Small Cabin

Small Cabin Forum
 - Forums - Register/Sign Up - Reply - Search - Statistics -

Small Cabin Forum / Off Topic / What do you use for protection while at your cabin, gun control issues
<< . 1 . 2 . 3 . 4 . 5 . 6 . 7 . 8 . 9 . 10 . 11 . >>
Author Message
rockymtngal
Member
# Posted: 28 Aug 2012 22:52
Reply 


I come here to learn ALL aspects of living amongst people in an environment that I am newly taking part in (very rural). Sometimes it's easier to ask folks that seem to have knowledge of things that are helpful, but not my immediate neighbors so i dont draw attention to myself at my property. We bought in a regulated "no hunting - no shooting " area, but just yesterday, heard gunshots very close. I am a female at my property by myself a lot of the time and don't want to be vulnerable.

Just like not wanting to ask the local building official about my foundation, but i know the experts here will gladly help

Captain winehead
# Posted: 28 Aug 2012 23:02
Reply 


Agreed, I think I was surprised to see the subject of protection come up. Seemed out of place from my perspective. I grew up knowing that cabins are left unlocked, so anyone lost in the woods could find warmth, shelter and even food. It's how it always was.

neb
Member
# Posted: 28 Aug 2012 23:29
Reply 


I live in the west and guns are a way of live here. I have some guns but don't hunt with much any more but would not think twice if I had to scare someone off by shooting in the air. Guns are a part of peoples lifes here and if used in the right way and by responsiable people I see no harm. If you some don't believe in guns so it be and I see you the same as any other person. Great post Malamute and Owen.

Malamute
Member
# Posted: 29 Aug 2012 00:17
Reply 


Well said Neb.

Spudmasher1
Member
# Posted: 29 Aug 2012 03:51
Reply 


The cabin spot I am building on is a mile and half in any direction of the road. A person would have to cross several fences and walk some distance to step foot into the pasture yet last year as I was hunting I had a man walk 2 miles, I watched him with his blaze orange cross fence line after fence line, stop and read then continue onto posted private land until I stopped him from a ground blind less then 4 feet from the fence he was walking down. My words that scared the s*^t out of him were "Do you know who's land your on?" I was sitting against a tree low and he had no idea I was there.

I asked him to unload his gun, which he did and return along his same tracks to his pickup. He claimed to be lost and wasn't sure where he was yet a mile away from where he left me he headed straight to his pickup.

I don't take kindly to people who disturb what is mine, my right to hunt on my land, my right to be where I belong, not them.

I support the right to bear arms.

OwenChristensen
Member
# Posted: 29 Aug 2012 07:37 - Edited by: OwenChristensen
Reply 


Some good points here. One, I feel safe at my cabin. No need for protection. Not from black bears, wolves or lions. I'd like to see them. No need from other humans. There's far less desparadoes there than in the cities. Any trespassers are not bad just snoopy. I doubt there ever will be a problem.
One the other hand, my wife does not feel as safe there as at home. I always bring guns for entertainment or hunting. I'm sure if I wasn't there she'd have a gun there for her reasons. I respect that. We all have that right.
Two people, same place, different comfort levels a neither is wrong.

Owen

exsailor
Member
# Posted: 29 Aug 2012 09:26 - Edited by: exsailor
Reply 


This thread is only slightly unique on the forum. Yes, we talk about all kinds of things here. This is one of the most controversial topics, unless you look at the one concerning population, number of children, and use of our world's resources. For the most part we discuss these things with restraint and intelligence. Sometime feelings flare, and it is almost always civil. In a way this thread is like a car wreck on the side of the road or a police car with flashing lights at the side of the road. You know what happened but people feel the need to look; call it society's morbid curiosity. In this case we looked and felt compelled to comment.
I grew up in the country in a house with loaded guns stored in the corner. As kids we didn't touch them we knew they killed, and Dad would light our bottoms up if we did. We ate a lot of game growing up, and knew what brought home supper. From talking to my friends in the area, a lot of us grew up in the same situation, loaded guns openly available in the home. Another way to describe the difference of then and today is. At a very young age we were taught to respect guns for what they did and could do. In the cities, lets face it we are less rural and more urban these days, children don't get the same exposure and are taught the same respect my peers learned at a young age. Actually I think being taught respect for guns is just a small part of it. There is the respect of life, property, self and others that seems to be sorely lacking in today's society. For us it was common sense and common knowledge. That being said I have no idea how guns were stored my brothers and sisters were toddlers and in our younger years. It was a rite of passage to get your own gun. It involved training and practice Under Supervision. I only handled my gun when my Dad was around to watch me. When I proved myself trained and responsible, then I could shoot and hunt unsupervised.
The world is not quite as safe as it once was. It is a proven fact life is less gentle now than it was even in the eighties and definitely more so than the fifties. I was in High school before we ever locked the doors to our home. I graduated in 1972. Guns are still part of my life and my family's life. Once say about the mid eighties, I can't remember the exact date as I was overseas. My Mom was alone in the house. While in the kitchen, she heard the front door open. By the time she got to the kitchen door, a stranger was in the middle of the living room. She reached down and picked up a shotgun that was at the kitchen door and wall corner. As she pointed it at him, she asked what he was doing there. He said he just came in to see if everything was okay. Well everything was okay once he left the house, got back in his car and left. She started latching the screen door after that incident.
The point of my story is something bad might have happened, but it didn't. This happened in a rural setting 5 miles out of town. The closest neighbor was a half mile away. We had state and county police to protect us. We didn't qualify for city protection. Police response time would have been worthless in this case. We rarely hear about the crimes deterred because of the presence of a gun. Media doesn't get the same mileage out of a crime prevented story, as they get out of a terrible tragedy that happened in the country. A man has the responsibility to protect his family. I feel very strongly about that. By the time the police arrive all they can do is survey the crime scene and take the descriptions. Medical help both physical and in some cases mental is always after the fact. It is not paranoid to be prepared for the worse; better to be prepared 5 years early than 5 seconds late. All that being said nothing changes minds as much as the sound of a 12 gauge shotgun racking a shell into the chamber in the dark. If they keep coming they intended harm and force is justified. I am a peaceful person, but if trouble come looking, it hasn't found a victim.

