Small Cabin

Small Cabin Forum
 - Forums - Register/Sign Up - Reply - Search - Statistics -

Small Cabin Forum / Off-Grid Living / Nu-Way propane heater review
. 1 . 2 . >>
Author Message
1300_stainless
Member
# Posted: 29 Sep 2014 12:15 - Edited by: 1300_stainless
Reply 


So I was looking for a solution to the heating needs of my 10x10 space. Since there are a lot of threads on here in regards to heating small spaces I'm going to share my experience with the Nu-Way and maybe it will help someone else.

I was going to go wood but was quite worried about regulating temperature in such a small space, as well as having to get up multiple times through the night to feed the fire. Also since I have little space to work with I was concerned with space as most of the wood stoves in my price range were larger. The last issue was that I heat with wood at home, and wasn't crazy about having to cut, split and deal with wood for my relaxation spot.

A direct vent propane would have been the ticket, but the price was considerably high. Also I believe they need a larger tank to function and that would have been inconvenient due to my location.

After a bit of research I settled on a Nu-Way propane stove. Nu-Way is a little company that manufactures small heating stoves for ice huts and deer blinds. A lot of folks use these units in outfitter tents as well. I got the model 4000 which is the largest propane model. It is equipped with 2 burners but you can use one at a time. This model is rated at 26,000 BTU. The unit vents to the outside through 3" pipe. Similar to a wood stove it does use air from inside the structure for combustion.

I'm located in Nova Scotia so I was very excited to find there is a Canadian dealer for the Nu-Way products. This eliminates the hassle of duty and long shipping times. I purchased the stove and a regulator kit. This is how it arrived.



The stove is simple in design, but looks well built. It has 2 burners inside, a valve for each. Has a heat baffle in the top. You just open the door, turn the gas on, hit the button and light the burner with a BBQ lighter. The second burner will light itself if the first is already lit. Very little assembly required. Push the knobs on, hang the door handle and screw the regulator hoses together. One side note, I had to pick up some propane safe yellow Teflon tape for the pipe fitting on the regulator hose.

Here's the little fella


Shot of the inside


I have done 2 test burns with the unit. I only have one complaint so far, and that's the paint. A fair amount flaked off during the first burn. I thought perhaps I heated the stove too quickly and should have cured the paint slower. No big deal but I'm fussy so I sanded all the flaked spots, cleaned them and applied new heat paint. During the second test burn I heated the stove up slowly to cure my new paint. Still had some of the original paint flake off yet again. Doesn't affect its function as a heater, but worth noting for sure.



This is as far as I've got. Plan is to install the stove with a heat shield around it on the inside and vent it up and then 90 degrees out through the wall. I will update this thread as my installation and use progresses. I have almost all the pieces I need, I just need to find the time to complete the install.

Gotta Gettaway
Member
# Posted: 29 Sep 2014 15:47
Reply 


Looks like a great little unit. Are you planning on storing your propane tanks outside of your cabin?

1300_stainless
Member
# Posted: 30 Sep 2014 07:27 - Edited by: 1300_stainless
Reply 


I'm actually thinking about keeping it inside. Have a buddy with an 8x8 who stores his propane tank in a box outside. He's had it freeze up on him before and said even in a structure the tank seems to get a lot of weather. The tank will be on the other side of the camp than the heater.

Gotta Gettaway
Member
# Posted: 30 Sep 2014 13:19
Reply 


Yeah that is, I believe, going to be my plan as well. Store the tank inside. I am building a little bench/bed unit and was thinking about putting the propane tank under/inside one of the benches. I know we will definitely hit the temperature where the tank could freeze this winter.

Scott G
Member
# Posted: 30 Sep 2014 21:05
Reply 


Interested to see how this works for you.

