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Small Cabin Forum / Cabin Construction / mud tire bridge?
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optimistic
Member
# Posted: 12 Sep 2021 18:34
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Not sure how to call these...

I have really bad spots with deep mud. My Pathfinder 08 hits its bottom there.. Haven't got stuck yet (pathfinder is quite capable with 4x4) but I want to address it.

Was thinking instead of dumping stone which might run me 2k to just build some of those bridges just for my wheels to go on....

Especially now with price of wood dropping.

Anyone done that? Any photos or good guide?

gcrank1
Member
# Posted: 12 Sep 2021 18:43 - Edited by: gcrank1
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In the old days around here they built corduroy roads through the swamps.
Ive heard that a thick layer of straw was used as a base because it doesnt rot down like hay does (tho coconut fiber would be even better), then the locust, oak, or other slow to rot wood when deprived of oxygen layed down.
I dont know, Im not that old.....
On a small scale maybe a straw layer, then hardwood branches in a cross-cross, then some landscape fabric covered with gravel might work. The idea is to get the water out of the top where you drive and give it a chance to perc instead of making mid.

darz5150
Member
# Posted: 12 Sep 2021 21:55
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Before we got the new road put in. We would fill in the low spots with wood chips that I could get for free from a guy that used to work for me that has a tree service.

ICC
Member
# Posted: 12 Sep 2021 22:26
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How long are the trouble spots? How many? Both left and right tracks at same time?

optimistic
Member
# Posted: 13 Sep 2021 07:04 - Edited by: optimistic
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I will measure next time but probably 2 sections. each about 20-25ft long.

If I drop stone - much will get swallowed in the middle so I will need many loads. With mini bridges - I only put it where I need it...

gcrank1 - I looked up corduroy road. That is not what I plan to do. I plan to make two bridges that will just carry my wheels. My tires are 275 so that is about 10" so maybe two 16-20" wide bridges.

optimistic
Member
# Posted: 13 Sep 2021 07:43
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Thinking about 3 pieces of 2x4 pressure treated. Running them like a joist. Then putting a pieces perpendicular on the bottom to set the distance between them to be 20" (each bridge). Then using 2x6 pt pieces to posts maybe every 3ft? 4ft?

Then maybe on the top I connected metal or chicken wire to help with traction.

Cost wise seems to be very cheap vs stone with backhoe guy

Steve_S
Member
# Posted: 13 Sep 2021 07:59
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Prep the bed for the road by clearing organics off and making sure you have a solid base, then lay ROAD CLOTH which is a very heavy duty geotextile then dump your gravel & rock ontop of that... it will keep it from separating and sinking into the ground below at random.

https://www.mainlinematerials.com/blogs/mainline-materials-blog/installing-driveway-f abric-a-helpful-illustrated-guide

https://www.cherokeemfg.com/product/road-stabilization-fabrics/

WILL1E
Member
# Posted: 13 Sep 2021 08:40
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Alot of local auctions here sell those timbers connected with a cable that they use for construction sites and heavy equipment...can't think of the proper term. Anyways, those go for pretty reasonable...you'll need a way to haul and lay them out, but something to consider.

littlesalmon4
Member
# Posted: 13 Sep 2021 10:56
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have a look around. Not sure about your area but you may be able to find some used rig mats.

snobdds
Member
# Posted: 13 Sep 2021 11:45
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pipeline mats. 4x4 bolted together. Heavy and lots of material, but they work



NorthRick
Member
# Posted: 13 Sep 2021 12:13
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Geofabric then gravel (or pit run which is cheaper) on top. Worth the money in the long run. Been there done that.

optimistic
Member
# Posted: 13 Sep 2021 13:16 - Edited by: optimistic
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WILL1E - any chance you can send a link to one or find the name? I will look into that.

littlesalmon4 - Will check that out. Thanks for the tip!

snobdds - are those something that are premade and can buy them used? never seen such a thing

NorthRick - I did that before. Held for 5 years and not very well but it gotten really bad the last year when I started going again. Anyhow... it was expensive. A load here delivered is $400. I'll need 3-4 min if not more. Plus guy to spread them. I am looking at 2k-3 easy.

Ground contact pt to build these will probably not be more than $800 and might last... forever if built right?

optimistic
Member
# Posted: 13 Sep 2021 13:35
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Another, less construction involved -

4x6 pt.... Those I can just place on the ground, drill holes and put those galvanized spike so they don't move around... Then if I see that they are spanning in some place more than 4ft I will just put some support?

travellerw
Member
# Posted: 13 Sep 2021 13:49
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Around here we call what you are looking for "Rig Mats". Sold at auction, but often as a group (like 5 of them). Pretty heavy and they require equipment and a semi truck/trailer to haul them.

I second the Geo fabric and Geo net (important). When done properly you will never have to redo it. We did a road like you describe 10 years ago and it still looks like the day we fixed it.

