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Small Cabin Forum / Off Topic / Copper Chef Frying Pan
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paulz
Member
# Posted: 5 Feb 2021 09:42
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So my wife got suckered into buying one of these frying pans, the ones that require an Aussie accent to sell on TV. I seasoned it, coated it with veggie oil and heated it until it smoked.

Last night's dinner is still stuck to it. Does these really work?

WILL1E
Member
# Posted: 5 Feb 2021 09:50
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Sounds like you answered your own question!

darz5150
Member
# Posted: 5 Feb 2021 09:58 - Edited by: darz5150
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I think your just supposed to burn cheese and hard candy in it, like the commercials.🙄😫
Try boiling water in it. If that sticks, you know it's junk. Lol

paulz
Member
# Posted: 5 Feb 2021 09:58
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Not really, I could break an anvil. Thanks for the vote of confidence though.

gcrank1
Member
# Posted: 5 Feb 2021 10:11
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I never read how to pre-treat that product, thought you just wash clean from the store and cook?
Fwiw, we bought a different frypan about a year ago (granitestone?) that was supposed to be magic new-gen no-stick also, no oil to be used. I carefully followed the pre-use instructions to the letter. Yeah, the commercials show the burned on food just sliding around.....come to think of it I havent seen those commercials for a while.
Anyway, in frustration I started using a small bit of oil and things were better, and after a couple weeks it settled down and works great now, most of the time without oil.
Iirc something was in the instructions about 'avoid high heat', well, I use the old cast iron for that! The one I found neglected at the 'new' cabin last year and had to clean/refurb/reseason/start over almost from scratch.
That reseason/start over took a couple of months using it quite regularly, now it is pretty much no-stick like the new one is supposed to be, go figure. But the new one is far lighter so better for my wife. I like it now too.
Either one has some little sticking issues with eggs and potatoes though they both clean up easy now. I think eggs and potatoes are funny that way. We do use soapy dishwater with the new one, never on the ci.

Aklogcabin
Member
# Posted: 5 Feb 2021 12:38
Reply 


We bought one a couple years ago. I like it. It's deep too. Always cleans right up.
So I gotta ask. Why did you treat it like a cast iron pan ?

paulz
Member
# Posted: 5 Feb 2021 13:55
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Per the instructions

https://www.kitchengearpros.com/how-to-season-copper-chef-pan/

gcrank1
Member
# Posted: 5 Feb 2021 15:50
Reply 


Reading that it sounds like one of those generic posts by somebody with a gift of gab and little to no experience. A lot of it is like a re-write of how to season cast iron.
Did ref to those instructions come with the pan?
Try boiling some water for a while, the stuck stuff should release, then clean gently if possible. Just like with painting or gluing, a roughed up surface will only help stuff stick later.
Then start using it at less than high heat and never without food in it, a bare overheated pan like that is asking for trouble.

paulz
Member
# Posted: 5 Feb 2021 16:50
Reply 


Same instructions on every copper pan website.

I have most of the crud off. I did read never to use oven cleaner on copper, thankfully in time..

ICC
Member
# Posted: 5 Feb 2021 20:14
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The only copper in those Copper Chef pans is in the name and the color of the ceramic coating. No real metallic copper present. The pans are aluminum with a copper-colored ceramic coating and a steel layer in the bottom to permit use on an induction cooktop.

In my experience, ceramic pans and pots are very convenient but do not like high heat levels. High heat and scratches lead to food sticking.

A true copper pan has a copper body and will cost more for a single piece than what many folks pay for an entire set of pots and pans. A real copper pan is an absolute joy to cook with.

Just like a gas range is better than an electric one because the heat adjustment is quicker than electric, copper heats and cools more rapidly as the range setting is changed. When a pot/pan is removed from heat, or the heat turned down the contents stop cooking right then as the pot/pan rapidly loses heat.

FWIW, the best copper cookware is copper with a tin lining. Because of the expense and weight the copper is usually only 2mm to 3mm thick. Copper itself is reactive to acidic foods in particular. Copper can be dissolved into the food and too much copper is unhealthy. Tin is completely non-reactive to food. Tin is also naturally nonstick. Super! Most copper cookware sold today uses a stainless steel lining. The S/S is also non-reactive to foods which is good, but food sticks to S/S, which is bad. S/S is very durable though while the tin linings are readily scratched and will erode over time with use. The low resistance to scratching is why wooden spoons, etc. are traditionally used. Tin lining can also be damaged by high heat. It can actually be melted on high heat so copper/tin pans are not good for high heat searing of steaks, etc. Use cast iron for that.

Tin lined copperware can be re-tinned. There are places that specialize in that. Be prepared to pay more for re-tinning one pan than for a few ceramic coated pans.

I inherited my love of cooking their tin-lined copper cookware.

paulz
Member
# Posted: 6 Feb 2021 08:57
Reply 


Damn Aussies!

I got it cleaned up and cooked at a lower temperature last night, much better. I've been using olive oil, probably doesn't help.

Aklogcabin
Member
# Posted: 6 Feb 2021 10:20
Reply 


No wonder ours worked great. I never read the instructions

gcrank1
Member
# Posted: 6 Feb 2021 10:44
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Ime, if using oil make it a very small amount for best results.

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