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Small Cabin Forum / Cabin Construction / What are some pro's and con's with a side exit chimney?
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rockeater
Member
# Posted: 8 Dec 2013 21:05
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A side exit chimney? What I mean is run the chimney out the wall behind the stove and up the outside wall vs straight up and out the roof.
Thanks

groingo
Member
# Posted: 8 Dec 2013 21:25
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Support is one problem, through wall insulated isolator can be a pain, having to replace the outside wall bend every couple of years because they rot out easier, less than great draft due to two 45 degree bends (stove top transition and outside wall transition) and finally getting it far enough above your roofline so it won't back draft from your roof or nearby trees, straight up through the roof is better and easier all round.

bldginsp
Member
# Posted: 8 Dec 2013 22:02
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The more stove pipe you have in the room with the stove, the more heat is transferred into the room. Some people complain that their woodstove heats their small cabin too much, in which case maybe thru the wall would help?

neb
Member
# Posted: 8 Dec 2013 22:16
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I'm in the same mode wondering what I should also. For me going through the wall would be easy but not sure if it would be the best. I would angle mine from the stove to the top of the wall then out and up. I would go straight out then up. Not sure if that would make some differance.

toyota_mdt_tech
Member
# Posted: 8 Dec 2013 22:41 - Edited by: toyota_mdt_tech
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I think a pipe through a wall looks ugly. But in some cases, its the only option. If you can do it, through the roof. Ideally, if you have lots of snow, try to keep is close to the ridge. If not able to, then make sure its well supported or the sliding snow can shear it off.

The code may vary, but in my area, the pipe must extend 2 feet over the highest point on the roof (ridge) "or" be 10 feet away. (the top of the pipe, measures straight across horizontally to the roof, must be 10 feet or more) If you have a steep roof, the 10 feet away is hard to do. So you may end up with a tall chimney.

SubArcticGuy
Member
# Posted: 8 Dec 2013 23:20
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Having just put out a fully engulfed attic space on Thursday night from a through the roof install...I am very glad to have my chimney through the wall. I only have one small enclosed space where it passes through the wall and I left the trim ring unscrewed so I can move it and inspect it whenever I like. I also love not having to go on the roof to clean the chimney.

I do have to pull the elbow off the top of the stove to clean that but you should be doing that on a vertical install to or else all the ash ends up inside the stove (which usually has a baffle plate that makes it hard to clean out).

If I do have a chimney fire I just have to move the trim ring and have a quick look and then go outside to have a look. I don't have to worry about the unseen buried places.

MtnDon
Member
# Posted: 8 Dec 2013 23:55
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The main 2 reasons I do not like through the wall are a poorer draft can result and maybe more insulated pipe is required; more expense. I would not do a through the wall unless there was absolutely no way to do a straight up run through the roof. Just an opinion.


My trick for an easy chimney clean is to start off by using a telescoping length of pipe from the stove up. When I clean of course the stove is stone cold. I remove the telescoping pipe. The upper end has a bayonet fitting, the lower end I lift/shorten enough to swing away from the stove. This year we now have have a heavy cloth bag with the neck sewn around an pipe adapter. I fit that into the chimney that goes up through ceiling and roof.

Climb to roof where there are ladder rungs from the eve to the chimney. Twist off the cap and plunge the brush down. All the crud ends up in the bag. Use a shop vac to clean out anything that is inside the stove neck. Take the bad down and carry outside. The section of telescoping pipe gets cleaned outside, one in a bucker to collect the crud.

Reassemble. No crud in the stove or cabin. Works for me.

bldginsp
Member
# Posted: 9 Dec 2013 11:02
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The roof requirement, which I think is the same everywhere, is 2 feet above anything within 10 feet horizontally as Toyota said, but also it must be at least 3 feet above the roof where it penetrates the roof plane. These apply whether its thru the wall or roof. If you go thru the wall, the chimney will be at the eave, so you'll have to install a high chimney to get 2 feet above any roof within 10 feet. Thru the roof, you can instal closer to the ridge. In this case you probably use less chimney pipe and more stove pipe, but chimney is more expensive than stovepipe.

OwenChristensen
Member
# Posted: 10 Dec 2013 08:00
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Outside chimneys suck for a wood stove. They are hard to get your draft going because they are too cold. They have bad creosote build up for the same reason. Think about how little air actually goes through it. No more than your intake/ draft.

