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Small Cabin Forum / Off-Grid Living / Small Cabin Wood Stove Setup
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tbjohn
Member
# Posted: 5 Jan 2012 15:55
Reply 


Oh, I also would think that that stove could be installed in a half a day. Especially with a couple people. That is assuming you have all the stuff onhand....trips to the hardware stove from camp always take time.

kenl
# Posted: 8 Jan 2012 17:34
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I like the blocks around the stove, good for heat storage also. Have seen where people have used large stones the same way for better heat storage.

kenny

turkeyhunter
Member
# Posted: 8 Jan 2012 17:48
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i have a FISHER papa bear ( 4o bucks ;-) " with the evergreen trees on the door---that i am gong to use in my new camp. Have not decided where to locate it in the cabin---i cut a cardbord template to use , and try to figure out where i want it. I want TN stackstone on the floor and walls. Kinda like to put stove pipe ( triple wall) through the wall. I hate to cut my green metal roof.

Litawyn
Member
# Posted: 10 Feb 2012 14:38
Reply 


Quoting: Anonymous
Are there dealers or distributors of Hobbit Stoves in Canada?



It appears you can now have one shipped directly from the UK to either the US or Canada:

http://www.belltent.biz/products/8/105/the_hobbit_stove_uscanada/


Litawyn

martym
Member
# Posted: 10 Feb 2012 15:58
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The Hobbit is also selling on ebay now. For just a few bucks more.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Small-Multi-Fuel-Wood-Burning-Stove-Hobbit-Boat-Home-Cabin-Wo od-Stove-/310377417663?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash

Mine should be here in a few weeks. I will post a review if any one is interested.

davestreck
Member
# Posted: 10 Feb 2012 20:11 - Edited by: davestreck
Reply 


I just picked up the perfect stove for my cabin:



Vintage (and apparently unused!) 19th C. "Russia Iron" stove. Found it at Antique Stove Hospital. Wicked nice guy, TONS of stoves. His shop is straight out of "American Pickers", including the all-original '32 Ford pickup covered in dust in the back corner:



Best thing about the stove is how light it is. The base, door and top are cast iron, but the body is sheet "Russia Iron" (Google it). The whole thing weighs less than 50 pounds, which will be a huge bonus when we carry it up to the cabin.

I love the Hobbit stove too. That would have been my choice if I hadn't found this one.

martym
Member
# Posted: 11 Feb 2012 08:21
Reply 


Great looking stove Dave! Congrats on the score.

I was trying to guess at the size of the stove by looking at the flue, is that a 4 or 6 inch flue opening?

davestreck
Member
# Posted: 11 Feb 2012 10:23
Reply 


Quoting: martym
I was trying to guess at the size of the stove by looking at the flue, is that a 4 or 6 inch flue opening?


Its a 5 inch opening. The whole stove is about 18" wide by 13" deep (the door is actually on the right hand side of the stove) and its about 34" from floor to the top of the decorative casting on the hinged top.

martym
Member
# Posted: 11 Feb 2012 12:04
Reply 


Have you found a good source for the odd ball pipe size?
I spent a LOT of time online looking for 4 inch stove pipe and fittings before I bought my Hobbit.

https://www.harperhardwareandtools.com/plumbing-heating-supplies/pipe-stove-furnace-c himney.html

Harper had every thing I needed to get me from the 4 inch draft on the stove to the 6 inch double wall that I can find locally. I think I remember seeing 5 inch as well. If you have another source I would be interested.

Oxsdad
# Posted: 13 Feb 2012 00:34
Reply 


I am interested in the Hobbit also but can't find any info on size of the firebox or length of wood it will take. Any info would be greatly appreciated.

turkeyhunter
Member
# Posted: 13 Feb 2012 08:46 - Edited by: turkeyhunter
Reply 


dave--fine looking stove!!!!

btw--looked at the website for Antique Stove Hospital. --i like to spend a 1/2 day there one day---!!!!

Martian
Member
# Posted: 13 Feb 2012 09:15
Reply 


What I like best about my Morso 1440 is that it is a convection stove. That means it easily is fitted into my small space. The side clearance requirement is only 8". I'm heating 500 square feet of insulated space with 8' ceilings. It takes 11" logs and burns for 3-5 hours on a load depending on how cold it is outside. I keep it around 75F inside the house.
http://www.morsona.com

Bob in AR
Member
# Posted: 22 Feb 2012 12:44
Reply 


Quoting: TomChum
I doubt they ship stoves to Canada.

