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Small Cabin Forum / Member's Projects and Photos / New build - central SK
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fiftyfifty
Member
# Posted: 24 Nov 2021 08:53
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That cutter is so cool! Nice work!

Crake
Member
# Posted: 31 Jan 2022 14:15 - Edited by: Crake
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January 2022 update

This past weekend my daughter and I headed up to the quarter for an overnight stay on our way to the family farm. The road north of my property was completely blown shut with snow. We stacked the Pelican sled full of styrofoam, tools and overnight supplies, and sledded two miles up the road and across the pasture just as darkness fell.

Once we reached the edge of the forest, I dumped the Pelican sled and we slowly plowed a trail into the cabin. The snow was well above my knees and solid powder right to the ground. The Tundra either bogged down or was constantly tipping over. I resigned myself to walk alongside it until we reached the cabin. Exhausting work! I dropped my daughter off and got the Gstove going, caught my breath and headed back for the Pelican. Way easier going once the trail in was broken in.

The cabin was pretty snowed in. We pulled everything out and started installing the roof styrofoam between the rafters. I taped up all the seams with tuck tape. There will be a few spots to fill with foam sealant before the ceiling boards go on.

We stopped halfway and cooked some seasoned moose tenderloin in bacon grease, then mixed it into some mushroom soup for gravy. Absolutely outstanding meal. I attacked the rest of the ceiling, finishing up around 11pm.

The insulated roof made an immediate difference. Everything above the top bunk was incredibly warm. The lower half of the cabin is still fairly cool, so I'm going to rig a small 12VDC fan hooked to my car battery to circulate the air inside the cabin. It will have to do until I can pick up a firestove fan.

I didn't sleep so well, as I had to stoke the stove every two hours or so. Daughter was out cold all night long, waking only to mumble/talk in her sleep, haha... The coyotes were howling up a storm at one point, and the nighttime sky was radiant with stars. How quickly I forget how quiet and peaceful it is out there.

We woke around 6am and packed up to sled out. Quite the adventure getting in and out in the winter but I enjoyed every minute of it! Next weekend - snowshoeing adventure time!

"Crake"
Cabin at night
Cabin at night
Moose supper
Moose supper
Ceiling back
Ceiling back
Ceiling front
Ceiling front


Crake
Member
# Posted: 31 Jan 2022 15:10
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More photos...
Window at night
Window at night
Winter cabin
Winter cabin
1985 Tundra
1985 Tundra
Looking back
Looking back


BRADISH
Member
# Posted: 31 Jan 2022 17:43
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Surprised the Tundra didn't manage better. The FIL has a 92 and it seems to handle more than I ever think it will.

Quite the cozy little cabin! Makes each project far more manageable when it's on that kind of scale.

Crake
Member
# Posted: 1 Feb 2022 08:45
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BRADISH
It certainly is a tippy little machine in deep powder. I'm starting to understand why they were nicknamed "Tumblers". I may be a little oversized for such a little sled (6', 190 lbs) - I'm probably not getting the best flotation out of it. Might have to look into getting a long track machine down the road.

BRADISH
Member
# Posted: 1 Feb 2022 11:09
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Quoting: Crake
It certainly is a tippy little machine in deep powder. I'm starting to understand why they were nicknamed "Tumblers". I may be a little oversized for such a little sled (6', 190 lbs) - I'm probably not getting the best flotation out of it. Might have to look into getting a long track machine down the road.

Well, with me at 6'3" and 225 you are certainly in good company. Rather than just a long track, you might specifically look for a 'wide track' option. Not always the most plentiful, but there are certainly options out there. A lot of these options are known for their hauling capabilities, which may serve you well for your purposes getting things/people in & out of the cabin.

Happy trails.

arp
Member
# Posted: 4 Feb 2022 18:25
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Great spot you have there Crake. The memories will be priceless.
You might want to check out Caframo for a fan. They're Canadian (Ontario). I have one of the Seekr models. The black unguarded one. Works great off a car battery. Lasts all night. The EcoFan looks like a good idea because it doesn't need any power and you have the stove going.

Crake
Member
# Posted: 16 Mar 2022 08:50
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February 2022

1st snowshoe into the cabin! A friend of mine bravely volunteered to shoe in with me to do some interior insulating. The temperatures were still in the -20c range with deep powdery snow. It was about a mile long hike in from the south pulling about 150lbs of gear on the Pelican sled. We took turns pulling the sled and dragging in what turned out to be extremely awkward 4x8 styrofoam sheets. I still can't decide which was worse.

