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Small Cabin Forum / Cabin Construction / Durastall Mustee 32 x 32 shower stall
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buckybuck
Member
# Posted: 8 Feb 2016 09:38
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I'm curious about real-world experience with this shower stall:

URL

I did a search and saw that over the years a couple of members here had installed one of these shower stalls. A couple of questions:

1. Specs say it's 75 inches tall, but it's not clear if that's for the shower walls or also includes the base height. How tall is this unit when it's installed? If push comes to shove, can the side panels be shortened an inch or two?

2. How do you like it?

3. How did you handle the plumbing below the drain?

Just
Member
# Posted: 8 Feb 2016 11:32
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I have installed two . The first was in a cabin I no longer own so I cannot give you the total height . It was installed on a plywood floor and I believe the pluming was a standard 2 in. tread protruding from the plastic 1 peace base . the only complaint I had was of the taps that came with the kit , they did not stand up well to hard water and needed replacement within 2 years .
The second was in a mud room for a friend it was on a cement floor they left a slot in the cement for the pluming . At my suggestion we did not use the taps that came in the kit but replaced it with a single leaver shower fixture .
This was not a good thing either . Because of the small size [32 x 32] of the stall bathers would tend to hit the leaver with their elbows while showering causing great discomfort
All in all the stall itself is " good " and a good value ," I would install another !! " I would use a 2 handle faucet and by a better quality curtain than the one that comes with the kit..

bldginsp
Member
# Posted: 8 Feb 2016 13:25
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Regardless of the type of shower pan you use, plumbing below the shower should be the same. Use a 2 inch drain because shower drains get a lot of soap scum and a 1-1/2" drain will clog up. Instal a standard 2" trap, and locate a vent downstream of the trap within 3 feet or so of the trap. The vent can be 1-1/2", and should come into the drain from above, or above and to the side, so water doesn't backwash into the vent and clog it with scum.

bobrok
Member
# Posted: 8 Feb 2016 13:44
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I have one identical to this except that my sidewalls came as one unit. Not sure of the name brand; could be the same.

I unfolded the unit out of the box, squared it up and mounted it onto the base. Top frame was just like the video. I installed it over half a dozen years ago at my camp when I built the bathroom. Prior to that it sat on a pallet as an outside shower. Still in like new shape, although we have very soft water so I've not had a problem with the included fixtures. They are rather flimsy however but ours doesn't see any abuse so I chose to keep and use them. I did mount an additional brace for the shower head just to be sure. I'd imagine if one grabbed on to one of the side bars with any force it wouldn't last.

My big beef was that even though the bottom nests into the channel on the base the top of the unit sways. Since I was just building the bathroom I built additional wood framing for the top and braced to two side walls. This solved the sway and the entire unit is now as stable as a plastic shower can be. I used standard PVC threaded and compression fittings for the floor drain.

Additionally, I put batt insulation between the shower and the inside walls. This really deadens the sound of splashing water for others who are in the small camp. More a courtesy than a necessity but it also helps support the walls against bumping.

Bought it on a whim for $100 at a home store. Couldn't pass up the price. Good move, I feel.

beachman
Member
# Posted: 8 Feb 2016 17:43
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This nearly the exact unit that we installed. A cheap shower curtain and the taps are not the greatest but OK. Like Bldginsp says, use the 2" drain. Ours is built in to a surrounding wall for strength - it would be flimsy as a stand alone. Our side walls were all one piece and had to be bent out to assemble. Seems to be fine for now. Ours is 33 x 33, maybe an older model, but we did not want to use a lot of space. I think you can shorten it if necessary. I am tall so I needed all of the height. Plumbed it through a wall on the side of the unit with pex tubing. Seems to be pretty tight.

bldginsp
Member
# Posted: 8 Feb 2016 20:46
Reply 


Another way to make a shower stall pretty quickly is using FRP, fiberglass reinforced panel, just 4x8 sheets of white textured fiberglass. You've seen it in commercial bathrooms. Glues right to the wall, special plastic corner and edge pieces. Works, ain't beautiful but I look worse, but the cost is not cheap and $100 for a usable shower stall isn't bad.

Julie2Oregon
Member
# Posted: 9 Feb 2016 01:04
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Glad you guys are posting about this because this is exactly the one I have on my supplies list. Not as a stand-alone but attached to the walls as a corner shower. Because I'm not plumbing in the shower fixtures themselves -- just the drain -- the taps are no consequence. I'll be using the Zodi outback and simply need the "stall" aspect and drain, etc.

This kit seems to be priced right for my purposes.

beachman
Member
# Posted: 9 Feb 2016 05:37
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Good to hear Julie. We have used this with the Zodi and it works great for that. The taps that come with it are very sensitive to cold and will break if any water is left in them to freeze. Maybe I will finish the water hook up this summer and report my results then for full use. The rails that attach to the sides are just plastic and might hold a towel. If you slip and grab one, you'll be on the floor holding a piece of broken plastic.

