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rmak
Member
# Posted: 25 May 2014 18:44
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I just want to relate my experience with thieves. A kid we knew robbed our home when we were at work and about six others in the area including his grandparents. Both him and his mother are well known meth addicts. Since he was 17, he was first put on "house arrest" while the sheriff tried to bargain with him to get some of the stolen stuff back. These weren't petty crimes. He took about $10,000 of stuff from us alone. When he couldn't come up with anything, he was put in juvenile detention for a few months till he turned 18 and released.

About six months after his release, he and three other addicts started to rob houses again. This spree lasted until he was caught again. The robberies were big front page news as was his capture.

We just heard he plea bargained to a lesser charge and will be released in three months. So much for justice. The court system appears to be failing us over and over.

I hate thieves, but apparently it's anything goes these days.

woodswoman
Member
# Posted: 26 May 2014 08:03 - Edited by: woodswoman
Reply 


SE Ohio,

I hear you about trespassing vs theft. The trespassers haven't been seen again after they came in, presumably to check their bear bait, only to find notes left by the Department of Natural Resources. Since their ATVs do not have license plates, I am guessing they don't have a hunting permit either. They may have decided it wasn't worth the hassle. The cops have told us they will pay them a visit anyway, which will let them know we have them on camera, but we're prepared to let it go if they don't come back.

My husband was on the property yesterday and got ALL 185 acres posted with yellow disks. He can move fast through the woods. However, he ran across a couple of buys loading wood onto their vehicle. Different bunch... this time stealing our wood! A pretty nasty confrontation ensued, one of the guys threatened him - he was quite drunk. They put the wood back but told him they would come back that evening for it (not the sharpest tool in the shed right?). As soon as they were out of sight, my husband called the RCMP. By the time the guys came down the ATV trail, the mounties were waiting for them. They were apprehended.

So although we are frustrated by how much work it's going to be to secure our property, we think we will get it done eventually. We are very much aware that there will be others and have gotten a steel cable to string across the main entry point. There are cameras all over the property as well as some decoys. They may find one, but they won't find them all! And of course, they may retaliate since many locals have clearly been squatting on the land and using it as their own and therefore, feel it is theirs. We will not invest a lot in fixing the camp until we have secured it well since it will be a target. Of course there are cameras pointing at it (and in several other strategic locations) so should someone decide to burn it down, we will have it on film. It's disheartening, but there is no way we're backing off and letting people ruin this for us.

I do want to say though, that we are not trying to p*** off all the locals, just the thieves and crooks. Since we live in the area and my husband has roots here, including a very well-known uncle who lives very close to our land, we do have friends and have become friends with many more in the area. I agree with posters who point out that if you come in from the city and act like a jerk, you will likely get a reaction. We plan on being very nice to anyone who is respectful, but merciless to those who are not.

Will keep you all posted!

neb
Member
# Posted: 26 May 2014 09:25
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I must be one of the luck one so far. I don't lock up anything and I have had no problems. Land is very remote but do have ranches on 2 sides of me. The only way for someone to get in from there is to go through them and that would be slim. The river on one side and a mile plus trail to get to land and shack. My shack is up a canyon and hard to get to. I hope I never have to worry about locking things up. Having good relations with bordering people is a very good thing!!

toyota_mdt_tech
Member
# Posted: 26 May 2014 10:45
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I've had great relations with my neighbor, one is general who watches the place like a hawk and you cant drive to mine without going past his and all roads are private, members/guess only and well posted. So far, no issues. I'm in the process of barbwire fencing the entire 20 acres, should be all finished early summer. But now buying the adjacent 20 acres, so will eventually fence that in also. I am fortunate to have had no issues. It either has to be so remote or close in with people around to avoid issues it seems.

Pookie129
Member
# Posted: 1 Jun 2014 17:33
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Dear Woodswoman, I am also new to cabin - acreage land ownership and your post prompted me to write. I happened to read something on this forum yesterday that may be relative. Someone mentioned that locals may have used or hunted your land for generations, almost feeling like it is a birthright and unfortunately, it may take a while for you and your husband to break or change that local mentality, but from the postings and information on this site - it can be done (for the most part, nothing in life is perfect - except cabin life of course..lol).