TheWildMan
Member
# Posted: 10 Dec 2013 08:31
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I have always used through the wall chimneys, i'v had 2 cabins and a house with them.

pro: easier to install for an average person, your not messing with roofing and potential leaks. they are also very easy to clean. the bottom of the chimney outside has an easy to remove plug that can be removed and then you just run the brush up and pull it back out, cleans out all the built up creosote. its done from the ground level so there are no ladders and you can clean it weekly or any time you want. if you use a T connector inside instead of an elbow you can use a removable cover and use a brush to clan out the horizontal part. quick and easy to install and quick and easy to clean.

Con: you need a lot more insulated chimney, enough to run up along the roof and enough to get high enough to get a good draft, while its easier to install and doesn't involve roof work its also a lot more money to buy the parts. you also have a lot less stove pipe on the inside so less heat is transferred to the interior of the cabin. you will also have a weaker draft because of the angles.

if your not skilled with roofing, have money to spend on more chimney parts and are willing to do the cleaning yourself then its a good option.

if you can do roofing or know someone who can, and are willing to go onto the roof or hire someone to clean the chimney then a roof install is better.

toyota_mdt_tech
Member
# Posted: 10 Dec 2013 09:59
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Quoting: SubArcticGuy
Having just put out a fully engulfed attic space on Thursday night from a through the roof install...I am very glad to have my chimney through the wall



I dont see how it was possible unless the support box in the ceiling was full of debris from squirrels in the attic etc. (I do check mine whenever I return, will put a steel mesh over it next time) or you didnt use the fuly insulated stainless double wall spendy pipe, required from the ceiling and upward to the cap.

SubArcticGuy
Member
# Posted: 10 Dec 2013 10:41
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I can't speak to the quality of the install because I didn't see it before the fire (the support box was nearly completely burnt/ripped down by the time we were done). But, this isn't the first fire of this type I have been on.

I am sure lots of the through the roof installs are perfectly safe (provided you can keep the rodents out....I do have issues with this with my sauna). I do have through the roof installs in my garage and sauna, but I will admit I sleep much better at night knowing my chimney is outside the house.

foxdud
Member
# Posted: 10 Dec 2013 19:03
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All. Pros no cons!

foxdud
Member
# Posted: 10 Dec 2013 19:04
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All pro's no cons!
image.jpg
image.jpg


neb
Member
# Posted: 10 Dec 2013 19:38
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foxdud
I like it! When you went through the wall what did you use? It looks like you may have cut out the siding and from there I can't tell. I got a stove now and want to install it but really having a hard time to decide through the roof or not. I have plywood and tin only on roof and side walls.
Tell me what I need to do? LOL I have been around stoves most of my life but have never installed one. I want to do it right don't want to burn the shack down. LOL

foxdud
Member
# Posted: 11 Dec 2013 12:43
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I just went between the studs cut the hole and used 2 2x4"s nailed together and started laying brick around the stove pipe. no problem at all.
01b1f5c07a570e4798be.jpg
01b1f5c07a570e4798be.jpg


foxdud
Member
# Posted: 11 Dec 2013 12:54
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use 2 0r 3 pieces of 2x4 nailed together for your shelf to lay the brick on to support the weight of the brick. then on the outside I drilled 2 holes in each metal supports you see and lag bolted it into the studs. so 4 big lag bolts on the outside to hold the chimney in place along with laying the brick around the stove pipe going through the wall will support everything. the only thing I would suggest you do different is use fire brick instead of the regular old red brick I used... Also I used cement board on my floor and wall behind the stove to prevent the wall from over heating. I also plan on stoning over the cement board. you would be surprised how much heat the stones will hold after the fire is out. my stove will run you out of our cabin, It gets so hot in there we almost always have to open the windows and doors. I was just up there last week as it is deer season here and I was sitting in the cabin with shorts on and drinking a cold beer while it was 21 degrees outside and had the front and back doors both open along with all 3 windows.

neb
Member
# Posted: 11 Dec 2013 19:14
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HA ha ha did your beer get warm? I have been around stoves for many years but never had to install one so this is new for me. Looks good and great idea. Thanks

foxdud
Member
# Posted: 11 Dec 2013 19:18
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Beer was cold

Dillio187
Member
# Posted: 12 Dec 2013 12:01
Reply 


my Dad installed an outside chimney on his house before last winter. It doesn't draft well and is really messy. unfortunately his stove is in the basement and I think that makes matters even worse. He said with the extreme cold we've been getting, he hasn't even been able to start a fire because the chimney back drafts so bad the smoke goes out the stove door instead of out the chimney.