Once we arrived we enjoyed a nice -20c glass of apple flavored whiskey while the stove heated up. I'd dragged in about 50 lbs of nice dry pallet wood scraps specifically for heating, as I didn't want to be scrounging for local firewood in that deep snow.

(continued)
Snowshoe Trip 1
Snowshoe Trip 1
Snowshoe Trip 2
Snowshoe Trip 2
Cabin through the trees
Cabin through the trees
Ice cold whiskey
Ice cold whiskey


Crake
Member
# Posted: 16 Mar 2022 08:57
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February 2022 continued

Once we'd emptied the cabin we set to work on the walls. The styrofoam sheets were awesome to work with - only 3/4" thick and easily cut with a box cutter. Once fitted into their respective recesses, I taped them in place with tuck tape which appears to make a nice airtight seal. I plan to come back in the spring and cover the sheets with interior pallet board. Make it look more like a cabin and less like a spaceship...

We insulated and taped every nook with exception of the firestove corner - I'll save that for the spring trip as we didn't want to work around that pipin' hot stove. I was cooking up a moose stew over the stove while we worked and we enjoyed an excellent hot winter meal around 8pm.

(continued)
1st panel
1st panel
Back wall
Back wall
Stew
Stew


Crake
Member
# Posted: 16 Mar 2022 09:14 - Edited by: Crake
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February 2022 continued

After supper we set up a board game on the folding table and tied into a nice bottle of Saskatchewan whiskey. By 1am we were ready to rack in.

I rigged up my small 12VDC fan off the car battery and experimented with a few different placements to try to circulate the air.

By midnight it was around -30c outside.

I laid facing the stove with a convenient stockpile of pallet wood nearby, so I could stoke it without getting out of my cot. My friend took the top bunk. Apparently it was hot as a sauna in the peak, as he spent most of the night outside his sleeping bag. The floor space under my cot remained exceptionally cold.

We agreed the 12VDC fan was woefully underpowered for the task - it simply doesn't move the air in a high enough volume to evenly circulate the heat. I'm going to watch the Princess Auto flyers and see if their stovetop fans come on sale in the near future.

We snowshoed out the following morning. What took us 90 minutes the day before only took 20 minutes on the way out. It definitely helps having a broken trail to shoe back on!

I left behind enough styrofoam to finish the ceiling and stove nook. I've planned one more snowshoe trip in before the snow melts. If the temperatures cooperate, I'll be able to remove the stove and finish the insulation behind it, install a proper heat shield and start finishing the interior with more pallet board.

"Crake"
Nighttime
Nighttime


Aklogcabin
Member
# Posted: 16 Mar 2022 11:43
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Really nice story man. I use snogos a lot. I have a wide track for freight pulling. I've currently got over a thousand pounds to get out. But nothing like reaching the cabin n settling in. Ours is 16x24 with 2 floors.
Nice thing about cabins is that each one has its own ombiance n memories.
Our cabin n wonderful daughter
Our cabin n wonderful daughter
My chill spot
My chill spot


travellerw
Member
# Posted: 16 Mar 2022 12:21
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Quoting: Crake
We agreed the 12VDC fan was woefully underpowered for the task - it simply doesn't move the air in a high enough volume to evenly circulate the heat. I'm going to watch the Princess Auto flyers and see if their stovetop fans come on sale in the near future.


Damn Canadian Tire just had a sale of those fans (I bought one). Watch their website too. CT sells actual EcoFan brand. Its better than the PA versions.

jsahara24
Member
# Posted: 16 Mar 2022 13:20
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Very Nice! Looks like a good time, and productive!

Crake
Member
# Posted: 16 Mar 2022 13:44
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Quoting: travellerw
Damn Canadian Tire just had a sale of those fans (I bought one). Watch their website too. CT sells actual EcoFan brand. Its better than the PA versions.