Sounds like there may also be some of this going on too - and hopefully these recent events, and your diligence in handling these matters should elevate this problem for you and you can enjoy your little slice of heaven with minimal intrusion

We just got our cabin property and I have been visiting it weekly or biweekly, just checking in as best I can (and still trying to fathom that i own this amazing little spot) and I came across a young man accessing the/my property from the river. He seemed just as startled as i did but after introducing myself as the owner and asking if I could help him, he seemed confused and introduced himself. Before long he had told he where he lived and worked in town - so the next time, I was passing through I dropped by his work with a coffee (the town is about 30 minutes away from the cabin, so it is a little out of the way but in order to prove a point..lol) - he was just as startled to see me at his job (probably almost as startled as I was to find out he actually worked there) and I just wanted to make the point that although he knew where the cabin was, I knew where he worked and wasn't shy about driving out of my way (and since he was seemingly honest about that, he was probably being honest about the area he lived in as well)...I think you get the point, much like I am hoping this young man did and the message he will tell the other people who might use my property to access the river from this point. I have a feeling that he will probably come by and ask permission now going forward, which I would have no problem with (a few land use rules aside..lol).

Congrats and enjoy.
Shayna

bobrok
Member
# Posted: 1 Jun 2014 18:22 - Edited by: bobrok
Reply 


Quoting: Pookie129
I dropped by his work with a coffee...he will probably come by and ask permission now going forward, which I would have no problem with (a few land use rules aside..lol).

I think this was a smart, insightful, intelligent, and very cool move on your part! Nice move!
I see you're in Canada. Not to go O/T but in New York State there is a whole slew of new lawsuits being played out back and forth in court over the navigability of otherwise public waterways through privately owned properties. A newspaper editor purposefully canoed past a cable barrier strung across a stream (thus avoiding a 1/4 mile carry) and documented it to test the state's navigability vs. private ownership laws. Still in the courts and probably will be counter-sued back and forth for a generation.
I'm not advocating pro or con for the law, but you don't know if your new friend made an error or was testing the waters, so to speak, nor do I know if this is even an issue in Canada.
That being said, I think you made a cool move, but be careful.
bob

Pookie129
Member
# Posted: 1 Jun 2014 19:30
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Thanks Bob - I hesitated but I thought it best to start being diligent or present right from the get go.

What he had told me was that - he sometimes used the bank on the edge of my property as an exit point as it was easier to portage across my property then to paddle down to the actual public access point. He was honest and said he was just being lazy and he also said he didn't like having to navigate with all the other people at the public access (which I took to mean non locals..lol).

I am in a fortunate position as my property goes all the way back to the river (which is my southern boundary) and the other side is all crown land but protected crown land with no public entry ways and the other side is privately owned all by one person.

At some point - water, water ways, systems, etc either is or will become a hot topic for everyone (fracking, energy, drinking, watering, farming, etc).

I am hoping that I can develop a friendly relationship with locals, and make sure that everyone is aware that I am around, present and willing to engage and reach out (both positively and protectively) and perhaps that will help minimize random acts of vandalism and theft.

Thanks for the kind words
Shayna

RiverCabin
Member
# Posted: 3 Jun 2014 14:29
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Quoting: bobrok
Not to go O/T but in New York State there is a whole slew of new lawsuits being played out back and forth in court over the navigability of otherwise public waterways through privately owned properties. A newspaper editor purposefully canoed past a cable barrier strung across a stream (thus avoiding a 1/4 mile carry) and documented it to test the state's navigability vs. private ownership laws. Still in the courts and probably will be counter-sued back and forth for a generation.


Navigability is a big issue whenever you own property with frontage on a river or stream. In Missouri, where I live and where my cabin is located, the issue of navigability has long ago been decided in the courts. Basically, I cannot prevent people from traveling in the river but I can bar them from accessing the river through my property. I am quite ok with this but some landowners aren't. Last summer a confrontation between canoers and a landowner played out with deadly results. As of a few weeks ago, the landowner has been found guilty of murder.

http://dailyjournalonline.com/news/local/crime-and-courts/updated-story-meramec-shoot er-found-guilty/article_1447a4c4-155a-11e3-a09f-001a4bcf887a.html

The river where the above occurred is not where my cabin is located and that river, the Meramec, has many canoe concessions. I can somewhat sympathize with the landowner as the rivers with high canoe traffic also suffer from tremendous amounts of littering and generally stupid behavior. I DO NOT feel that he was justified in any way of shootings the victim. Further, under Missouri law, he couldn't order them to leave the gravel bar.

woodswoman
Member
# Posted: 4 Jun 2014 07:49
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Hi Shayna, I agree with the others - great move on your part! Being a fellow canadian, I think this will be fairly effective. The message has been sent.