1300_stainless
Member
# Posted: 6 Oct 2014 09:36
Reply 


Was able to install the vent for my heating system this weekend. Used a standard dryer vent with 3" pipe. Cut a 6" hole in the wall. Dryer vent is mounted to a sheet metal flashing and sealed with high heat silicone. The metal flashing is then mounted and sealed with high heat silicone to cement board to act as a heat insulator. Then the cement board is mounted to the wall and sealed with caulking. Where the pipe passes though the wooden wall it has 1.5" of clearance the whole way around. (During my test burn you there was no notable heat an inch from the pipe)




lost in the woods
Member
# Posted: 13 Oct 2014 21:11
Reply 


please make sure you cabin isnt air tite im sure that thing needs air for proper combustion

1300_stainless
Member
# Posted: 14 Oct 2014 07:05
Reply 


Yes as mentioned in my first post it does require inside air for combustion, same as most wood stoves. That's important to note. My cabin is far from air tight and I always have the windows open when using the heater, stove, lantern, candles or any type of combustion.

Gotta Gettaway
Member
# Posted: 15 Oct 2014 20:51
Reply 


How is it in terms of heating your place? I am interested in how efficient it is as well. Let us know as you get use of it.

1300_stainless
Member
# Posted: 16 Oct 2014 08:00
Reply 


Finally got the stove in and operational. Placed it inside a steel heat shield to reduce clearances. Believe it or not all the metal in the heat shield is pretty much just the way it sat in the scrap pile. I cut the about an inch off of each piece of angle iron, painted it and bolted the 2 pieces together. It turned out great. Pure luck.

I've run the stove a few times, a little longer each time. I check often to see if things are getting warm and functioning properly. So far so good.

It hasn't gotten terribly cold yet but with one burner on high it takes the chill off very quickly. Sunday morning we ran the stove for a while when we got up as it was chilly. I spoke with my father and he said his thermometer at the house read -0.3 Celsius when he woke up. We were comfortable with one burner lit. We were dressed warmly too.

I plan to get a thermometer for the camp to monitor how much of a difference the stove will make and how quickly. Keep in mind that due to budget my camp isn't insulated this year either.

Next step is to plumb the propane lines so that the heating stove and cook stove can use the same tank of fuel.




Gotta Gettaway
Member
# Posted: 17 Oct 2014 07:39
Reply 


Looking great! Keep the feedback coming as you learn. I'm settled on getting one, but me, on the other Hand, I will be insulating in the coming weeks before I buy the stove.

1300_stainless
Member
# Posted: 17 Oct 2014 11:12
Reply 


Insulation is defiantly a good plan and I think a heater like this will serve you very well if you're insulated. Just make sure you've got a source of fresh air for the stoves combustion. Unfortunately this winter my finances left me with the option of insulation and no heat, or heat and no insulation.

Gotta Gettaway
Member
# Posted: 17 Oct 2014 12:06
Reply 


Yeah completely understandable. That's why I've decided just to use the old home depot card for insulation and will pay it off over the winter. Having my cabin just built this summer, I'm dying to go up there to stay this winter to xc ski, hunt, etc. I felt like I would rather seal it up and in the coming weeks I will go for the stove.

As far as ventilation is concerned, cracking a Window and using a CO detector should suffice, eh?

1300_stainless
Member
# Posted: 17 Oct 2014 13:05
Reply 


Cracked window and Co2 detector is what I do. I only brought it up again because as you insulate you're making the cabin more air tight. While the Nu-Way stove exhaust is vented, it is not a "direct vent" heater and uses air inside the structure for combustion. (Direct vent heaters pull combustion air from outside)

Gotta Gettaway
Member
# Posted: 17 Oct 2014 13:42
Reply 


That is the reason I wanted this stove. Didn't want to have to put two holes in my newly sided baby.

creeky
Member
# Posted: 18 Oct 2014 19:40
Reply 


Direct vent heaters only use one hole. The pipe goes directly from the back of the heater thru the wall and is closed up with a vent cap (included). This means your stove pipe (included) is a foot long or so.

The inlet pipe goes around the the outlet pipe. This keeps the outlet pipe away from all combustibles. yes it's two, two, two pipes in one.

The other advantage is that the interior clearances are small. The heater i have needs two inches on each side. The frame has a 1 inch gap against the wall. And 5" from the floor. So the heater extends into the room by maybe 6". compact.