Brettny
Member
# Posted: 14 Sep 2021 06:14
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I wouldnt use any type of metal as it will find it's way into your tire, brake line or gas tank one way or the other. Many places that dont have alot of gas/oil Industry dont have easy acess to pipeline or mud mats

Optimistic I built our property driveway through a swamp in 2019 and havent touched it since. I dug ditches on each side to allow for drainage and put that dirt where I wanted the road. Then used 6-8in logs across the width of the road, in my case this was about 75ft total. At this point I left it for about a month to dry out. After it dried a bit I put rosd fabric and 3-6in of crushed gravel. I have had a dump truck on that spot with 8tons of stone and the road didnt budge.

optimistic
Member
# Posted: 14 Sep 2021 09:33
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I agree with you all about gravel and febric being best but cost of that for me is in the thousands...

My access path is 1500 ft. Most is fine with only a short amount really bad.

So making these seems like an easy, cheap, long term solution if using pt wood.

I am thinking of just using 4x6 pt wood so I don't have much construction work to do. I will lay it on the mud, add support under where it spans more than 4ft and drill some holes in it and drive 12" galvanized spike. 4 pieces of 4x6 8ft will be about $80 for me (coupon time!). plus a few spikes which are $1 each... So I can start with one section like that and see how it goes.

Only thing I am concerned with is traction. So if chicken wire is bad idea then how about fence wire? the heavier one? if still no then what else?

something like this -https://www.lowes.com/pd/Garden-Zone-Actual-50-ft-x-3-ft-Gray-Welded-Wire-Rolled-Gar den-Fencing/1000572441

They also have it in heavier gauge. I will just staple/nail it on top of the 4x6 for traction. Bad idea?

gcrank1
Member
# Posted: 14 Sep 2021 09:56
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A mud hole is a mud hole for a reason, not addressing the cause is like doing an inadequate foundation for a cabin.

Brettny
Member
# Posted: 14 Sep 2021 12:47
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Adding any type of metal for traction is a really really bad idea.

I would rather see you chainsaw cut some 1/4in groves in the wood before you add metal. But either way PT lumber you buy from a big box store isnt a long term fix because it will rot out in a few years. I have stair stringers that arnt in the mud that are 10yrs old and on there way out.

optimistic
Member
# Posted: 15 Sep 2021 10:10
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If I get 10 years out of it I will be super happy.....

I can prop it on cinder blocks or foundation grade pt wood so it doesn't sit in the mud fully. I think the idea of doing a small section - 12ft and see how it works is good before committing to more.

Anyway my season is a few months from ending

FishHog
Member
# Posted: 15 Sep 2021 10:38
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Seems like you know what you want to do and have your mind made up.
I’m not sure it’s the right plan but let us know how it works and make a plan for when someone drops a tire off the side of your bridge as it’s bound to happen sooner or latet

optimistic
Member
# Posted: 15 Sep 2021 16:43
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I think it is worth a shot.... For $100. To do one section. Only thing I still haven't figured out is the traction... I won't put metal following brettny advise.

Then what can I put that is easy?

BRADISH
Member
# Posted: 15 Sep 2021 17:10
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I would look into railroad ties personally. We really have very little rail infrastructure locally, but about 3 hours away there is a yard that will do railroad tie sales twice a year - at $5 each and you can take up to 50 of them. Hard to beat the price for the amount of material you get. The treating they give those timbers will outlast pretty much any PT timber you'll find off the shelf. So you may look to see if any opportunities like that around your area.

gcrank1
Member
# Posted: 15 Sep 2021 17:47
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And they are HEAVY

travellerw
Member
# Posted: 15 Sep 2021 17:57
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Quoting: optimistic
Then what can I put that is easy?


Geo Grid.. It looks just like expanded metal, but Its plastic so will just break if it gets bound up on an axle or tire. Should provide enough traction.

NorthRick
Member
# Posted: 15 Sep 2021 19:42
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Quoting: optimistic
Thinking about 3 pieces of 2x4 pressure treated. Running them like a joist. Then putting a pieces perpendicular on the bottom to set the distance between them to be 20" (each bridge). Then using 2x6 pt pieces to posts maybe every 3ft? 4ft?



I just don't think that will hold up to having an SUV driving over it.

Maybe get used railroad ties like Bradish suggested and make something that looks more like a railroad. Space the ties out and instead of steel rails lay wood planks.

Houska
Member
# Posted: 16 Sep 2021 06:44
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We've only had our property for 3 years, but we're going to redo all the bits where the Previous Guy improvised mud crossings with this'n'that.

In some cases, the material itself is decomposing. In others, the material is fine, but it's been sinking in the mud, sometimes unevenly, sometimes with more mud/slippery organic material accumulating on top.

So - tempting as it might be to save a few $, I'd only do that for something you want to last 3+- years. If you're aiming for 10 years, spend the time and $ to separate the mud from the surface layer, like the geotextile recommended here, or enough fill to at least yet your new surface well above the muck.

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