We are also finding the traffic is decreasing as we put up signs throughout the property but with 185 acres to cover, it is no easy task! The previous tresspassers caught on camera have not returned yet. Hopefully they have gotten the message as well.

But no sooner do we shut down one entry point that another pops up somewhere else. We put a steel cable across what we thought was the main entry point, coming off an ATV/snowmobile trail, and no sooner had we locked it, along came 12 ATVs right through our property, looking to exit through it! We had a talk with them - the leader in the front seemed like a decent guy, and had just come off the power line (more on that in a sec) so we told him we'd let them through this once, but that this property was closed to traffic. We had to put a ton of flagging tape on the cable itself and strung more flagging tape about 20 ft in front and behind it (in case they come either way) to avoid some idiot hanging himself on it. My husband is also picking up those reflective triangles you put on farm machinery to stick on the cable in case they come through at night. We also put up more signage and a camera watching the whole thing. We expect we will find it tampered with at some point.

Which brings me to our new problem - truck bogging through our property using the power line. We have a power line running through a pretty good chunk of our property and have realized, mostly by trolling Facebook and YouTube, that there is a group of "mud boggers" that relishes spinning their tires in the mud and generally destroying and littering your property. We have some pictures - again, taken right off Facebook since these people are too stupid and brazen to realize they're bragging about illegal activities on the Internet - which clearly show them on our property! So we have sent them off to police and to our power corporation and are asking them to put up signs clarifying the fact that they only have an easement on our property, which means they can access it (and they are obligated to notify us when they do) but no one else can other than the landowners. There seems to be a belief out there that these power lines are public property. Luckily, we have friends high up in the power corporation that have been alerted and are very concerned about these activities. In they end, they may be liable for opening this "highway" and creating the problem so they need to act on it. We'd love to see them gait these wide swaths of open land, but that will not happen so we'll have to settle for signs and some off-road vehicle enforcement.

The most hearbreaking part is that we have pictures showing them tearing up our beaver pond with their big trucks. Not surprisingly, I have found a lot of empty beer cans in the exact same area. And we wondered why the beavers had left the pond...

So yes, we've come to realize that it will be a lot of work to secure this land. In the meantime, it doesn't seem like a good idea to fix up the camp since it could be up in flames in one drunk night of revenge. It also makes me slightly nervous to be on the property by myself, but I will not back down. My view now is that we have a lot of work to do, but in the end, we have the opportunity to reclaim and protect this beautiful piece of land so that it can once again be a quite refuge for ourselves and for wildlife. I believe it will all be worth it in the end...

Oh, and RiverCabin, that story is horrific! We have two brooks on our property, but no rivers, luckily. Instead, we have this damn power line, which may be worse.

woodswoman
Member
# Posted: 4 Jun 2014 07:53
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I should add, in case other Canadians are interested, that this kind of disruptive "mud bogging" activity through waterways is illegal and punishable by prison. I imagine the US has similar laws. You can imagine the havoc it wreaks on the environment for them to take their big monster trucks and ram them through a beaver pond. Of course, what they're doing is illegal on many levels. Lucky for us, they're not too bright and we have their big smiles holding a can of beer standing next to their trucks on our land as proof of their stupidity.

hattie
Member
# Posted: 4 Jun 2014 12:49
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Quoting: Pookie129
he seemed confused and introduced himself. Before long he had told he where he lived and worked in town - so the next time, I was passing through I dropped by his work with a coffee (the town is about 30 minutes away from the cabin, so it is a little out of the way but in order to prove a point..lol) - he was just as startled to see me at his job (probably almost as startled as I was to find out he actually worked there) and I just wanted to make the point that although he knew where the cabin was, I knew where he worked


Amazing!!! That was a really smart thing to do. All done in a non-confrontational manner, yet I am sure you got your point across! You are a genius!

woodswoman: I am from Canada too (B.C.) and while my husband and I enjoy using our ATV, we have seen the terrible damage caused by mud bogging! What a stupid ***** to see how much of a mess and how much destruction you can cause! I wish you luck getting things under control with the trespassers on your property!!!

Pookie129
Member
# Posted: 4 Jun 2014 22:41
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WW, that is unfortunate but I am glad that you have some video evidence to support or provide to hopefully see some action taken.

197 acres is a lot of land to secure, maintain and work, but hats off to you for the efforts this far.

