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Small Cabin Forum / Cabin Construction / Chinking?
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LastOutlaw
Member
# Posted: 18 Dec 2016 18:51
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My cabin was built differently than any other I have seen. The entire front room was built out of split cedar posts. First they framed it in split and full cedar posts then covered the framing with paneling and then a coating of tar paper. Then they covered the whole thing with vertical split cedar posts and then chinked with some type of cement like material. Some of this chinking is falling out and I would like to re-chink. Does anyone know what a good material to use that will last and adhere well for chinking between cedar logs?

Smawgunner
Member
# Posted: 19 Dec 2016 20:37
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You can use the stuff if you're just patching but it's pretty darn expensive.
https://www.permachink.com

Or you could rip it all out staplegun some mesh in there and use mortar about a quarter or half inch at most. That's what we did to our cabin between the logs.

Malamute
Member
# Posted: 22 Dec 2016 21:11 - Edited by: Malamute
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Theres a mixture that's much tougher than plain mortar. Its what was considered "high tech" before the modern latex type chinking thats currently used came about. The mixture is 1 part Portland cement, 2 parts gypsum plaster, and 3 parts coarse sawdust, such as chain saw sawdust. Add water until its like medium thick oatmeal. Its far tougher to remove than plain mortar, and holds in the joint far better. It needs nails along the joints to hold it to the logs, but stays well. Removing plain mortar chinking is very easy, it crumbles and breaks up easily with a hammer and chisel. The mixture requires a LOT of work to get out in comparison.

If you try it, I strongly suggest not making very much at once. When it starts to set, there isn't any stopping it. Its also very difficult to remove from containers if it sets up. To start, Id use a small coffee can for the measure. When doing it and at speed and with 2 people working, Id only use 2 cans Portland, 4 cans gypsum plaster, 6 cans sawdust. Once its mixed, you DONT take a break or go eat lunch. Wetting it or covering it wont help. A mortar board helps, and use a margin trowel to push it into the joints.

I learned about it from a guy that saved historic old cabins. He had dozens of old cabins, some that were 30-40 some years since being chinked and were still fine. He poked strips of fiberglass insulation into the joint between the logs before chinking.

LastOutlaw
Member
# Posted: 23 Dec 2016 22:28 - Edited by: LastOutlaw
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Thank you both. Malamute that sounds like a good mixture to try and might work in my situation.
Smaw.. the permachink would be much easier but i doubt i can afford it. I may get a tube or two to try and see how much area it covers.

Smawgunner
Member
# Posted: 25 Dec 2016 21:39 - Edited by: Smawgunner
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Yeah, Permachink is over the top. Probably a good product but... here is a pick of mine,..just out of the bag mortar.
IMG_0117.JPG
IMG_0117.JPG


LastOutlaw
Member
# Posted: 26 Dec 2016 16:48
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man that looks great but those are huge spaces to fill arent they?

Smawgunner
Member
# Posted: 26 Dec 2016 19:07
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They ARE! My cabin was moved in 1903 and when the put it back together they shimmed every log raising the ceiling a foot or more. But with the wire mesh, the chink/mortar is 1/2 inch thick at most.

LastOutlaw
Member
# Posted: 28 Dec 2016 16:31
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I was digging online and re-found this article on home made chinking. I forgot that I had found this a couple of years ago and bookmarked it. Maybe someone else would like to try this recipe... I'm going to for sure!

http://www.motherearthnews.com/diy/log-cabin-chinking-zmaz75ndzgoe?pageid=1#PageConte nt1

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