1300_stainless
Member
# Posted: 29 Oct 2014 07:35
Reply 


Quick update. It's not below freezing yet, but it's starting to get chilly. Used the Nu-Way when I got up Sun morning. All these temperatures are approximate as I have an old school mercury thermometer (not digital) in the camp. I will also mention I did have one burner of the cook stove on to make my breakfast. Window was cracked a touch. Camp is not insulated.

It was about 11.5 degrees celcius when I lit the Nu-Way. Turned one burner on medium. In ten minutes it rose to 15 celcius. At that time I turned the burner down as low as it would go and the temperature did not drop over the next ten minutes. After I shut the cook stove off I left the Nu-Way on low for an additional ten minutes and the temperature did not drop and may have even risen about a 1/2 a degree C. At this point I was ready to head out and shut the heater down.

So far I am pleased with the unit. I'm anxious to see how it works when it gets "winter" cold.

man7sell
Member
# Posted: 31 Dec 2014 17:32
Reply 


This is very interesting, I've been looking for a small heater for my cabin. At present I have to heat with electricity which is fine when its working. Reading about using the air inside the cabin for the combustion I have a suggestion that will greatly improve it's efficiency.

When I lived on a boat I had a small diesel heater. It was not very efficient. and the boat was very drafty when it was running, brining in cold air from the outside. I took some flexible hose about 2" diameter and ran it from the outside (in a cockpit lazaret) to just below the heater. It ended in a plastic fitting that had a screen on it to keep out critters.

Then running the heater, it draws outside are through the hose and gave the boat a slight positive pressure that stopped all drafts. After running it for an hour I found I had to dial it all the way down to 1, (dial when 1 through 10). Any more than 1 and it would cook you out of the boat.

So just a though.

1300_stainless
Member
# Posted: 13 Jan 2015 09:29 - Edited by: 1300_stainless
Reply 


Sorry for the lack of updates. Haven't been able to spend as much time in the woods this winter as I was hoping.

Man7sell, that's a great idea. I'll have to wait until summer. I have a steel heat shield below and around the stove so I will probably have to remove the stove to cut a hole in the shield. The bottom of the stove has a large screened opening, perhaps I can have a sheet metal "funnel" of sorts made that encloses the open part of the stove and feeds it fresh air.

Does anyone think that placing a fire brick on each side of the stove would help out by adding some thermal mass??

I've also got a bit of coin stashed away. Hoping to insulate the roof in spring when it's warm enough to work.

1300_stainless
Member
# Posted: 21 Oct 2015 07:37
Reply 


Just a little update. It's been about a year and so far I am pleased with the performance the Nu-Way stove offers for the price. There are a few spots where the finish has flaked off at this point. It's a bit crude in it's aesthetics but is certainly a functional heater. The quality is there where it counts (gas valves and such). I still plan to tinker with it here and there and make small improvements. (Fresh air vent, maybe add a draft to the flue, surround it with fire bricks for thermal mass,etc)

Unfortunately I haven't had chance to add a fresh air vent yet like I had planned. I have however insulated the ceiling of my camp as well as added an auto switching, dual tank, propane regulator. Keeps my heat on if one tank goes dry during the evening.

This time of year running one burner on medium keeps the lower part of the camp comfortable and the top bunk nice and toasty. I plan to add a fan to help circulate the heat.

bobrok
Member
# Posted: 21 Oct 2015 08:51
Reply 


Quoting: 1300_stainless
add a fan to help circulate the heat


Best thing I did, with an old ceiling fan. What a huge, huge difference it makes in equalizing the entire structure. I only have 8' ceilings and before the fan I measured up to a 15F temp difference between ceiling and floor. Now even the far corners are comfortable.

Eva91
Member
# Posted: 2 Nov 2015 20:58
Reply 


I am considering one of these to heat my 16 x 16 cabin while I am at work. To keep the chill off. How much propane have you gone through, have you noticed? Per week or however often you use it? I am trying to figure out costs. Thanks!