wakeslayer
Member
# Posted: 29 Aug 2012 09:56
Reply 


Well said, ExSailor.

trollbridge
Member
# Posted: 29 Aug 2012 13:01
Reply 


Malamute, my morning glories are doing well too

Good post ex sailor. Thanks for taking the time to write it.

We all have a variety of reasons for owning a gun or not. And we all have cabins in different regions and countries, thus having different safety concerns. The important thing to keep in mind is that we respect each other's choices. A lively discussion can certainly take place without toes getting stepped on if we each try to place ourselves in the others shoes. Not saying we have to agree but we can disagree with respect.

Captain wine head
# Posted: 29 Aug 2012 19:45
Reply 


Geography is the deciding factor on perceived threat. My land is rural, cottage country as we say here, and generations of farmers, local families. A rifle is for hunting or pests. We don't have as much human threat, drunk drivers or boaters would be the number one killer. Plenty of police around in town, though I suspect they aren't too busy. Life here is focused on the water, and the woods. You definitely wear bright colors in the fall if you're walking! I guess threat would consist of someone taking your atv, not an armed home invasion type of assault. With increased population, I am sure the problems will eventually move north by the time I finally build something. as it is, I am thankful that most people don't even lock their doors, and any theft is mostly petty. Thank god I don't face the type of threat that it seems most of you do, moving to the country is supposed to get you away from that nonsense. Hope you all stay safe out there!,

Captain wine head
# Posted: 29 Aug 2012 19:54
Reply 


Another point just occurred to me, and that few have mentioned, is owning a good dog. I guess one reason I am so relaxed is that no one can come within 100 feet of my house or family without my dog warning them off. Often to the point where solicitors turn and leave. As you said ex sailor, if they keep coming they may mean harm, and his guarding instincts increase. In addition to a rifle, nothing beats a good dog!! He is sleeping at my feet as we speak, and follows the kids everywhere.

Borrego
Member
# Posted: 29 Aug 2012 21:27
Reply 


Quoting: Captain winehead
Agreed, I think I was surprised to see the subject of protection come up. Seemed out of place from my perspective. I grew up knowing that cabins are left unlocked, so anyone lost in the woods could find warmth, shelter and even food. It's how it always was.

Hey Captain, I figured right away it was just geography and you're lucky to live in such a safe place
Not that I would trade my less 'safe' environment for anything, I love it out there. It's just the wild west, as Neb said, and one needs to be careful, that's all. I think if you came for a visit you would see the need for some level of preparedness, but also love the beauty and remoteness of the place.
PS - I love this forum precisely because of posts like this where people of differing opinions can have discussions without becoming mean-spirited. Well done, all!

Captain winehead
# Posted: 29 Aug 2012 21:59
Reply 


Absolutely agree with you Borrego. Bigger game in the west, bigger fish, bigger and more beautiful scenery. Grizzlies as opposed to our little black bears which can be scared off by loud noises. But definitely a more beautiful environment, wilder if you will. I did not want to leave when we went there.

A whole different scenario with the issues in border towns in Texas, Arizona . California's supposedly full of crazies, but I would love to visit there too. Not sure how secure I would feel holed up in a cabin in death valley!!

groingo
Member
# Posted: 30 Aug 2012 17:12
Reply 


I have a most devisting weapon that simply scrambles the brains of any intruder, I have hanging outside a picture of my Sister In Law framed nicely by an old well used toilet seat....VERY SCAREY!