Salamander Stove UK dealers DO ship to the US. am interested to know any Canadian or US users with experience either Pipsqueak or Hobbit. In particular, what size wood fuel do they take, size of firebox, can't get straight answer from mfr. thanks, Bob in Arkansas

martym
Member
# Posted: 22 Feb 2012 21:54
Reply 


I just got my Hobbit the other day. Ordered it off ebay. I am really impressed with the build quality and performance so far. The casting, and fit and finish of parts are top notch.I was a little concerned that the small size of the stove might put it into a toy category, not so at all. The stove is very solid and weighs in over 100lbs nice thick casting, lots of mass for its foot print. A ll the features of a full size stove just scaled way down in size.

I don't have my cabin ready for the wood stove yet so I hooked it up in my shop to give it a test drive. Both doors have quality hinges no sagging when there open. Also a slick latch for both that really seat the doors well. I gave them the dollar bill test and nearly tore the bill trying to pull it out. Both the primary and secondary air intakes are smooth operating and easy to use. I had no problem lighting a fire and within just a minute or 2 the stove was drawing well enough that I could open the door with zero smoke spillage. This is huge! My shop stove is terrible about smoke spilling into the room when I open the door to feed it. With my tiny cabin space even a little smoke would be a problem.

As for fire box and wood size. The door opening is 7 1/4 x 8 1/4 inches the fire box is 9 inches deep front to back. I heat my house and shop with wood and I am a avid wood worker, so I have lots of wood lying around to choose from. Once you have a good bed of coals I found that 3 splits stacked give the best burn. I could get about 2 1/2 hours out of some good dry Ash. I think I will be cutting my Hobbit wood about 6 or 7 inches long and splitting it into 3x3 wedges that seemed to be the easiest size to load. You could go longer on some, but the fire box is tapered in the back and 9 inch splits wont fit up towards the top of the box.

No buyers remorse here. If you need a stove for a small space I don't think you will be disappointed.

PDK73
Member
# Posted: 26 Feb 2012 01:24
Reply 


Hi, I built a small (100 sqft) cabin and had similar problems as other posters looking for a wood heating solution. Eventually, I just built my own small stove. Mainly out of 1/4 inch plate, with a four inch stack and conventional chimney I found on kijiji for $40. It burns cleanly at proper operating temps and uses little wood. Left alone it will burn down in about 3 hrs. I don't damp it down, have a window cracked at all times and have functioning CO/smoke detector. It is doable to go the DIY route provided you respect clearances and stick to code
Wood Stove 1
Wood Stove 1
Wood Stove 2
Wood Stove 2
Wood Stove 3
Wood Stove 3
Wood Stove 4
Wood Stove 4


analogmanca
Member
# Posted: 26 Feb 2012 11:37 - Edited by: analogmanca
Reply 


PDK73,
Well done!, even a top baffel plate. I am wondering where is the water heating coil? the slide out ashbox?
Yes, stick to codes,.....always.

PDK73
Member
# Posted: 26 Feb 2012 21:27
Reply 


Thanks, I didn't incorporate a heating coil or water jacket because I think that for occasional use a pot of water on top is more practical, both from a cleaning and a safety stand point. As a steamfitter I can assure you that the last thing you want in a tiny space is a failed pressure releif valve. Also, complete emptying is needed when you leave do to freeze up and corrosion. I did consider an ash drawer, but wood burns best on a flat insulated surface (fire brick) rather than on a grate (better for a multifuel stove). The stove only accumulates about a half inch of ash a week which only takes a minute to shovel out. The only things I might consider if I built a second one would be an oven on top and preheated secondary air to the combustion chamber (I get a clean burn but efficiency might be improved).

analogmanca
Member
# Posted: 26 Feb 2012 23:50
Reply 


I was kidding about the water coil, and ash box.I have to learn to use the smilies..

TomChum
Member
# Posted: 27 Feb 2012 11:04
Reply 


Cool stove, good job.
Is there a reason you didn't put a window?

TomChum
Member
# Posted: 27 Feb 2012 11:04
Reply 


Quoting: davestreck
"Russia Iron" stove


That's a cool stove!