1300_stainless
Member
# Posted: 3 Nov 2015 06:33
Reply 


Hey Eva91,

I can heat my 10x10 a few nights with one tank, 3 or more I'd say. I usually only have one burner on. In the daytime I am outside and turn the heat off. I don't allow the stove to run very long without attendance. I also cook with propane so that's a factor in my propane consumption as well. Somewhere online I had found a chart that listed the approximate burn length on each setting, but I can't find it anymore.

Gotta Gettaway
Member
# Posted: 3 Nov 2015 14:37 - Edited by: Gotta Gettaway
Reply 


1300, what specifically did you use to do your total install? Obviously the 3 inch piping to run from it. Single walled? My stove should be here in the next couple days, so just trying to plan a trip into town for all my installation materials. I read above about your install roughly just wanting a little more detail. Also wanted to know if you have had any heat related issue with your wall and fascia above the dryer cent itself?

1300_stainless
Member
# Posted: 3 Nov 2015 18:13
Reply 


Hey GG,

The stove is actually vented with 3" aluminum dryer pipe. Should be available at most big hardware stores, or if you're in a small town like myself they can order it for you (4" is more commonly used and stocked). A few straight stretches and a few adjustable elbows. Some sheet metal screws to secure it together and some sealants for the joints. I secured it to the stove with a hose clamp. It took a little manipulating to get the pipe on.

My vent set up as described above had to be modified this year. The interior wall was getting too warm for my liking. The set up now is the dryer vent mounted to the metal sheet. Then I have a 2 layer cement board "ring" between the metal sheet and wall. (2 squares with very large diameter holes in the center.) Everything is sealed well with high temp silicone. This allows a lot of air space between the hot dryer vent and wall. As well as less cement board absorbing, and storing, heat. Working well as of yet. The exterior above and around the dryer vent looks to be unaffected so far.

Grayhorn
Member
# Posted: 12 Nov 2015 12:40
Reply 


1300-stainless, I'm a new member and just finished reading your posts. Just wondering where in Canada can I get the nu-way. Great post, am most interested in the little stove. Grayhorn

1300_stainless
Member
# Posted: 12 Nov 2015 14:28 - Edited by: 1300_stainless
Reply 


Hey Grayhorn, unfortunately I think the Canadian supplier I purchased from may have went out of business. It was a small home based business and I can't find the website anymore . Your best bet would likely be to call Nu-Way and inquire if they have a Canadian distributor still.

EDIT: They have a FB page, but it hasn't had activity for a long time. https://www.facebook.com/Canadian-Sporting-Optics-208985532456264/

Grayhorn
Member
# Posted: 12 Nov 2015 14:57
Reply 


1300-stainless, First thank you for your reply. I will contact the company in the US. I'm going to get a 4000 for sure. What you have done with your posting has surely given a lot of folks the incentive to go for it themselves. Appreciate all your posts. Grayhorn

Gotta Gettaway
Member
# Posted: 12 Nov 2015 18:12
Reply 


Hi 1300 and Gray,

1300 thanks for all the information. My stove came in today and I am going to the cabin for a combo hunting trip and stove install from tomorrow through Tuesday. I will update with pics. And am following a similar install to you, although slightly different.

Gray - I couldn't get in touch to place an order through any Canadian supplier. I had to go straight through the company. It took a couple weeks to receive, and ended up costing almost double the website price in Canadian funds once shipping, duty, taxes and conversion rate were accounted. I still think it is worth it though because install will be a fraction of the cost of a wood stove install and hopefully should. Be great to heat my 96 Sq ft.

Grayhorn
Member
# Posted: 13 Nov 2015 17:33
Reply 


Gotta, Hope it is a great weekend for you. Thanks for the info and will be waiting for the pics and all once you get set up and fired for the first time. Great stuff, Grayhorn

. 1 . 2 . >>
Your reply
Bold Style  Italic Style  Underlined Style  Thumbnail Image Link  Large Image Link  URL Link           :) ;) :-( :confused: More smilies...

» Username  » Password 
Only registered users can post here. Please enter your login/password details before posting a message, or register here first.