Captain Winehead
# Posted: 30 Aug 2012 18:30
Reply 


Nice !!

OwenChristensen
Member
# Posted: 30 Aug 2012 19:21
Reply 


I have a nephew and friends that I keep at bay with both dummy and real game cameras, along with an occasional refernce to a couple more than I actualy have.

Owen

Borrego
Member
# Posted: 31 Aug 2012 22:20
Reply 


Quoting: Captain winehead
A whole different scenario with the issues in border towns in Texas, Arizona . California's supposedly full of crazies,


Our place is only 40 miles from the border, midway between San Diego and Phoenix. Border Patrol agents get gunned down, US citizens pillaged and worse. If only the rest of America knew the real situation, it could get shut down really quick, our Gov't is not even trying! And not just the current guy but the one before him as well....

OwenChristensen
Member
# Posted: 1 Sep 2012 08:01
Reply 


I'm about a hundred miles south of the border. A poor economy, lack of work, a feeling of hopelessness. I'd like to try to sneek accross to the north...............If Canada would take me.

Owen

TomChum
Member
# Posted: 1 Sep 2012 11:12
Reply 


Owen, come build me a guest cabin, plus there's no neighbors for your shot to fall on

Sustainusfarm
Member
# Posted: 1 Sep 2012 15:42
Reply 


I just read the title and with my dirty mind you can imagine what I was thinking when I saw the word "protection" <snicker>

Bevis
Member
# Posted: 2 Sep 2012 15:56
Reply 


Quoting: Dillio187
I lost all my guns in a boating accident, who needs them anyways when the police are only 45 minutes away? :D

How far away is EMS and the Hospital ???

Dillio187
Member
# Posted: 2 Sep 2012 21:24
Reply 


you missed the extreme sarcasm emanating from my post ;)

OwenChristensen
Member
# Posted: 3 Sep 2012 19:33
Reply 


Tom I took a job at a small engine sales and repair shop. I do have a small building to build on a weekend soon, but I'll get 'er done for you.

Owen

mrmiji
Member
# Posted: 16 Sep 2012 21:42
Reply 


The US State Department likely felt that having Marines at embassies was "paranoid".

Anonymous
# Posted: 17 Sep 2012 07:53
Reply 


Yes we do have a right to protect ourselves and even if you live in a big city the police won't get there to help you soon enough if a home invasion is underway. However fireing a weapon in the air OUTSIDE your home to scare away unarmed teens( could have been one of yours) is illegal. To bad those kids didn't call the police.

AYP1909
Member
# Posted: 17 Sep 2012 13:15
Reply 


Quoting: exsailor
Actually I think being taught respect for guns is just a small part of it. There is the respect of life, property, self and others that seems to be sorely lacking in today's society.

Thank you; very well written.

TomChum
Member
# Posted: 17 Sep 2012 13:29 - Edited by: TomChum
Reply 


Quoting: exsailor
Actually I think being taught respect for guns is just a small part of it. There is the respect of life, property, self and others that seems to be sorely lacking in today's society.


Yes I agree, we are on a downhill slide. Here's one example of it. Of course I thought it was funny the first time I saw this sign, but now having kids it raises the question of what kind of manners are we going to be faced with from the next generation that we created?

It makes quite a difference to see this in real life when you're out exploring, a bit more effect than a pic on the internet.

Priv prop sign

OwenChristensen
Member
# Posted: 17 Sep 2012 20:49
Reply 


Anonomous, It's not against the law here to shoot outside your home. I don't live in the city. Heck, I even have a shooting range here. Also how would anyone know who is outside your window in the dark? I think you must be an inner city kid.
I don't get in sometimes Anonomous sides with me and sometimes he doesn't. LOL.

Owen

MtnDon
Member
# Posted: 17 Sep 2012 20:55
Reply 


Quoting: Anonymous
illegal.


"Illegal" varies depending where you are. It can also matter what the intent of firing is. Warning shots are always a bad idea IMO.

cottonpicker
# Posted: 20 Sep 2012 08:59
Reply 


Any weapon (Including a firearm) is an extension of power.

I want to be as "POWERFUL" as any situation demands.

A person can kill with their bare hands.

However, when 2 advisaries face off, one armed & one with only bare hands, who would you bet on

Last time I checked we only get to be on this Earth till we die.

There are no second chances.

I do not advocate violence but we live in a (Sometimes) violent World.

I just wanna be prepared for any eventuality.

I don't want my family or myself to die prematurely for lack of preparedness on my part.

Your thoughts??

<< . 1 . 2 . 3 . 4 . 5 . 6 . 7 . 8 . 9 . 10 . 11 . >>
Your reply
Bold Style  Italic Style  Underlined Style  Thumbnail Image Link  Large Image Link  URL Link           :) ;) :-( :confused: More smilies...

» Username  » Password 
Only registered users can post here. Please enter your login/password details before posting a message, or register here first.