You will get this sorted out eventually, but in the meanwhile - to appease the boggers, maybe you could talk to your friends with the power corp and see if they have any available land not with easements onto private land for these boggers to get their ya ay's out. Seems a small price to pay to make land owners happy and give the boggers some already chewed up power land to run amuck (pun intended). Win Win for all as the boggers will be advocates for power and less resentful for losing or having to give up their current stomping grounds (It sucks that land owners have to make additional concessions or sacrifices for other people but sometimes it can work out in the long run). Just a thought, maybe a little too compromising but you might find yourself with a few more soldiers in keeping your land secure in that they will spread the word and you will have earned a certain amount of respect or understanding for trying to replace their fun but without having your land wrecked and the wildlife upheaved.

I also agree with hattie, I enjoy atv, snowmobiles, etc but I have also seen some do real damage and it is unfortunately for everyone.

Keep up the good work

silverwaterlady
Member
# Posted: 5 Jun 2014 00:58
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How about the boggers do that crap to their own land? Maybe they should run a hose out to their yard, create a mud hole and bog away.

woodswoman
Member
# Posted: 5 Jun 2014 17:55
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hattie: we enjoy riding our ATV's through our property too, and I understand that it is an enjoyable activity, but too many people are being disrespectful and ruining it for all.

Pookie and silverwaterlady, they have a place to do their mud bogging already. They hold events in this large pit which is owned by some of the most avid "mudders" in the area. But they are always looking for new adventures and new locations, thus, our problem. Luckily the power corporation has taken it very seriously. They have had meetings and have promised immediate action.

We do expect habits to change slowly, but remain optimistic that, for the most part, we will be able to reclaim our land.

Will keep you all posted on progress.

cabinbiscuits
Member
# Posted: 7 Jun 2014 08:37
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Well we finally got hit up at our camp too. My dog and I went up to camp last Sunday to just check on things since I haven't been up there much this spring and I discovered that some fine persons stole the wheels and tires (I even had wheel locks on the thing but somehow they got inside and found the key), and battery out of our camp Jeep Grand Cherokee. They just dropped it in the dirt when they were done. They also stole a hitch mounted hook from the front bumper and a hitch mounted clevis from the rear bumper as well as a come-along from inside of the Jeep. Had to have happened over the last month since my son was just up there the beginning of May and the Jeep was fine then.

So I bought another battery and some more wheels and tires and went back up this week to get the thing running again. When I get it up out of the dirt and start it up, I find out that they also took a sawzall and cut the catalytic converter and tailpipe out from under it as well.

After about a $1400 loss, now I'm searching for a shipping container to park the Jeep in so this can't happen again. At least they didn't break into my building for the time being.

rmak
Member
# Posted: 7 Jun 2014 08:49
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Sorry to hear about that cabinbiscuits. That's the pain that lingers with a break-in/theft. You don't know exactly what was taken. Even almost two years from our home being robbed, I still can't find things that I know I had. Maybe they are misplaced, maybe stolen. It's just an added hassle in life. Also the collateral damage. Thieves will just break something rather than spend the few seconds to remove a wanted item from it. We had irreplaceable things broken apparently because the guy thought they might contain something of value to him. sad and maddening at the same time.

cabinbiscuits
Member
# Posted: 7 Jun 2014 10:05
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Sad---
Jeep.JPG
Jeep.JPG


neb
Member
# Posted: 7 Jun 2014 18:08 - Edited by: neb
Reply 


I feel for the ones that have had problems. There is nothing worse then a thief!! Just talked to a rancher and he said someone stole 9 calves from him They went to round up cattle to brand and 9 calves missing. Pretty hard to find them now with out a brand.

woodswoman
Member
# Posted: 1 Jul 2014 16:43
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Quick update: tresspasser traffic has slowed to almost nothing on our huge woodlot since we've put up signs indicating the property is under camera surveillance. Not to mention a gazillion generic NO TRESSPASSING signs and three large STOP signs the power corporation had made for us indicating that although the power line runs through our property, they still need permission from the landowner to come on it. There is a local misconception that power lines are public property when they're actually easements. Anyway, tonight my husband went out to check and the wire cable we strung across the main access road had been broken. The odd thing is that the tracks stop a few feet beyond it - we had strung flagging tape across the road about 20 feet before and after the wire to avoid being responsible for some idiot hanging himself and they didn't break it. I guess they saw the sign with the camera symbol and decided to get off our property fast! Unfortunately, our camera did not catch it this time, but we've made some adjustments so next time, the vandals won't be so lucky.

