, and not impossibly heavy for 1 adult.
- very stable folding steel legs, with large 'footprints' for stability.
- the propane hose is only a couple feet, but it has regulator and propane bottle connector. All you have to do is supply a 'barbecue grill'-type propane bottle.
- it has AA battery-powered piezo ignition. Even if battery dies it can still be ignited with a match.
- it is instant-on hot water, fine for washing people, dishes. But not hot enough for cooking in.
- comes with very heavy-duty well-made nylon cordura-type storage bag which is watertight and so can be used to hold the cold water supply.

General use:
- Great outdoor unit apparently capable of handling a lot of showers.

- Water must be running thru the unit before you ignite it, and after you turn the propane handle to the off position. I would guess this is to keep the unit from burning out prematurely. [Too bad we mere mortals don't have a switch to do the same ?]

- the 12V line for the water pump has no on/off switch, presumably because of the above need to always have water running through.

- in cold weather areas, they recommend you blow the water line out with air to prevent freezing in the lines after use. I'm not sure yet how critical this is. I would like to leave it in the unheated cabin between visits. If you have a separate 12-V can-run-dry RV water pump, it might be an option to use that to suck out any remaining water in the hot water unit's water lines by briefly closing off or pinching the supply line.

Indoor use?

- I have propane supply lines coming in through exterior wall. [Have not opted for one of those residential size bottles]. Since the propane bottles are permanently outside, with hoses running through the wall to the inside, then during cold seasons I plan to use the hot water unit itself indoors, despite the CO warning labels. As the cabin is well vented, or 'breathes' well, a window is opened a bit; and there is a working CO detector I believe there is no more risk from CO than burning oil lamps or candles. Bears repeating though: never have the propane bottles indoors.

- The top of the unit where it vents will get hot, so the unit must not be confined in any way.

Having said all this, I haven't used the unit yet, but will be in the near future. If it doesn't perform as advertised, or I have problems, I'll post the news.
Happy Trails

lawnjocky
Member
# Posted: 21 Nov 2009 15:31
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I haven't tried this but I have been thinking about wrapping my wood stove flu pipe with 1/2 type L soft copper tubing. Water would run through the system and then to the hot water tap. I think I would have the cold enter at the bottom and the hot exit at the top. I would have a small storage tank with a presure relief valve. There would also be a cold water return from the tank to the beginning of the loop. This would get some thermo syphon action going and hopefully avoid steam related problems. In a pinch it could always be used to distill some White Lightening.

larry
Member
# Posted: 24 Feb 2010 19:56
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for that matter you could coil the tube in the flu if you have a good draft

MikeOnBike
Member
# Posted: 24 Feb 2010 23:30
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Quoting: e brown
I am wondering if there is a good website that has information on connecting the solar water pump to the tankless hot water heater and any other information I may need. Thanks


Upgrade your solar system a little, maybe just add an extra battery and get a 12v RV pump.

http://www.pplmotorhomes.com/parts/rv-pumps-water/flojet-pumps.htm

RiseCabin
# Posted: 22 Mar 2010 15:57
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I have used the Coleman 'Hot Water On Demand' unit in my cabin for showering.

http://www.amazon.com/Coleman-Water-Demand-Portable-Heater/dp/B0009PURE0

After a while it quit working and I had to send it back and get another one. The warranty covered it.

I use a BBQ-size propane tank that sits outside the cabin. A hose runs through the floor to the unit. Works pretty well with the shower head / flexible hose attachment that plugs into the end of the faucet. Would like to experiment with gravity feed instead of the rechargeable-battery-submersible pump. If anyone has tried this with the Coleman heater, post your thoughts/results. Thanks!

MikeOnBike
Member
# Posted: 23 Mar 2010 12:45
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Like Islandguy mentioned make sure that your tankless heater can raise the water temperature up high enough to be comfortable. Most smaller units have a limit on how much they can raise the temperature. If your water source is 50deg. and the heater can only raise it 35deg. then you will at best have an 85deg. shower.

overland
# Posted: 12 Oct 2010 15:38
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I have an ecotemp tankless unit $120. it is an outdoor unit although they make an indoor version.(The Zodi was way too expensive.) I have a small RV 12 V pump with a battery. The tankless is on demand so you can have it outside as I do and place a switch to start the pump. The ign. is 2 D cells the tank is a salvaged 21 gal. RV tank,
The rise is 65deg so I typically have to back it down as its too hot.
Have had it 3 years so far with moderate usage, so far no problems but for the $$ Id buy a spare.

Dougferd
# Posted: 18 May 2011 21:04
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I too have purchased a Bosch tankless water heater and I have been getting some great info from marine supplier - West Marine has a great catalogue for these things. I have purchased a small pump with an expansion tank, some blue and red 1/2" tubing (cold and hot lines), and quick fittings for installation. I will have a small solar panel - 55 watts to help recharge the batteries. I will be hooking this all up when I build my remote cabin this spring. Hope it all works and will try to keep you posted. I have a 35 gal tank (from the marine supplier) that will be above thee bathroom to feed the sink, shower and low-water fluch composting toilet. It will take a little effort to fill the tank each time but I have a 1" tube and a Guzzler hand pump to fill it.

turkeyhunter
Member
# Posted: 18 May 2011 21:44
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i have a solar shower i bought from LL Bean. , you can heat up water on the COLEMAN stove, or top of the wood burner( use a old cooking pot or a kettle). NOT boiling just warm. And pour in the bag---and you have a nice warm shower. And you are not waitng on the sun to warm your solar shower. Simple---and i HAVE TO HAVE A DAILY SHOWER ( at least one) while out hunting/fishing/camping/ or working around the camp.

kreig
# Posted: 22 Jun 2011 17:24
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Overland Said: "I have an ecotemp tankless "

We are looking at the L10 or maybe the FV12. Trying to get some real info to compare models. What model do you have???

What is the true temp rise you get?

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