Small Cabin

Small Cabin Forum
 - Forums - Register/Sign Up - Reply - Search - Statistics -

Small Cabin Forum / Off-Grid Living / Cabin Coffee
. 1 . 2 . >>
Author Message
paulz
Member
# Posted: 10 Nov 2016 21:25
Reply 


I have an electric drip coffee maker but rather than firing up the generator I have been boiling water with propane and pouring it in. Doesn't work very well, after about 1/3 of a pot full no more water passes through the filter. Are there special filters for doing this?

LastOutlaw
Member
# Posted: 10 Nov 2016 21:34
Reply 


buy a french press. I love mine and use it at my cabin.

razmichael
Member
# Posted: 10 Nov 2016 23:15
Reply 


+1 for a french press - just make sure you get the correct grind (not too fine).

bldginsp
Member
# Posted: 10 Nov 2016 23:18
Reply 


I use a coffee funnel and paper filters. Works fine. I've always been intimidated by coffee presses because they seem complicated. They're also kind of fancy and foo foo like Starbucks double mocha frappe whip with sprinkles.

Yes, I'm trying to start a coffee debate.

Cowboy coffee- pick the cleanest looking beans can off the garbage heap, rinse it out a bit, throw in a half a cup of Folgers, fill it with water from the ditch next to camp, set on the fire til it boils for a minute. If you're a wimp put sugar in it. Remove the can from the fire with a channel locks, allow to cool a little and drink directly from the can.

MtnDon
Member
# Posted: 10 Nov 2016 23:54
Reply 


I've changed to a cold brew method. Basically you steep coarse ground beans for 20 - 24 hours, then filter it. You end up with a concentrate. I dilute 1 to 3, other tastes may vary. I have the OXO cold brewer and it works well. The coffee does need to be coarse ground or the micro S/S filter clogs. The coffee is not as acidic when done cold. I love the taste. Starbucks sells cold brew and some groceries carry some premade cold brews as concentrates. No electricity or heating source needed. Google "cold brew coffee" if you have not heard of it.

skootamattaschmidty
Member
# Posted: 11 Nov 2016 05:34
Reply 


We have an old percolator my mom gave me that she used when we were camping as children. We use that on our stove. It works and tastes great. Last year my wife bought me a French press after a camping trip with a buddy who had one. I love it and it makes some of the best coffee I have ever had. And it is very easy to use.

When we are lazy we do have a keurig machine that we fire up the generator for and quickly make a cup. Convenient yes....but the sound of the generator, even though it is a quiet Honda, takes away from the peacefulness of a beautiful morning.

Steve_S
Member
# Posted: 11 Nov 2016 05:46
Reply 


Mmmm Coffee the ever important fuel !

Paul, have a look at these here at Wally Mart
https://www.walmart.com/ip/Farberware-Yosemite-8-Cup-Percolator/10927183

I have a similar one and it works like a charm, mine uses a paper disc filter (that part kinda sucks) likely there is one or two that have a permanent filter.

Google "stove top percolator" and there are many to choose from.

razmichael
Member
# Posted: 11 Nov 2016 07:05
Reply 


Quoting: bldginsp
They're also kind of fancy and foo foo like Starbucks double mocha frappe whip with sprinkles.

Never thought about that - I'll try adding some foo foo to my French Press coffee next time!
I have "fond" memories of my Army days in the field coming up with some very interesting means of making coffee - often involving old socks and such. Not to mention just using the small instant coffee, sugar and some powder edible oil product packs, open them all up and pour them directly into your mouth. Real time saver!

bldginsp
Member
# Posted: 11 Nov 2016 08:22
Reply 


Quoting: razmichael
I have "fond" memories of my Army days in the field coming up with some very interesting means of making coffee - often involving old socks and such

were the socks clean?

razmichael
Member
# Posted: 11 Nov 2016 08:32
Reply 


Quoting: bldginsp
were the socks clean?

Clean socks are for your feet! Obviously!

morock
Member
# Posted: 11 Nov 2016 08:48
Reply 


I have three different sized stove top percolators (depending on the # of guests). Most can be used without a filter but I use a basket filter and push it through the protruding stem. The longer it perks the smoother it gets.

There is nothing like a cup of fresh perked coffee on the end of the dock, first thing in the morning. Geez, I miss summer.

SE Ohio
Member
# Posted: 11 Nov 2016 09:27
Reply 


Ditto on the perculator. Ours makes good coffee, just don't mind the grit/grounds that make it into the cup.

Never tried a French press. Like a waffle iron?