cabingal3
Member
# Posted: 4 Jul 2014 12:34
Reply 


up at our woods we have some new people that are stealing its reported.
and..its reported they are making drugs.
they have been threatening nice residents out there with threats to blow their heads of.
soo the good people called the cops.they wont come out that far unless something really happens.
i love this that no one wants to come out there.its like the wild west and we are all living our own versions of our own personal freedoms.
i would never tell on anyone out there cause we all have ideas of what we feel is free but-no.i dont want druggies out there making drugs.
so the good people got together to decide what to do about this situation.
the one fella out there has a huge radio tower in his yard.they all got together to hand out ham radio hand held devices for all to have.not the bad guys.so we are to tune into channel 3.i was not there .a friend out there told us what went on at this meeting.i asked but who are we calling when these bad ones give us trouble when we tune into chaneel 3.
i was told "whoever answers?".what if its the bad guys?
well the other solution is shoot your gun three times in the air.i think there goes target practice.hee hee.
soo.people are trying to deal with these issues.
looking out for our neighbors is about the best we can do.
cant wait to live out there to see what really goes on.

nmcbride
Member
# Posted: 17 Jul 2014 10:38 - Edited by: nmcbride
Reply 


Has anyone tried using a cellular alarm dialer to call your friendly neighbors? They (or an alarm company) could respond to your cabin pretty quickly in the event a burglar was detected. I would that, in conjunction with hidden camera(s) and warning signs should deter most thieves, and if a break in did happen the hidden camera should hopefully help with the aftermath.

I'm looking at this one - http://www.absoluteautomation.com/dakotaalert/mini-dvr/index.html - seems cheap, easy and reliable.

woodswoman
Member
# Posted: 18 Jul 2014 07:47
Reply 


cabingal3 and nmcbride - in our case, there are no neighbors. Our cabin is on a 185 acre woodlot surrounded on all sides by plots of land just as large owned by forestry companies. No neighbors to come to the rescue! So we need deterrents. Cameras seem to do the trick.

As for the cops, they may not come out to the property itself, but if we have camera evidence of tresspassing, they will investigate. So far, we have been able to identify every person caught on camera by asking around (we live in the area, so we know the locals). Basically, we deliver a name and photo to the cops so their job is pretty easy from there on. Don't get me wrong, it's unlikely anyone will get prosecuted for tresspassing, but since most of these people are conducting other illegal activities, they aren't too keen on the cops knocking on their doors.

Still, we worry about someone burning down the camp in revenge one of these days...

woodswoman
Member
# Posted: 18 Jul 2014 07:54
Reply 


One more thing about cameras - not sure if this applies to the one you are looking at nmcbride, but you should find out. Cameras that take night time pictures (which, of course, is essential to catching thieves and vandals) use a flash. What do you think is going to happen when that thief sees a flash coming from a nearby tree? Down goes your camera. He is not going to leave it there as evidence.

There are cameras that can be put on stealth mode. The flash is not visible. There are also cameras that will email you pics and videos, but they require an Internet connection (which we don't have). Our solution is a camera with a stealth flash which stores the photos in a remote box hidden a few feet away (no Internet connection required for this). The camera can be taken, but the photos aren't in it. We can still retrieve them and (bonus) catch the person who took down the camera too! Another option to consider: using decoy cameras. My husband has a couple that don't work anymore so those are more visible than the real ones. The thieves will think they got rid of the evidence, but in reality, they got a decoy. Also, in some sites, we have more than one camera set up. This has required some investment in cameras, but we feel it's worth it.

toyota_mdt_tech
Member
# Posted: 18 Jul 2014 08:51 - Edited by: toyota_mdt_tech
Reply 


Cameras use infra red flash, not visable at all. But the phto will be grayish looking.

I purchased an eye trax unit, http://eyetrax.net/ spendy, use cell service, unfortunately, I was too far in the fringe of the coverage and it didnt work as reliably as I'd like it too.

KinAlberta
Member
# Posted: 5 Aug 2014 03:22 - Edited by: KinAlberta
Reply 


It's 1 am for me, so just some quick comments. We've had maybe five or six break ins over 40 years. No great loss or damage.

We have 10 buildings including two old outhouses. All with different locks until one year I opened the wallet and got al new matching keyed locks. That winter every building was broken into, the locks cut off, and now we're back to carrying a fist full of keys. during the last breakin, they hammered their way through a garage door that would have fallen over had they just leaned against it. RCMP have told us not to beef up door security or they'll just make their own door or do more damage. So we do next to nothing and only keep crappy stuff at the lake.

I like the idea of hidden rooms, hidden storage boxes, etc. and cameras, especially the decoy cameras.

