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Small Cabin Forum / Cabin Construction / Easy and Cheap Log Cabin
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Stoney
Member
# Posted: 29 Apr 2019 12:59
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My email is braker1@bellsouth.net

Woodscavenger
Member
# Posted: 12 May 2019 14:53
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Shout out to Stoney!!

Had a blast reading this thread. Amazing almost 10 years running. Lots fo great info. I think I am going to use this style for a single pitch (shed roof) cabin. Planning on a 16x24 with a partial 8 or 12’ loft. Heigh of the walls probably 16’ front and 10’ back.

I like the pseudo log look and the simplicity of the linking “log” structures. I also like the look of open timbers and raw lumber rounded logs so was planning on doing a few things.

1) On the interior I am planning on cutting 1/4 rounds depending on the tree diameter and placing those in the corners with liquid nails and timber framing screws screwed in from the outside. I think this wil look cool, seal up any corner air leaks, stabilize the structure.

2) Along with corner posts I will likely put a 1/2 round or D log about very 8 feet along the walls. I will place a D log on top of those which now gives me a super simple support for my loft floor joists.

3) I am thinking about making my cabin in modules as my need for more space changes. I think the “fingers” that stick out. Past the exterior corners could be used to add on in a modular way. Instead of glueing in the additional 2” trim piece under the finger I would just use a couple of screws. Then a year or two from now I can easily remove the trim pieces and now I can slide a new linking log into that space and extend the wall. My exterior wall of the cabin now becomes and interior wall at the new room is added. Using another 1/4 round or D log in the corner should easily strengthen that connection and seal any drafts from that connection.

Can somebody blow holes in my theories or ideas?

Stoney
Member
# Posted: 12 May 2019 15:24
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This sounds like a pretty good plan. I never considered the option of adding on to the ends.
Good thinking.

Woodscavenger
Member
# Posted: 12 May 2019 23:14
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Thanks for the reply Stoney. I have seen this design bounced around another forum. What is the real world experience in terms of heat loss/heat capture and R values. Some people really hammer it but I want to know what the real experience is.

Thanks

Stoney
Member
# Posted: 13 May 2019 07:21
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This is one of the most difficult topics for most people to understand. You can't really think of log cabins in terms of R values. Log cabins for the most part work on terms of thermal inertia or thermal mass. That is the logs absorb the heat or cold and then release it into the air when the heat source is no longer available or on.
Some of the log cabin builders provide an explanation on their web sites.
The biggest culprit for keeping a cabin warm is air infiltration through gaps in the chinking or other areas. I think that my process has addressed this issue better than most.
I send booklets to Northern Canada and Northern Alaska and I haven't had any of those people even ask about R value. Of course you would still need some insulation in the ceiling or attic area.
I hope that this answers your question.

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