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Brettny
Member
# Posted: 5 Aug 2020 11:36
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Unless your getting very cheap batteries hooking up that many solar pannels dials going to Be very costly. Short loads like you would use in a shop I would look into the cost difference to running a generator. Sure "free" power is nice but remember you only have one piece of a huge solar array, the pannels. Charge controllers, large DC breakers, batteries all cost. Then you add in that your site dosnt get that much sun..

ICC
Member
# Posted: 5 Aug 2020 14:09
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Quoting: paulz
How much battery? Good point.


That is your starting point.

paulz
Member
# Posted: 6 Aug 2020 10:06
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OK, I will concentrate on battery. Not sure how to figure it though. For example, in the shop that I am building, downhill from the cabin, I have right now 2 group 24 deep cycle batteries in parallel hooked to 250 watts of solar and an inverter. Yesterday I ran saws, a sander and a planer off an on. Battery voltage ran down to 12.0 at times, and when the sun hit the panels it rose to 13 at times, but at the end of day it was down to 12.2 unloaded. If I take a day off they will get back up to 12.5, but if I don't it will continue a cumulus drain.

If I envision a larger system to run a compressor, lathe or what not, it seems like it would be the same scenario, how much time I can work vs. how much recovery time.

I guess that's how solar works..

paulz
Member
# Posted: 6 Aug 2020 10:10
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Quoting: Brettny
Unless your getting very cheap batteries hooking up that many solar pannels dials going to Be very costly. Short loads like you would use in a shop I would look into the cost difference to running a generator. Sure "free" power is nice but remember you only have one piece of a huge solar array, the pannels. Charge controllers, large DC breakers, batteries all cost. Then you add in that your site dosnt get that much sun..



Sorry Brett, just saw your post. Funny sometimes posts seem to pop up that weren't there last I checked.

Yes I've been thinking about good old generator power. I ran my old trusty 110v generator yesterday to run a belt sander for a good bit of time and didn't want to run my batteries down too much. While it was running I also plugged in a battery charger.

So yes, generator power, at least for 'shady' me, is still an important part of the power puzzle.

paulz
Member
# Posted: 6 Aug 2020 10:16
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Before I came across all these panels, I had bought 12 panels (first post on this thread), and later an Epever charge controller. I put that on back burner when this other stuff came along but I think I should probably back up and get that going, connected to the 4 matching group 24 deep cycle lead batteries I have just sitting, and see what that gets me.

And continue my solar learning experience.

garrybrown
Member
# Posted: 24 Aug 2020 08:04
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I actually just bought two of the 100 watt solar panels the other day for my van build. Getting them in Tuesday.

paulz
Member
# Posted: 16 Sep 2020 19:21
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I'd like to hook up a few of my hoard of solar panels, in series, to the EP Tracer SCC with the remote meter and 4 deep cycle batteries in parallel, just so I get some experience. Nothing to power at present, I could hook up an inverter and have a disco dance party I guess.

The SCC says 150v pv input, which would be several panels, but only 520 watts at 12v, or two of the 260 watt panels. Is that right?

The black MP4 wires are fine for the pv hookup I assume. I also got a bunch of green wire, 6AWG, not sure where that was being used. Would that suffice for SCC to batteries? How about battery to battery? Or do I need 0-1 AWG?
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ICC
Member
# Posted: 16 Sep 2020 20:51
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Quoting: paulz
green wire


Green is the same as bare; used ONLY for ground wires.


Quoting: paulz
The SCC says 150v pv input, which would be several panels, but only 520 watts at 12v, or two of the 260 watt panels. Is that right?


Yes there are watt input limits as well as max voltage input limits, max current OUTPUT too, so if those numbers are what the manual for the CC states, that is correct. The max watts for the CC is always lowest for 12 volt batteries and increases for 24, 48..... doubles for 24, doubles again for 48. And remember that the listed max voltage is the sum of the Voc panel voltage multiplied by 1.25 (to cover you for cold weather voltage increase); Or is from what a string calculator, if available for that CC, computes for input weather data along with the panel specs and quantity.

ICC
Member
# Posted: 16 Sep 2020 20:53
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Also, FYI, if you connect more than two in parallel you should have a fuse or breaker for each parallel panel or series string of panels.

paulz
Member
# Posted: 16 Sep 2020 21:56 - Edited by: paulz
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The SCC Manual confuses me, please have a look:

https://www.epsolarpv.com/upload/cert/file/2003/Tracer-BN-SMS-EL-V1.2.pdf

The box, in the image in my post above, shows the 520 watt max pv input, but page 10 shows max pv array power 1560W. It also shows rate charge power 520W, maybe the box label is wrong? Mine is the bottom one 40 amp.

