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Small Cabin Forum / Cabin Construction / Easy and Cheap Log Cabin
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Stoney
Member
# Posted: 29 Apr 2019 12:59
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My email is braker1@bellsouth.net

Woodscavenger
Member
# Posted: 12 May 2019 14:53
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Shout out to Stoney!!

Had a blast reading this thread. Amazing almost 10 years running. Lots fo great info. I think I am going to use this style for a single pitch (shed roof) cabin. Planning on a 16x24 with a partial 8 or 12’ loft. Heigh of the walls probably 16’ front and 10’ back.

I like the pseudo log look and the simplicity of the linking “log” structures. I also like the look of open timbers and raw lumber rounded logs so was planning on doing a few things.

1) On the interior I am planning on cutting 1/4 rounds depending on the tree diameter and placing those in the corners with liquid nails and timber framing screws screwed in from the outside. I think this wil look cool, seal up any corner air leaks, stabilize the structure.

2) Along with corner posts I will likely put a 1/2 round or D log about very 8 feet along the walls. I will place a D log on top of those which now gives me a super simple support for my loft floor joists.

3) I am thinking about making my cabin in modules as my need for more space changes. I think the “fingers” that stick out. Past the exterior corners could be used to add on in a modular way. Instead of glueing in the additional 2” trim piece under the finger I would just use a couple of screws. Then a year or two from now I can easily remove the trim pieces and now I can slide a new linking log into that space and extend the wall. My exterior wall of the cabin now becomes and interior wall at the new room is added. Using another 1/4 round or D log in the corner should easily strengthen that connection and seal any drafts from that connection.

Can somebody blow holes in my theories or ideas?

Stoney
Member
# Posted: 12 May 2019 15:24
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This sounds like a pretty good plan. I never considered the option of adding on to the ends.
Good thinking.

Woodscavenger
Member
# Posted: 12 May 2019 23:14
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Thanks for the reply Stoney. I have seen this design bounced around another forum. What is the real world experience in terms of heat loss/heat capture and R values. Some people really hammer it but I want to know what the real experience is.

Thanks

Stoney
Member
# Posted: 13 May 2019 07:21
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This is one of the most difficult topics for most people to understand. You can't really think of log cabins in terms of R values. Log cabins for the most part work on terms of thermal inertia or thermal mass. That is the logs absorb the heat or cold and then release it into the air when the heat source is no longer available or on.
Some of the log cabin builders provide an explanation on their web sites.
The biggest culprit for keeping a cabin warm is air infiltration through gaps in the chinking or other areas. I think that my process has addressed this issue better than most.
I send booklets to Northern Canada and Northern Alaska and I haven't had any of those people even ask about R value. Of course you would still need some insulation in the ceiling or attic area.
I hope that this answers your question.

johnniepistol
Member
# Posted: 28 Jul 2019 02:45 - Edited by: johnniepistol
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Stoney Where can i purchase your booklet?

Stoney
Member
# Posted: 28 Jul 2019 06:27
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I can still be reached at:

braker1@bellsouth.net

Blaze
Member
# Posted: 31 Jul 2019 11:18
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Hey Stoney,

I am very intrigued with your style of lumber log construction.
Could you tell me about your ebook that you are offering for sale? How many pages and what is the content? Does it include certain engineering drawings for possible building inspector inquiries?

I am a builder and I hope to build one of these one day for my family.

Would their be a benefit to using pressure treated lumber on the outside 1/3 of the lumber logs? Would there be added protection with the pt lumber on the outside? Then let it dry out a season, and treat it with stain and deck sealer?

Also what about adding a 4" solid concrete block sill or solid concrete sill under the wall perimeter in order to reduce moisture wicking into the bottom logs for further durability?

Im just spit balling and trying to enhance this design for lower maintenance and further durability.

I like the idea of fastening and gluing the logs together with timber panhead screws that are coated as well, for a clean and tight fastening. Also, I wander about a better chinking solution than construction adhesive due to its characteristic of becoming brittle over time, maybe substitute an acrylic based caulking, that would have flexibility through the drying cycle.

I love this idea and by no means am downing it, just trying to figure out a way to help its longevity and viability for people who want a durable and cozy lumber log home.

Blaze
Member
# Posted: 31 Jul 2019 12:14 - Edited by: Blaze
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After reading others post in regards to water intrusion, I feel abother solution would be a modified vertical log construction with battens covering the seams and caulked. You could build a keyed in sill plated to tongue in the vertical logs and the doors and windows could be framed in with headers and cripples to support them, or just key the headers in and have them overlap a foot or so into the log next to the doors or windows. Just a modified idea.

alamodwc
Member
# Posted: 1 Aug 2019 11:51
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Stoney
Do you still have any of your fabricated log plans for sale? Have you changed anything since the first design? Thanks.

Stoney
Member
# Posted: 1 Aug 2019 13:54
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Blaze,
There are several issues with the vertical log idea. First, it no longer looks like a log cabin. Second, it would be more difficult for a novice builder and third the corners may not be strong enough to support the roof.
When it comes to your idea of using PT lumber on the outside you will dramatically increase the cost for very little benefit. If you have a two foot overhang on the roof then water should not be a major factor. Log cabins have lasted over 100 years with a roof like this.
The 4" concrete block is alright if you feel more comfortable about it but a good sill seal will also work to prevent moisture wicking. A concrete block is still porous and can wick moisture.
Your caulking for chinking material should be a the minimum be rated for external use on the outside. That's not as important on the interior.

tyiols
Member
# Posted: 11 Aug 2019 13:29
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It never amazes me how ingenious people can be.... although it never seems like my ideas are that good. Nice looking idea.

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