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Small Cabin Forum / Off-Grid Living / Wood stove questions
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Eddy G
Member
# Posted: 9 Jan 2020 08:35
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Hey all,
We have a DutchWest by Vermont Casting wood stove. I believe it’s a model 2460..non-catalytic converter

This will be it’s third winter.

It doesn’t get a lot of use.
Maybe a dozen or so times a year.

It heats the place up pretty quick and works well as far as I can tell.
I’m still learning how to use it.

As you can see in the picture it’s a fairly tight fit, the pipe runs out the back and directly up the chimney.

I’ve read about regulating the heat with the use of a damper in the pipe.
The damper in the stove (top) is open or closed
“non adjustable” or proportional.

There is no access to the vertical rise of the pipe for a damper and the horizontal run is pretty short.

Can a damper be installed exiting the stove on the horizontal run safely and effectively?

I feel in it’s current state that we waste a lot of wood and I’m looking for ways to keep as much heat in, save some wood and get longer burns.
Especially over night.

Any and all help is greatly appreciated.
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F2CD290DD948443DB.png


ICC
Member
# Posted: 9 Jan 2020 10:33
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Page 17 of the owners manual indicates there is a primary air control lever on the left below the side load door. There is also an integral damper with the control top left of the same side. That is used only for fire startup or for when opening the door to load more fuel. Thirdly there is a secondary air control, also on the left side. Those three controls should be all that is needed. IMO, you do not need to make things more complicated by attempting to install a fourth control device such as a chimney damper. Read the manual, it looks like it has it all covered.

Eddy G
Member
# Posted: 9 Jan 2020 11:52
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I don’t have the secondary air inlet on my stove.
The secondary air inlet over the door only comes on the catalytic converter model.

ICC
Member
# Posted: 9 Jan 2020 13:28
Reply 


OK. I still don't think you need a chimney damper. Limiting the primary inlet air limits how the fire burns. You still have the damper they have listed for the start up and fuel loading, right? That also slows down the rate of burn when in the closed position. It is opened for starting a fire as it shortens the smoke path. Opening the door when that is closed can cause smoke to enter the room too readily as when that damper is closed the smoke path is elongated and makes for slower smoke movement because of the extended path.

Years ago I had a different model VC stove that worked like that and worked very well. No chimney damper

Eddy G
Member
# Posted: 9 Jan 2020 13:58
Reply 


Thanks, the way I understood it was that I HAD to leave the top damper open while the fire was burning.
If closed the top damper the smoke had no way to leave the stove.

Eddy G
Member
# Posted: 9 Jan 2020 14:30 - Edited by: Eddy G
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I wasn’t able to post the pic I wanted but no matter

ICC
Member
# Posted: 9 Jan 2020 14:32
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I have not looked at the stove you have. However, the VC stove I once had had a control that moved a "flap" inside the stove. When open the smoke from the firebox had a straight path up and out the chimney. When closed the smoke had to travel a sideways path that let the stove extract more heat before the smoke went up the chimney. The longer path meant that if a side or front door was opened (with the damper closed) there was a very real chance smoke would take the easy path out the open door. Same as when starting a fire; with the damper closed there would be insufficient draft up the chimney to pull the smoke up the chimney.

I believe your stove should function basically the same. Mine had removable front doors and a screen so it could be operated more like a fireplace. The damper had to be open for that.

Mine was also a non-catalytic version.

Eddy G
Member
# Posted: 9 Jan 2020 14:38
Reply 


Yeah, I’m guessing that’s how it all works.
I have that manual but didn’t actually see that.
The place I bought it from is on the other side of the state. I could call them but a little road trip may give me an excuse to buy a new toy or something

FishHog
Member
# Posted: 9 Jan 2020 17:01
Reply 


I think these guys are right, close that damper to manage your fire once its going (slow the burn).
Not much point in them putting in a damper that you always need to leave open, that wouldn't make a lot of sense to me.

But if your anything like me, you will still forget to open it from time to time before you open the door and get a puff of smoke in the face

Brettny
Member
# Posted: 10 Jan 2020 07:15
Reply 


First off beautiful puppy! My two love there Vermont castings "baby sitter"

You have been burning that stove for 3 years leaving the damper open? Damn you having even begun to feel the heat that stove will throw off.

I have ran VC stoves for 30yrs. I currently heat with a catalytic defiant. You don't need a damper in the pipe. There for a lot cheaper stoves that are basicly a metal box.

If you want more heat make your self an out side air kit. A OAK for short. There very easy to make with an adapter and a piece of aluminum dryer vent. I burn less wood and have a warmer house with an OAK. This VC defiant stove is my primary heat and hasn't gone out for months now.

toyota_mdt_tech
Member
# Posted: 10 Jan 2020 08:14
Reply 


I have a Quadrafire Millennium 3100 flat top, bought new, had it professionally installed and there is no damper on the pipe, I have 2 controls on the stove, one for starting the fire, then one for regulating it. Once fire is going, one comes out, then the other control comes out to close it down. I suspect its controlling incoming air. I have a hole in the floor under the stove, this is my intake air.

beachman
Member
# Posted: 13 Jan 2020 12:46
Reply 


We have almost the exact same stove only an earlier model with the catalytic converter and with some vents that control the burn. I think Fish has it right when he says to close the back damper to get a slower and hotter burn from the gases. Ours works that way but sends the gases to the converter for complete burning efficiency. The burn is slower too. Can't see from your picture but the vent on the lower left might control the air flow to the unit somewhat. Do you have the manual? We have a newer Pacific Energy Vista at another camp that does not have a catalytic converter and burns the gases in an upper chamber when the gases get hot enough.

Eddy G
Member
# Posted: 13 Jan 2020 15:09
Reply 


The manual I have didn’t mention the non catalytic version.

The bottom lever does control the air flow that feeds the fire.
I was using the stove over the week end but it was freakishly warm out (in the 60’s both days) for Jan
Of course now that I’m home it’s 34 deg and snowing 28 deg up at the cabin.
I’m going to try playing with it over the winter and see what I can do..
Thanks everyone, I’ll keep you all posted..

DaveBell
Member
# Posted: 13 Jan 2020 17:24
Reply 


My fireplace has an exhaust damper with three positions; closed, half open, and full open. This is the only flow control.

A modern wood stove has an air intake control to control air flow and a sealed combustion chamber so an exhaust damper is not needed.

Your wood stove is inserted into a fireplace so you cannot get the added heat from a single wall exhaust pipe. Also you may not be able to add an external air kit because of the masonry behind the stove. So your stove is pulling in cold air from around doors and windows for combustion, reducing the heating capability of your stove.

If you want more heat, remove the stove from the fireplace, and install it somewhere else with some single wall pipe connected to double wall pipe at the upper half, and add an external air kit. Contact VC first about improving this situation.

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