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Small Cabin Forum / Off-Grid Living / Small Cabin Wood Stove Setup
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flatwater
Member
# Posted: 11 Dec 2009 22:18
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oops the start up didn't take, let try this again. well didn't do it again so the original cabin was 12x16 and I added a 16x20

Anonymous
# Posted: 23 Dec 2009 23:03
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Can't beat a good Shipmate Boat stove. Currently come in two sizes....The Skippy and the Model 211 (Has a small oven). We also have heat dissapating chimney collars (Deck irons) and chimney caps (Smoke hoods). New website coming verrry soon but have a few pictures at www.Shipmatestove.com or look for Shipmate Stove on eBay. Stay Warm!!
Sean Tracy

flatwater
Member
# Posted: 23 Dec 2009 23:29
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Anonymous.
I went to the site but found no prices and not a lot of info. Are they air tight and what are the price. Or is it , if I have to ask I don't have enough cash to buy one?

Moontreeranch
Member
# Posted: 24 Dec 2009 11:31
Reply 


The skippy lists at 590, with the enaled version coming it for 475 more...so just over a grand fro a little stove about the size of a toater oven...

these things are pretty small, you can see why they are popular with the boat crowd, if you can afford a boat then the extra grand for a stove is not much eh?

flatwater
Member
# Posted: 24 Dec 2009 21:09
Reply 


I think the largest one would be a great go to stove if one ran out of gas. I have a small monark but it takes a long time to get hot enough to cook with but I can see that the smaller stove would direct the heat better

Anonymous
# Posted: 26 Dec 2009 12:26
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The Skippy and 211 are not air tight and while they are indeed a bit on the higher end of the pricing scale, they have been entirely made and assembled in the US. We could offer them for 1/4 of that price if we headed to Asia for manufacturing but I just won't/can't do that. We are considering a price drop to $490 for the Skippy plain iron to get the ball rolling though. We have another small wood stove in the works which is more directed at very small residential spaces that is EPA certified and will start at $650. We're working away on the website and will have her up and running reeeeally soon!!

MikeOnBike
Member
# Posted: 27 Dec 2009 00:31
Reply 


I have a couple of cabins that I'm building next year that will be ~300 sqft. Is that in the target size of your 'very small residential spaces'?

I would think the 211 would work well for that size. The cabins will be well insulated with ~R30 floor/ceiling and ~R20 walls.

Anonymous
# Posted: 27 Dec 2009 18:15
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The new stove would be just right for that size space as we designed it to heat a space 150 sq.ft to 350 sq.ft depending on your insulation, airtightness and outside temp. The 211 would also work very well and you would have the added benefit of the oven. Here's some stove eye candy for you.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/43958887@N02/4044302571/sizes/o/

URL

flatwater
Member
# Posted: 29 Dec 2009 22:43
Reply 


A old trash burner seems to be what you could use. it's easy to cook on,their wall friendly, can be picked up cheap(check criags list) And can get one new for well under 1300 bucks. They use small wood. That's the plus. The minus is they don't hold a fire unless you shut it down some. If your cabin is well insulated it should work well.

MikeOnBike
Member
# Posted: 30 Dec 2009 00:05
Reply 


I have been watching craigslist. Not much there. Some really ugly monstrosities.
I agree a trash burner would probably work well. The cabin will be fairly well insulated. R30 floor/ceiling and R20 walls.

flatwater
Member
# Posted: 30 Dec 2009 20:35
Reply 


go to Washington State , town of Spokane and look under trash burner. One for 200 and three for 100. The one made by Wards looks pretty good I may check it out myself

lawnjocky
Member
# Posted: 31 Dec 2009 14:28
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I just made this one for a small trailer I am building. The stove measures 9"x9"x14". It has a 3"flue. Not shown are the air disk and the spring handle for the door. It is fully installed in the trailer now but I don't have a picture of it. I also fabricated a double wall roof jack using 3 and 4 inch exaust pipe I obtained from a muffler shop. The stove is made of 1/4 plate and on the wall side I have a 1/4" heat shield mounted 1 1/4" off the stove as well as the 1/8" stainless heatshiled on the wall.

Jocko

lawnjocky
Member
# Posted: 31 Dec 2009 14:37
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Opps, here are the pics.