I've been waiting for the 4-blade one at Princess Auto to come one sale. My dad has one in his hunting shack and it really moves the air. I like the maple leaf they built into the frame - proud canuck that I am... (pictured below)
Fan
Fan


BRADISH
Member
# Posted: 17 Mar 2022 02:13
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Looks like the kind of trip memories are made from! What a great time..

gcrank1
Member
# Posted: 17 Mar 2022 11:01
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My little 12v x 6" moves the air in our 16x24 cath ceiling place good enough. I put it in the cold corner to push the cold air toward the peak ridge rather than trying to push the warm from the stove. That kicks the warm air down and around.
Good thing about a cold corner is you can have your own indoor fridge

Crake
Member
# Posted: 17 Mar 2022 11:36
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Quoting: gcrank1
My little 12v x 6" moves the air in our 16x24 cath ceiling place good enough.


I tried a few different locations - hung it up in the peak near the back of the cabin to try to push the hot air down, and down below to push the cold air up. It could be that my fan has a low CFM. And I suppose hot/cold issues only manifest for a small portion of the year...

gcrank1
Member
# Posted: 17 Mar 2022 11:47 - Edited by: gcrank1
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Yeah, maybe all you need is a 'bigger' 12v fan. My two were inexpensive 20yrs ago. They look like a mini caged blade house fan with a long cig-plug lead.
I see them on Amazon, 6" clip-on, auto/rv/etc, about $20.
Ive had to pull them both apart a few times to lube the cheap sleeve bearings, they slow over time to squeal if I dont. Its an easy service.
There are similar 120vac fans but no sense running an inverter for simple elec needs if you are lugging a battery.
Btw, are you using an LFP?

Crake
Member
# Posted: 17 Mar 2022 12:03
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Quoting: gcrank1
Btw, are you using an LFP?


Nope - just an old 12VDC automobile battery. I tuck it in behind my little chair in the corner and run anything that needs a zap off that. So far only the fan and the odd cell phone top-up. I have a little solar charger on the south wall of the cabin that keeps it topped up while I'm away.

gcrank1
Member
# Posted: 17 Mar 2022 12:17
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When I started out in '84ish at our 1st build it was a 'starting' battery too, and an old one that wouldnt start my car anymore. I figured it had more amp-hours than it did, but it worked enough to get me to a 'marine deep cycle', again used. It was too weak for my friends trolling motor use but sure was an improvement over a starting battery.
If you have some fishing friends hit 'em up for when they need to get a new deep cycle to give you the battery and you provide a junk 'core charge' bat. Ive been keeping a couple junk bats around for situations like that.
With your place, the cold and all, I think lead-acid is the way to go as long as it stays there. If you were transporting an LFP back home, they are substantially lighter for the amp-hours they provide. I'll take a guess that a 5ish# 20ah LFP, about the size 3"x7"x7" would give you more amp-hours than you get now.

Crake
Member
# Posted: 17 Mar 2022 14:13
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Quoting: gcrank1
With your place, the cold and all, I think lead-acid is the way to go as long as it stays there. If you were transporting an LFP back home, they are substantially lighter for the amp-hours they provide.


Yep my thoughts exactly. I recently bought a few of LFPs from Canadian Tire for work - they pack a lot of juice in a small package. I'll see how long the lead acid battery lasts. Might upgrade down the road.

I still have an old 2-stroke jenny I left in a Rubbermaid cache out at my old moose camp. Would have to go for a quad trip to retrieve it. So far I haven't run into a need for on-site AC power - most of my carpentry tools are battery-operated.

gcrank1
Member
# Posted: 17 Mar 2022 14:33
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Do they make a plug-in accessory device to use on your power tool bats?

Crake
Member
# Posted: 21 Mar 2022 10:25
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Quoting: gcrank1
Do they make a plug-in accessory device to use on your power tool bats?


I looked into that. Most of my stuff is DeWalt and they make a couple of nice adaptors for the 20W batteries - DC-to-USB, as well as modified sine inverters. Would certainly be a great way to have portable power when I need it.

I talked to my brother in law about heat distribution - he suggested drawing the air from the peak down to the floor area by way of a tin duct running vertically up the back wall. Could rig a couple 12VDC fans to draw warm air into the top duct and spit it out the bottom. I may have to explore this idea further.

gcrank1
Member
# Posted: 21 Mar 2022 10:51 - Edited by: gcrank1
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Btdt, imo, too much fabbing when all ya gotta do is kick the air around your room; ie, fan low in the cold 'corner' aimed toward the middle peak. That mixes the air temps. Keep the speed down and direction such that you dont feel a cooling draft across your skin.
Keep looking for the best placement anyway, it costs nothing in time or money to try a bit more.

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