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Small Cabin Forum / General Forum / Slippery Gravel Driveway- Cheap Fix?
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SE Ohio
Member
# Posted: 10 Aug 2017 12:43
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Driveway slope up the hill is about 20%, and has a recent (spring) application of 067 gravel (recommended by hauler). Recent application due to sinking of tracks/bottoming out on center strip.

Problem is, the gravel isn't locking in. My vehicle (even with traction control) needs a running start on the flat portion of the driveway to get up the hill, and if vehicle bounces a bit the tires spin and create ruts. I'm frequently re-raking the driveway smooth. A friend stopped by and had to work 10 minutes to get up my 110' driveway! I wasn't home for the amusement, unfortunately. I did later have to get my rake out, though, which would have amused him.

I've added smaller gravel from "extra gravel" pile (picture) to attempt to lock in the 067, that helps minimally.

Each dump truck visit is $$$, don't really want to keep adding money to the "gravel pit".

Is it just a matter of time for the gravel to set? Or should I add the local crappy clay soil from the hillside to lock in the gravel? Other cost effective solutions? I have no tractor, etc, just hand tools and a van.
Driveway with 067 gravel and leaves
Driveway with 067 gravel and leaves
Smaller gravel and small helper
Smaller gravel and small helper
Extra gravel
Extra gravel


bldginsp
Member
# Posted: 10 Aug 2017 16:12
Reply 


Grade, water, compact. But with that slope I think you will always have a problem. Ultimate solution is to re-route the driveway along the hillside to one side and switchback up at a lower grade.

There is some kind of web netting that they make to put on inclines like this, made to hold stuff together as you drive over it. Forget the name. I don't have much confidence in a solution like that, but I've never seen it.

snobdds
Member
# Posted: 10 Aug 2017 16:17
Reply 


You need to get some fines mixed in with the gravel. Here they call it 3/4 minus, which means angular pieces of 3/4 rock and stone dust. The angular rock locks in better and the stone dust fills the gaps and sets everything in. After a few years the driveway should be as hard as concrete.

Greenland South
Member
# Posted: 10 Aug 2017 20:31
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SE Ohio

You're likely fighting a loosing battle without some sort of grading equipment. Any of your neighbors own a tractor and box blade or land leveler? That driveway could be looked after in pretty short order with the right equipment.
By your name I'm assuming you're from Ohio. Try going on "tractor by net". It's another forum. Lots of members on there from your neck of the woods. You can likely find someone on there to help you out. Likely less expensively than adding truckload after truckload of material.

morock
Member
# Posted: 10 Aug 2017 21:02
Reply 


Went through the same problem for years, finally paved the worst 120 feet. Best money I've spent on the place. Mine looks steeper than yours though, I would try a couple of loads of "road base" they call it here. Its 3 inch and smaller stone, locks really well, doesn't wash out easy and holds you up in the squishy places too. Its one of the cheapest loads you can get around here too. The truck can spread it if you have a good driver and rake out the rest before it rains. One other tip, stay away from recycled asphalt, doesn't work on steep hills. Trust me on that one.

DaveBell
Member
# Posted: 10 Aug 2017 22:11
Reply 


Looks like the leaves haven't been cleared in years. Gravel too small. You may have too much slope for standard vehicle differential. I have the same situation. I keep the leaves cleared off. I put down three inch gravel. And still have to use 4x4. So start by clearing your leaves and putting large gravel in the right track.

Smawgunner
Member
# Posted: 10 Aug 2017 22:13
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Crushed 57 may have been a better choice.

Littlecooner
Member
# Posted: 11 Aug 2017 11:57
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Quoting: snobdds
snobdds


snobdds is correct. Old retired civil engineer here with decades of road building and maintenance experience. Your 67's will never settled down. no fines to stabilize the rolling. I see this all the time with these dumb truck drivers telling people to put washed stone on the driveways. There are two crushers at a quarry, the primary and the secondary (most operations). The product coming from the secondary crusher is called "crusher run" and is the produce used to wash and grade the different size stones for sale. 67's are a combination of # 6 and # 7 size stones. It cost money to wash and grade the crusher run to these different products so the product called crusher run is always less expensive that the washed product. In my part of the world, we have limestone rock. the crusher run is usually 1 inch size stone and down, all the way to fine dust. these fines stabilize the larger stones and once places, compacted and with sufficient rain fall, this stuff sets up just like concrete, With your steep slope, if you will grade it to keep the rainfall running off the surface very quickly and put down some crusher run, you can construct a drive way that is very similar to concrete. The existing 67's can be used as a base, it may be that you need a very good layer over them to be able to stabilize the entire road way. Sorry for your problem, you hauler is a dumb ****. That is why he is driving a truck instead of designing roads.

AK Seabee
Member
# Posted: 17 Aug 2017 00:29
Reply 


Are you able to get RAP (Recycled Asphalt) from the plant? RAP has the right combination of fractured stone and fines and does well in wet conditions. In Alaska RAP is comparable in price to D1 however it holds up better in wet conditions.

hdhp
Member
# Posted: 17 Aug 2017 12:50
Reply 


I have had good luck with 23A Limestone... It has sharp edges and locks together very good! Remember round stone or gravel will Never Lock. Sorry you had to learn the hard way.

SE Ohio
Member
# Posted: 9 May 2020 11:23
Reply 


These turf stone blocks are about $3 USD per foot at Menards. I’ve set them on only the sunken side of driveway.. No more spinning gravel!

I also used one on my cabin path. A heavy rain would often result in a torrent washing gravel down my steps. The turf stone and gravel base underneath provide good drainage. No more overflow cleanup.

SE Ohio
Turf stone on path steps
Turf stone on path steps


SE Ohio
Member
# Posted: 9 May 2020 11:28 - Edited by: SE Ohio
Reply 


Driveway paver turfstone
Turf stone
Turf stone


toyota_mdt_tech
Member
# Posted: 9 May 2020 16:39 - Edited by: toyota_mdt_tech
Reply 


You need gravel that contains "fines"

Crusher Run 5/9

Called "Quarry Process or Crusher Run" is another good option for the top level of a driveway or walkway. Composed of a blend of smaller crushed stone and stone dust, crusher run typically includes a higher percentage of stone dust fines.

As the gravel settles, the dust seeps into the spaces between the gravel and compacts, forming a smooth, semisolid surface. If you use quarry process stone in your project, it is essential to crown the driveway—grade it so that the middle is slightly higher than the sides—to ensure that rainwater will drain properly and also to reduce damage to the driveway.

It should look like this.
Crusher Run
Crusher Run


AKfisher
Member
# Posted: 9 May 2020 17:40 - Edited by: AKfisher
Reply 


Pave it. Or get recycled asphalt. Spread it, water it, roll/compact it.

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