Wife (Brit) has converted me to tea (it has caffeine too) which only needs boiling water. We use tea bags.

Have seen coffee bags before but never tried.

SE Ohio

paulz
Member
# Posted: 11 Nov 2016 10:35
Reply 


OK, so it's French press vs. percolator. First step is to see if my dear old mother in law has an old percolator. Thanks!

Nate R
Member
# Posted: 11 Nov 2016 10:53 - Edited by: Nate R
Reply 


We use the pour-over method in our off-grid trailer. Heat water on our propane stove, (Coffee Gator on Amazon for the kettle with thermometer built in), and then a ceramic pour over thing with a filter.

Works well enough, when our drip maker at home died, we went with the same setup at home for daily use. I use a scale to figure out the ratio of coffee/water. Once you do it once though, as long as you don't change grinds/brands, you can use something else (Scoops, mark on the kettle for water amount, etc)

It makes HIGH quality coffee and no electric power needed. Easy cleanup. Very happy with this method so far!

shall
Member
# Posted: 11 Nov 2016 11:31
Reply 


I have a french press and a stove top percolator and I prefer the percolator. They both taste about the same to me, but the percolator is just much simpler in my opinion.

I've had this one for probably 5 years. $19 on Amazon.
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00005NCWQ/ref=oh_aui_search_detailpage?ie=UTF8&psc =1

I would also recommend the disc coffee filters. They're cheap and they keep the grit out.

I did have to buy a $5 glass percolator bulb to replace the plastic one after the first 2-3 years

morock
Member
# Posted: 11 Nov 2016 13:06
Reply 


Reminded me of the big east-coast blackout a number of years back. I made a large pot of coffee using the 16 cup percolator on the BBQ and knocked on my neighbours door offering a cup of hot coffee. The looks I got, mostly glee, but some of them could not figure out how I made coffee in a blackout.

danielgraff
Member
# Posted: 11 Nov 2016 22:00
Reply 


Can't believe I'm going to write this but...

The little packets of instant coffee have come a LONG way. Starbucks and others are great.

I Just bought some to go camping with my son and thought they were surprisingly good.

Little packets the size of a Splenda or Equal packet. Dissolve in hot water and your all set.

Malamute
Member
# Posted: 12 Nov 2016 11:31 - Edited by: Malamute
Reply 


Camp coffee works pretty well. You need to get past the general prejudice against the grounds, they can be mitigated pretty easily.

I make mine at higher elevation, so the water temp may be a little lower. Coffee nerds seem to feel the exact water temp has some bearing on coffee quality.

I get a pot or pan of water on the stove, get it lightly simmering. I use one extra cup of water over what I plan for coffee. dump in tablespoon of coffee for each cup, including the extra cup of water. I let it simmer a few minutes slowly, then take off heat and just let it set without disturbing it. Some people add a small splash of cold water to settle the grounds, but I rarely have and haven't had much to complain about. After it set a few minutes, carefully and slowly pour, not stirring up the grounds on the bottom. The coffee is usually strong and smooth. Plan to toss the last sip in the cup, it may (or may not) have a few grounds in it if you did it right. The last cup in the pot is about pure grounds sludge, its tossed also.

My ex was in deep coffee withdrawls in camp the first time we camped. She was horrified watching me make coffee, and didn't want any. She broke down after a few minutes and seeing I didn't die. She took a couple drinks and said it was the best coffee shed ever had.

Ive used the enamel camp coffee pots and regular stainless Revere Ware kitchen pans, both work, though the taller pot is easier to keep the grounds at the bottom when pouring.

The gold filter baskets may or may not help with your coffee maker and the clogging filters. I find them annoying to clean after use, but handy to have around if you run out of filters.

silverwaterlady
Member
# Posted: 12 Nov 2016 14:01 - Edited by: silverwaterlady
Reply 


I make my camp coffee in a 12 cup white enamelware percolator from the 1920's.

I use Starbucks French Roast I grind myself with a hand grinder set on course.
I use one cup of ground coffee. I wet the filter basket before I put the grounds in. Doing the above two things almost eliminates grounds in brewed percolator coffee.

Some people may disagree on my brewing method. I bring it to a perk than turn the flame down to the lowest simmer and perk for 15 minutes.
This is such a excellent cup of coffee. Smooth and strong.
Guests always comment on how delicious my coffee is and ask me how I brew it.

To keep it hot I've been using a Stanley thermos. I decided to try a stainless steel airpot instead. Because the coffee will stay hot longer,no opening the lid to pour coffee and losing steam.
I'll have to wait until spring to try that out.