...Or don't put up any cameras and instead put up signage saying "video surveillance". Make them wonder where the heck the cameras are. . ...or put a horn up high on a post or roof , way out of reach, and run fake wires to make it look connected. Mark it "#3".

Park an old vehicle in the yard to make them wonder if the place is occupied.

Put the best lock on an empty shed (or one containing something weird or heavy, say rocks sprayed with a touch of gold paint) with an obviously beefed up door and frame etc. and let them spend their energy breaking into it and hopefully hauling off your rock collection. (Or course they'll later return and burn your whole place down.)

When you leave for the season, put tacky looking covers on the furniture and bring out all of grandmas frilly collectibles, Bric--brac, velvet art or whatever to scare off even the most desperate teens.

On my house in the city I put a glass insert in my attached garage's man door. For security I put lexan on it but I put it on the inside side so that someone would have to make noise and expend effort before encountering the lexan. They may still get in, but I'll make them work a bit for it.

Anyone leave a radio or TV playing while they are away? We never have, but it's tempting.


Bottom line, were not very concerned about breakins. Would hate vandalism though. Above all though, my worry is guys lurking around in the dark when we are there, asleep. Any ideas? As a kid, my father wouldn't go out there without taking a shotgun with him. Guns are out for us. However in our trailer I try to keep a charged million candle power flashlight.

Pookie129
Member
# Posted: 5 Aug 2014 05:56
Reply 


All good and sound advice and I greatly appreciate that people continue to post and write about their experiences. Always something to learn from each entry.

As far as protection against creepy people lurking around in the dark - without guns (I would also imagine that ninja's aren't in the budget?) My inexperienced suggestions:
Both wood and metal baseball bats - you can run comparative studies and draw up some pros and cons about either application in action or course of duty.

Golf clubs- although I don't know many serious golfers willing to utilize their favourite clubs for this experiment in cabin security but you never know.

Lawn Darts - Horseshoes: one will either pierce you or knock you into next week.

More serious things - crossbow/bows, flare guns, pellet guns, air guns, paintball gun, sling shots, I know all forms of guns or ammo throwing mechanisms

Knives - but you better know how to use it before you get all navy seal fancy.

Dogs - I prefer dogs over llama's, bison or buffalo (although size wise, and not given a dog as an option, I would back the buffalo in a size fight ) but dogs definitely serve a purpose on many levels.

Motion sensor (solar) lights tripped to a 20 - 30 foot radius but you will get some animal activity as well.

There are other electronic type fencing and security measures one could take but I am sure you are aware of the many options in this category.

CaptCanuck
Member
# Posted: 6 Aug 2014 10:56
Reply 


I'm planning on chaining 50-100 lbs of old free weight plates to my generator. My property is hilly and water access only, so if they want my stuff they will have to work for it and carry it out of there.

The idea of hidden storage boxes away from the main buildings has appeal too.

I agree with one of the previous posters that heavy locks on doors will only mean a broken window or other damage as a means of entry. Sad but true.

I think a "video surveillance" sign is a good idea, either as a bluff, or along with some trail cams.

cabingal3
Member
# Posted: 9 Aug 2014 09:40
Reply 


just called our buddy who lives near us in the woods.he cant see our place from where he is at.
He did tell me this.they (all the good neighbors)finally did get a sheriff to come out to talk to them about what to do with bad ones who steal,start fires and are general scalawags.
so to get law enforcement involved is not what i wanted but at least they know what is going on...not that they will be coming out that far to our woods...
i still dont know what they all decided but we are headed to the cabin soon to find out what we are suppose to do.so at least there is new info for us.

cabingal3
Member
# Posted: 17 Aug 2014 13:18
Reply 


soo.there was a meeting and the cops came.we found out more this weekend.
by a different source.
people who are fed up with stealing asked the cops-"can we tie the culprit up to a tree and wait for u?"...the answer is no u cant.lol.
u can only do something if u really feel your in deadly bodily harm.
hmm.
to me tying a bad guy to a tree is alot less horrific than other options. i guess not.
then they tried to figure out if we have an home owners association.so funny.if they do -we have never seen one.nor our neighbors.when we bought the land.no one every told us this or had us sign anything about an HOA.
so to me-that means theres none.

RichInTheUSA
Member
# Posted: 17 Aug 2014 14:27
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I'd ask a lawyer rather than a policeman. The answer you got is typically the answer for the question "can I hold someone at bay with a firearm, and wait for the police to come?".

Also, you mileage will vary depending on the country and state you live in.

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