Julie2Oregon
Member
# Posted: 9 Feb 2016 18:24
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beachman
I'm glad to know it will suit my purpose! The size is perfect, what I'd wanted, and it's great to find an all-inclusive kit like this with the drain pan and everything. The rails are a bonus, as far as I'm concerned. I see them as a place to air dry undies and such, lol. Not as a safety feature or grab bars.

rockies
Member
# Posted: 9 Feb 2016 19:22
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Hmmm. Says it's 75 inches tall. I'm 75 inches tall, so the shower head would be mounted below my height. I hate having to crouch under the shower head. Do you have the height to install a taller unit?

beachman
Member
# Posted: 9 Feb 2016 20:49
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rockies, I am 78 inches tall and installed the shower above the unit. It should be OK.

bobrok
Member
# Posted: 9 Feb 2016 21:33
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There is no knockout in the wall to install the shower head. You can install it where you want, i.e.: above the enclosure.

darz5150
Member
# Posted: 9 Feb 2016 23:13 - Edited by: darz5150
Reply 


We have the same unit and it has worked out well for us. I added a grab bar on the ceiling, but you could also put it on the side walls.
To help with keeping the stall easy to clean, we got a squeegee that we use after taking a shower. It only takes a few seconds to squeegee down the walls to remove the soap scum etc.
We replaced the curtain rings with plastic ones. They slide a lot easier. And also you can get regular size shower curtain and cut them in half width wise.
So you can get 2 shower curtains out of a 6 foot wide curtain.
grab bar
grab bar
squeegee
squeegee


buckybuck
Member
# Posted: 5 Apr 2016 08:03 - Edited by: buckybuck
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I got the shower put together and can confirm that it's 75 inches tall including the base. (Wheew!). I'm going to attempt to plumb it during my next visit to my cabin. Since it's a 50-mile round trip to the closest big box, a couple of questions I could use answers to from those of you who've installed one of these.

The manual says to cut a 5 inch square hole in the floor for the drain. Why? Is there some reason I can't just jigsaw a round hole just a little bigger than the drain instead? (Just trying to make it tougher for mice.)

I had planned to put the faucet and shower head on the back wall opposite the stall opening and putting the shower in a enclosure, but I'm now wondering if that would invite too much water splash outside the stall. Is that a real threat? Where did you install the faucet and shower head--on a side wall or the back wall?

Just
Member
# Posted: 5 Apr 2016 08:51
Reply 


We went for the side wall and aimed the head at the back wall .
I think if you install the drain in the base before lying it in place
it dose not need that big of a hole , it only needs to be that large if you need to get a wrench on it after installation .

DaveBell
Member
# Posted: 5 Apr 2016 11:59
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I looked at this once. Did not like the reviews.

bobrok
Member
# Posted: 5 Apr 2016 14:22 - Edited by: bobrok
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Quoting: buckybuck
The manual says to cut a 5 inch square hole in the floor for the drain. Why? Is there some reason I can't just jigsaw a round hole just a little bigger than the drain instead? (Just trying to make it tougher for mice.)


I did a round hole, no problem with install.

Quoting: buckybuck
I had planned to put the faucet and shower head on the back wall opposite the stall opening and putting the shower in a enclosure, but I'm now wondering if that would invite too much water splash outside the stall. Is that a real threat? Where did you install the faucet and shower head--on a side wall or the back wall?


The design of this must have changed since I bought mine several years ago in order to give you more installation options. Mine had pre drilled holes in the left wall facing for the faucet knobs and no accommodation for installing the shower head.

So if I can answer your questions: I use a 2.9 GPM demand pump with no pressure tank, so there is certainly not excessive water pressure nor splash inside my enclosure. I installed a cutoff just behind the shower head to save water and do the wet down/soap up/rinse off routine without the water running all the time.

I'm a 6 footer myself, so I mounted the shower head on the top rail of the unit above the faucets and supported it with a wood block and pipe clamp assembly. This way I got the water as high as I needed it and didn't have to put yet another hole in the enclosure.

buckybuck
Member
# Posted: 5 Apr 2016 15:49
Reply 


Tell me more, Bobrok! I'll definitely be doing what you did with the shower head, and I gotta admit I was still hoping to have an epiphany about how to handle the water.