I'm glad I did through the roof on my cabin.

SubArcticGuy
Member
# Posted: 12 Dec 2013 13:08
Reply 


Dillio187: Does your Dad have a fresh air intake installed on the stove? I had a lot of issues with downdrafts and smoke until I installed a fresh air intake right to the back of the stove. Now I can light a fire in a cold chimney at -40. It made a huge difference.

My setup is a stove in the basement with an exterior chimney.

Dillio187
Member
# Posted: 12 Dec 2013 13:55
Reply 


not that I know of. It's an old stove that pipes into the cold air return on the house. I've mentioned putting a hair dryer or torch into the flue to reverse the flow, he said the other night he couldn't even get it to reverse with TWO hair dryers running.

I did mention opening a window down there to try to equalize the flow.

SubArcticGuy
Member
# Posted: 12 Dec 2013 15:14
Reply 


Before I had the fresh air intake I would have to fully open a basement window AND the front door and basement door. Then I might have a chance....Since I put the intake on it has been no problem...plus I have less ice around my front door frame since my house isn't try to maintain a negative pressure when the stove is gone (the make up air has to come from somewhere).

foxdud
Member
# Posted: 12 Dec 2013 15:24
Reply 


My stove drafts like no tomorrow! one thing to think about is you must have your chimney above the peak of your roof. all of the problems I've read above sounds to me like they don't have their chimney tall enough.

mattd
Member
# Posted: 13 Dec 2013 15:51
Reply 


Quoting: foxdud
I just went between the studs cut the hole and used 2 2x4"s nailed together and started laying brick around the stove pipe. no problem at all.


so how do you seal around the exterior brick to siding joint?

foxdud
Member
# Posted: 13 Dec 2013 19:23
Reply 


caulking is your friend.

neb
Member
# Posted: 14 Dec 2013 10:46
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SubArcticGuy
Yes I have to agree with the intake on the back of stove also. I have talked to people and they say the same thing. You need that air flow from the back up the pipe when first starting fire then you can close if you want. It makes a big differance according to people that have one.
Do you have a picture of your stove set up? I would love to see it if you would share some pictures!

toofewweekends
Member
# Posted: 14 Dec 2013 20:44
Reply 


thru the wall also eliminates any issues with sliding snow off a big roof whacking your chimney. We can stack up 3+ feet of snow on the roof before it slides (off a 12-12 metal pitch). That's a lot of mass in motion. Having the chimney come out the wall and sitting several inches away from the snow load is a lot of peace of mind. And draft has never been an issue.

neb
Member
# Posted: 14 Dec 2013 22:15
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SubArcticGuy
Thanks for you input and I will go through the wall.

toofewweekends
Thanks for your knowledge and I also have talked to geys that have had them out the wall and have had no problems. I will give it a try.

SubArcticGuy
Member
# Posted: 15 Dec 2013 02:28 - Edited by: SubArcticGuy
Reply 


Hey Neb, Here is a couple of pictures of the interior...The outside is pretty self explanatory (and it is 12:20am and it is snowing and blowing outside so I am not getting a photo) .

I put some foil bubble wrap on the first section of pipe because I Would get some condensation on it otherwise. The stove has an adapter that goes right onto the back of the stove so I don't get strong downdrafts filling the room.

I would love to find a way to hide that pipe in the wall but I haven't gotten to it yet. I don't want to loose that much insulation out of the wall but I have thought about doing a built out mantel/stonework or tile of some kind to but some boxed tin ducting back there.

The second photo is just of the trim plate removed from the wall. The thimble is cold to the touch on the bottom and slightly cooler than room temperature on the top right now.

The chimney outside just has a 90 with a cleanout and goes up well past the roofline. I only have 10" eaves (plus a gutter) so I put it out past that. The cleanout is maybe 18" off the ground but I can get a fibreglass rod cleaning brush up there quite easily. Once a year I will also use a screwdriver or something to clear the crud around the chimney cap as well (in the snow free season).

I have to rebuild the roof this year so I was thinking about extending the eves...if I do I will just trim around the chimney and keep the 10" eave there to avoid having to mess around with a through the roof system. I am thinking tin for the roof so I will want to put up a snow deflector though to keep sliding snow from taking out the chimney (saw that happen down the road last spring).
Osburn 2300 - Basement install
Osburn 2300 - Basement install
Wall Thimble.
Wall Thimble.


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