PDK73
Member
# Posted: 27 Feb 2012 15:20
Reply 


Thanks, Tom I didn't add a window for a few reasons: cost for the tempered glass, the opening is pretty small (4x6 inches), but mainly because I found when running a small radiant propane heater in the cabin early on that in such a small space it seemed very bright once my eyes adjusted to the dark (it kept me up). Also I built a preheat baffle into the door that heats the incoming air (maybe) and adds turbulence, so no room left in a tiny door for a window.
Wood stove door
Wood stove door


analogmanca
Member
# Posted: 7 Mar 2012 13:40
Reply 


PDK73,
For glass at a dirt cheap price try Princess Auto. I just picked up 2 pieces. Each new piece(1400 degree glass) was 5 dollars. They have lots in stock. I think you shop there by the other things seen in your pic.

PDK73
Member
# Posted: 7 Mar 2012 23:15
Reply 


Thanks, I saw it on sale in the flyer this week. No plans to build another stove but for a couple of bucks each I'll probably stockpile some

TomChum
Member
# Posted: 8 Mar 2012 00:04 - Edited by: TomChum
Reply 


OK yes I see your baffle.
Quoting: PDK73
I found when running a small radiant propane heater in the cabin early on that in such a small space it seemed very bright once my eyes adjusted to the dark (it kept me up).

I have a MrHeater Little Buddy 9,000BTU, it seems at least 5x as bright as my woodstove, and it'sa steady bright. I like a flickering stove though. I would not HAVE a stove with "no window".

I also have a Big Buddy (the double). I need a lot of heat to get the logs warm, but once warm they hold it for a long time.

PDK73
Member
# Posted: 8 Mar 2012 21:29
Reply 


Hi Tom, I agree that being able watch the fire is nice (and handy for feeding purposes). If I'd found some cheap glass at the time I'm sure I would have added a window (it would only be about 3x3 inches though!). I think of this stove a more of a utilitarian heater/cooker and in such a tiny space there's really no room to gather around it and enjoy a fire. I figured that since I sit out by a camp fire most nights in the evening I would get my fire watching that way. I did make a steel screen that clips in with the door open for a fireplace effect but haven't had much desire to use it

neb
Member
# Posted: 8 Mar 2012 22:24
Reply 


PDK73
great looking stove

CaliGrlInWV
Member
# Posted: 5 Apr 2012 08:41
Reply 


Wondering if anyone has tried using ammo cans. I found this video on YouTube http://youtu.be/KHDDl9cuRDU

CaliGrlInWV
Member
# Posted: 5 Apr 2012 09:02
Reply 


I just did a search on google and found this company that is actually making these in Virginia. They look very slick ... http://www.ammocanstove.com/index.html

CabinBuilder
Admin
# Posted: 5 Apr 2012 11:01 - Edited by: CabinBuilder
Reply 


Quite novel idea, but:

1). Woodstoves are usually made from a special kind of steel which is capable of withstanding high temperatures. I don't know but doubt this type of steel is used in ammo cans. Not to mention the metal thickness.
2). The manufacturer indicates galvanized pipe is used for the chimney. Galvanized steel is suitable for applications under 392 F (200 C), otherwise it emits outgassed zinc vapors which are poisonous.

I'd stick with woods stoves made of more suitable materials.
Just my 2 cents.

TomChum
Member
# Posted: 5 Apr 2012 13:03 - Edited by: TomChum
Reply 


Carbon steel will burn, at high temperatures, in fact with enough oxygen it will burn hot enough to sustain it's own fire. That is how an oxy-acetylene cutting torch works. Once you get the steel hot enough (with a steady hand) sometimes the flame goes out but you can continue to cut the steel with only raw oxygen.

That said, many safe stoves are made from plate steel (which is carbon steel) , but it's always thick enough that it still has some strength even when cherry red. I would be worried about a thin steel stove getting cherry red because it could turn orange then yellow in just a moment, and if it gets a hole then it will burn and you can't shut the air off at that point. Luckily for their poor safety-factor, the ammo can stoves can't hold a lot of fuel.

Cast Iron is good for stoves, because cast iron does not burn. But if overheated, or too thin, it can crack, and let the fire spill out onto the floor. A heavy cast iron stove is safer than a lightweight (for easier delivery) cast iron stove. Few people know the difference between cast iron and steel plate.

I would not put an ammo can stove in a wood structure, because it doesn't have any safety factors towards mis-use. If you can't let your stove go un-tended for 15 minutes it's not a good thing to put a fire in, in your house. Building a fire inside a wood house is already risky, don't compound the problem. I'd say that ammo can stove looks good for outdoor use, like in a hunting tent, where the woods outside are wet or snowy. And it's lightweight, easy to transport.

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