You're using only one on-demand pump and no pressure tank? Can you tell me how you've got this set up? Do you have a hot water source and, if so, how do you mix hot and cold water? (Myself, I think cold showers tend to encourage water conservation, but my wife is rather adamant that there needs to be a way to adjust shower water temperature). Outside a pressured system, I haven't been able to figure out how to do this without having separate, dedicated water pumps for both the cold and hot water lines.

razmichael
Member
# Posted: 5 Apr 2016 16:34
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Buckybuck - I think bobrok and I have a similar setup as this was discussed a while back in another thread - my portion of that discussion Water setup . In short - only need one pump - this will provide both hot and cold at the same time. Obviously limitations due to the size of the pump but just think of the pump as the pressure tank without the tank. Shurflo and others do also sell very small accumulator tanks which will smooth out the water flow a bit but we have not really had an issue. I feed a shower and a sink (with a second sink coming this summer) with hot and cold.

bobrok
Member
# Posted: 5 Apr 2016 17:05
Reply 


My camp is plumbed not unlike your house is. The exceptions are that I have a pump-and-store water system consisting of four 55 gallon blue barrels, and secondly, I have to apply a power source to push water through the pipes rather than relying on delivered pressure.

I'm not sure how detailed a system description you need, so let me begin simply and you can post any specific questions.

I pump water from a lake, double filter it and chlorinate it as its going into the barrels. The barrels are all interconnected through a system of hoses and "Y" adapters towards the single input point on my demand pump. I use a deep cycle (maybe 625 or so CCA, don't remember) marine battery exclusively to power the pump. Lasts forever on a charge. This entire setup is inside my shed which sits about 25 feet or so from the camp.

I have a hose on the ground running to the camp. Last year I added a carbon-type filter to the line just before it enters and I noticed a big difference in odor control.

From the point of entry it's set up just like your house would be. I split the input line. One line runs to the hot water heater, which is a 6 gallon Suburban RV type, propane fired. The other continues as my cold water supply line.

Then it's simply inserting "T" connections where needed and running two lines, one hot and one cold, to each fixture. I have a kitchen sink, a bathroom sink and the shower. It's rare that more than one fixture is open at the same time, but even when it happens I don't have a problem with low pressure.

I used Pex inside and am very pleased with the ease of installation. I also ran all the lines inside the camp along the wall/ceiling rather than underneath. I'm in a northern climate and I figured if nothing else this would extend my season a bit during those early and late freezes that damage pipes.

I hope this info helps.

PS: I see razmichael posted above and I will second his comment about thinking of the pump as a pressure tank w/o the tank. It cycles on and off so frequently your wife can wash her hair with abandon and you won't (shouldn't) hear a whimper from her coming from the bathroom!!!

buckybuck
Member
# Posted: 5 Apr 2016 19:18
Reply 


I don't know how I missed that thread you guys pointed out. Thanks.

Here's where my concept differs—I'm trying to avoid incorporating a hot water heater in my water system. I mentioned why in a thread I hijacked three or four months ago, but I'll explain again. I've been a weekender for a couple of years now and I've learned my hot water (I refer to it as hot water, but really it's warm water, and below the on-demand water pump's high temperature specs) needs are minimal--a couple of gallons for a navy shower or to wash dishes, and that's it for the day. Depending on the time of day, I could see how a pot of water heated on a stove in the morning or a container left in the sun all day would satisfy my hot water needs. (I've also got a turkey fryer I can repurpose as an on-demand hot water heater for the rare times my wife comes with me and demands hot water).

Ideally, I'd like a system where an on-demand pump would pull cold water at any time, but would also allow me to pour a couple of gallons of warm water into some sort of container (maybe under the sink) to mix with the cold water as needed for those one or two times a day I want hot water. I don't want to have to pressurize that hot water container. The only way I see to do this is to have a separate on-demand pump for the hot water side, something like the diagram below. I just wonder if I'm missing something and there's some way to run both the cold and hot water through the same pump, rather than using two.
Water system
Water system


hueyjazz
Member
# Posted: 5 Apr 2016 19:30
Reply 


I installed this unit and it works well with modifications. I think it necessary to enclose it in support walls. Too flimsy otherwise.
Plumbing fixtures are cheap so I upgraded. Internals I plumbed with Pex. I use tandem 55 gallon food grade drums for water and bring a third drum from home to resupply. I have a L10 ecotemp demand water heater with shurflo pump and accumulator. It works flawless. I fix the output of flow/heat setting of the heater to be maximum temp of what I want and only plumb one line for shower. I use this valve
URL
It conserves water and is functional.
But to be honest, we much prefer the outdoor shower season permitting. Supplied by the same system.

AK Seabee
Member
# Posted: 5 Apr 2016 22:23
Reply 


Buckybuck, Our rv has a ball valve to switch intake lines. The ball valve is prior to the 12 volt pump. I can either draw from the main tank or turn the valve and the pump will pull from a secondary source. For me its a one gallon bolltle of rv antifreeze. For you a secondary container with hot water (?).

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