Thanks ICC.

ICC
Member
# Posted: 16 Sep 2020 22:37
Reply 


Here's what I make of it. The unit is rated for a max charge current of 40 amps. Divide the rated 520 watts by 12 volts and you get 43.33333 That is close enough. To the rated 40.

You can wire up more watts worth of panels, up to 1560 watts total, but the CC will not exceed a charge rate of 40 amps. Any extra available incoming watts will be "burned off" by the CC. That creates heat and that can be the downside of overpaneling by too great of an amount. Running hot for extended periods can shorten electronic components life. Actually it will shorten life, not just "can". That is the main reason computer data centers are run quite cool; air conditioned down to where most people wear sweaters.

The advantage of overpaneling a little is that when the sun is less than optimum the CV can make up some of what is missing from the extra panel capacity.

paulz
Member
# Posted: 16 Sep 2020 23:06 - Edited by: paulz
Reply 


That makes sense. So 1560 divided by my 260W panels is 6 panels. The panels are rated at 8.35 IMPP, 6 would be 50 amps. Panel VOC is 38.5V, 6 would be 231V, way over the 138V spec.

Sounds like maybe 4-5 panels max.

EDIT: Hmm, 2 strings of 3 panels.. 1560W, 50A and only 115V

Nobadays
Member
# Posted: 17 Sep 2020 11:05
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We are using 6x245w and 3x 250w panels with nearly identical amps/volts. VOC=37.5, ISC= 8.68, so really close to your output. We run 3s/3p for 2,220 watts total.

From what I have read it is quite common to stick with 3s unless you are linking small panels... of the same output.

That is theoretically 112.5v max, and 26.04 amps. We are using a Schneider 60/150 charge controller and it handles the input easily. We could probably add another string but wire size from the combiner to the SCC would have to be increased to do that. We have plenty of power.

paulz
Member
# Posted: 17 Sep 2020 17:22
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Sound good Nobs. I'm going to try 3s/2p but I need to get MC4 branch connectors to do parallel. Surprised in all the cabling I got there were none.

Thanks!

Nobadays
Member
# Posted: 17 Sep 2020 18:46
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If you are going to work with solar, a good MC4 crimper is a must. This ONE is a pretty cheap set and comes with connectors and the tools to tighten and uncoupled the connectors. A wye connector like THIS will let you do 3s2p pretty neatly.

Have fun!

justinbowser
Member
# Posted: 17 Sep 2020 22:05
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If I were you I would also wire your bank as 24V unless you have already invested in a 12V inverter.

paulz
Member
# Posted: 17 Sep 2020 22:35 - Edited by: paulz
Reply 


Got the wye connectors coming. Justin, unfortunately I have a couple of 12 volt inverters I use.

Don't suppose I could put the two inverters in series. Or, I see they make 40 amp 24 to 12v step down converters for $30. I guess with that I could double the pv wattage.

paulz
Member
# Posted: 18 Sep 2020 10:15 - Edited by: paulz
Reply 


I did some searching, believe it or not others have asked about series connecting 12v inverters. The general answer no but no explanation why. I'm intrigued, not that I really need to, just what would happen.

Anyway with my SCC limited to 40 amp pv input, going to 24v and upping the wattage would raise the amps above the 40 amp limit I'm already hitting at 12v. Right? Amps are cumulative, parallel or series?

justinbowser
Member
# Posted: 18 Sep 2020 10:40
Reply 


Doubling your battery bank voltage cuts the amp input requirement to an inverter roughly in half for the same watt output. It all boils down to the equation P=I x E. A side benefit of upping the voltage is that since the current decreases your wire size can also safely decrease which saves you a little money. As far as stringing together inverters in series I doubt it would work.

paulz
Member
# Posted: 18 Sep 2020 11:17
Reply 


Thanks Justin. I'm not getting it, look at the specs below. At the bottom it says 'Max PV input current 40A'. In the chart above that it says 'Max PV array power 1560W/12V or 3120W/24V'.

But if you divide 1560 or 3120 by 12 or 24 you get 130A, way over the 40 mentioned.

What am I doing wrong?
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