Jocko
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flatwater
Member
# Posted: 31 Dec 2009 20:37
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I have some three inch double wall stove pipe but have been told three inch is not enough for proper draw if the fire is two large. How is yours working ?

lawnjocky
Member
# Posted: 1 Jan 2010 08:14
Reply 


It works geat. This stove is about the size of an ice fishing shack stove and they commonly had 3" flues. 3" double wall for gas fired appliances is common but the stuff for wood stoves is harder to find. The flashing I made had the curve of he trailer roof and was rigid so as to support the flue while the trailer is in motion. It extends about 8" into the interior. The flue pipe is single wall.

I'm in Montreal right now so I can't post additional pictures but I will when I get back.

Jocko

elkdiebymybow
Member
# Posted: 11 Jan 2010 15:08
Reply 


There are several small stoves used for sheep hearder tents that might work in a small cabin application. Cabella's sells a few and you may want to check out their site. I have gone hunting in late October with sub-zero temperatures and the small stoves have been a blessing. There isn't any insulation in a canvas tent so I'd imagine they would work well in a small cabin. Our cabin has a stove that we can open up and enjoy as a fireplace. good luck!
wood stove
wood stove


Hunter12
Member
# Posted: 14 Jan 2010 12:01
Reply 


I did much the same only I used concrete board(4ftx4ft) with 2 inches between. It was mounted to the wall behind the stove. I then hung a 2 foot wide piece of flashing on the wall for the hot portion of the stove pipe. The wall behind is always cool.

lawnjocky
Member
# Posted: 27 Jan 2010 18:01
Reply 


Here is my stove set up. Under the stove I have 12 x 12 pavers on sleepers. Behind the stove I have wonder board going all the way up the wall. Right behind the stove are cinderblocks held in place by thinset. The blocks and pavers are set up so there is air flow from the front of the paver to the top of the blocks. This system works great. Eventually I will tile it with some Mexican tiles.

Jocko
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dk1393
Member
# Posted: 27 Jan 2010 20:19
Reply 


That is a great spot to put the cast iron pans. I think I will borrow your idea

CabinBuilder
Admin
# Posted: 27 Jan 2010 23:21
Reply 


Interesting solution with air flowing through the hollow cinder blocks!

lawnjocky
Member
# Posted: 28 Jan 2010 17:03
Reply 


Thanks. The cinder block and paver idea was cheap, fast and it works great.

Jocko

toyota_mdt_tech
Member
# Posted: 28 Feb 2010 18:58
Reply 


Has anyone ever entertained the idea of that concrete backerboard for behind a woodstove for fire protection?

larry
Member
# Posted: 28 Feb 2010 22:34
Reply 


the stuff works great. it makes a great thermal barrier

MikeOnBike
Member
# Posted: 28 Feb 2010 22:55
Reply 


I might use that and some corrugated metal roofing with a 1" air gap from the wall. That will allow me minimum clearance for my stove in a tiny cabin.

lawnjocky
Member
# Posted: 1 Mar 2010 16:36
Reply 


See the pics above, that is what is bhind the cinder blocks and cast iron pans.

Jocko

Sphinx
# Posted: 21 May 2010 00:19
Reply 


Nice, Jocko! I can't see the bottom of the cinder block stack...do you have it sitting on the pavers or up off the floor to get an air gap?

CabinBuilder
Admin
# Posted: 18 Jun 2010 15:16
Reply 


It was brought to my attention by one of website visitors that the metal sheeting around the stove looks like galvanized, and outgassed zinc is poisonous.

Yes, the wood stove heat shield is made of galvanized steel, and I was not aware of the potential toxicity.
From what I can gather, the galvanized steel is suitable for high-temperature applications of up to 392 F (200 C) [Wikipedia]. Therefore, I am removing the shield around the stove (leaving just cinder bricks), but leaving sheeting at the wall (that does not get nearly as hot).

medic29
# Posted: 20 Jul 2010 21:00
Reply 


Quoting: CabinBuilder
I used regular firewood most of the time, but before going to bed I put one of those artificial logs that last several hours. I love them - they burn steady and I don't have to get up at night often to put another one...


I'm curious aobut the "artificial logs" you talked about....can you tell me more? The stove I have in our cabin works great, but getting up every 3 hours to put more wood in it gets really old...and if I don't get up...it's awfully cold in the morning.

larry
Member
# Posted: 20 Jul 2010 22:13
Reply 


medic29
check with the stove maker, most modern EPA approved wood stoves don't take well to artificial logs.

medic29
# Posted: 20 Jul 2010 23:30
Reply 


maybe a stupid question....what is an artificial log?

I have no idea who my stove maker is...and I may end up making my own stove so that it holds more wood...so I don't have to get up during the night. lol

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