Edited to add: I do not use a paper filter and don't know anyone that has in a stovetop percolator.

Nate R
Member
# Posted: 12 Nov 2016 21:25
Reply 


Quoting: danielgraff
Can't believe I'm going to write this but...

The little packets of instant coffee have come a LONG way. Starbucks and others are great.



You're right, at least for the Starbucks branded packets. I've been impressed with those for instant coffee.

rachelsdad
Member
# Posted: 13 Nov 2016 05:34 - Edited by: rachelsdad
Reply 


As an avid backpacker and friend of the owner of a multi location high end coffee shop I've tinkered with how to have great coffee the morning after a 6-10 mile day. When I was younger I humped both a French press and aluminum percolator to do a side by side with my companions. Not one of us could really tell the difference save for the grittier French press mouthfeel...mouthfeel...REALLY!!???

Anyhow...I say this to prove my creds as a relatively experienced coffee-nista.

My go to coffee the past 4 years?? Nescafe Classico instant. Absolutely blew me away. I looked at my shelf full of coffee gadgets just last night. My wife and I use it at home...It is that good!

As for the OP...are you pouring the water into the reservoir or over the filter?

LoonWhisperer
Member
# Posted: 13 Nov 2016 12:56
Reply 


Quoting: Nate R
You're right, at least for the Starbucks branded packets. I've been impressed with those for instant coffee.


We use these now as well. Not bad for instant but not cheap either.

With limited water we found the french press was a bit of a pain to clean. Does make great coffee though.

FishHog
Member
# Posted: 13 Nov 2016 16:56
Reply 


I bring in my drinking water, so found a french press and percolator took too much to clean.

URL

this with just disposable filters was my best purchase for the cottage. Keeps coffee hot for hours. I love it, simple. Use it all week and just a quick rinse at the end and I'm good to go. Uses next to no water for cleaning.

groingo
Member
# Posted: 13 Nov 2016 23:09
Reply 


Never been much on Coffee drinkin'......just a pinch of Folgers freeze dried coffee in my mouth and I' m good for the day!

DaveBell
Member
# Posted: 14 Nov 2016 00:12
Reply 


I firmly believe that coffee is it's own food group out in the woods. I use the Folgers teabag style coffee.

RiverCabin
Member
# Posted: 14 Nov 2016 16:46
Reply 


Quoting: danielgraff
Can't believe I'm going to write this but...

The little packets of instant coffee have come a LONG way. Starbucks and others are great.


This is the answer. The starbucks packs are expensive but good. I've found Folgers packs to be not so good but the Maxwell house and Nescafe packs are good as well.

tichalet
Member
# Posted: 14 Nov 2016 17:55
Reply 


LOLOL groingo!!!!

I use one of those moka pots for stovetop 'espresso' every morning or whenever I want a cuppa. Bialetti makes the iconic pot, but I currently use an Ilsa & also have other brands for when I need to make more than one mug.

It's not really a true espresso (no crema & not as strong), but it's easy to brew, very smooth, never bitter & just right as Goldilocks used to say.

(Gonna try that trick of stuffing Folgers crystals in my gum next time I'm in a hurry, though! )

countrygirl
Member
# Posted: 15 Nov 2016 11:25
Reply 


i make an Americano mmm.
I have stove top espresso, make 8 cup of espresso. boil water.
Pour the espresso into a coffee mug
Pour in between 1 and 8 oz. (30 to 235 ml) of hot water from your kettle. This will depend largely upon the strength you desire.
exspress.jpg
exspress.jpg


old greybeard
Member
# Posted: 15 Nov 2016 13:06
Reply 


French Press is the way to go. Nothing is simpler or easier to clean. And we hand grind our beans right before use. You do need a coarse grind. We have one that makes 3 cups, and 1 that makes just one.
Percolators dump boiling water on the beans, repeatedly, they have a burnt after taste. If you like that go at it, I'm not burning my beautiful Vietnamese french roast beans.

paulz
Member
# Posted: 16 Nov 2016 09:12
Reply 


Ha, woke up in the cabin this morning, turned on my tablet and watched an hour long episode 'Coffee' on Modern Marvels. They had nothing good to say about percolating, praised the French press and mentioned an old method called vacuum brewing that is making a comeback. From 2005 though.

. 1 . 2 . >>
Your reply
Bold Style  Italic Style  Underlined Style  Thumbnail Image Link  Large Image Link  URL Link           :) ;) :-( :confused: More smilies...

» Username  » Password 
Only registered users can post here. Please enter your login/password details before posting a message, or register here first.