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Small Cabin Forum / Off-Grid Living / Small Cabin Wood Stove Setup
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CabinBuilder
Admin
# Posted: 21 Jul 2010 11:04
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Quoting: medic29
I'm curious about the "artificial logs" you talked about..


They are made using petrochemicals.
Some manufacturers claim they burn cleaner than wood... Not sure about emissions etc, but I did noticed they tend to clog the chimney.

There are few varieties available at home supply stores and large grocery stores. They usually cost ~$4 each (in bulk, 6).
For example, this.

RnR
Member
# Posted: 6 Aug 2010 13:48
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Hey we tried some artificial logs on occasion, these were compressed wood that came in bags of about 12 from Rona hardware store. I think they were the house brand. They burned hotter than real logs so you can't put too many in at once, but they also gave off a smell that we weren't crazy about. The ashes they left behind were also different, more like the kinds of ashes paper leaves behind. I would say they're OK in a pinch but not what I would rely on most of the time.
R&R.

Hope
Member
# Posted: 1 Oct 2010 15:32
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Check out the stoves on Anonymous' site. They are expensive, but created especially for tiny spaces and they are efficient burners, which means they are safer than less efficient stoves...less chance of suffocation or fumes. They are Navigator Stoves and are tiny, attractive (you can get them in colors), and they make one with an oven. Check their room size heating ability, or you might make your tiny house into a tiny oven... :O)
Looks like you could pick up fallen branches to use in these. Every time I go outdoors, I see wood lying around, wishing I had one already in use...I want the one with the oven for our main room and maybe the tiniest for our bedroom....

fairy-mother
# Posted: 8 Nov 2010 04:41
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Hello!

I am new to the subject of stoves & woodburners etc. I have been looking around the internet for some advice, and this looks like a really great place.

I am not fitting out a cabin, so much as my home.. but it is a very small cottage in a national park outside exeter in devon, UK.

As happens with pretty much everything i buy these days, I look around the internet first for some advice.

The room I am going to put the burner in is approx 8m x 8m with a low ceiling. It is open plan into a TINY kitchen, and the stairway goes up the side to the bedrooms upstairs (no door) I am hoping the heat will go all the way up to the bedrooms also. We already have a small fireplace, but I'm hoping to have the burner in the room, with an 'exhaust' going up the (freshly swept) chimney.

I was wondering if anyone here had experience with any smallish stoves in the UK? Any tips on where to begin?

I will keep you all informed of my progress!

fairy-mother
# Posted: 9 Nov 2010 13:46
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I have been told i need a 5Kw stove, as after my husband measured the room it wasn't as big as i thought. oops.

fairy-mother
# Posted: 10 Nov 2010 02:59
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OK, next step - call Charnwood - i like the look of their stoves.

fairy-mother
# Posted: 14 Nov 2010 11:27
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Wow. A big weekend of looking at Cast Iron (and some not!) Stoves. What I will say is it is quite hard to visualize a stove actually being lit and 'alive' when you are stood in a room full of stoves. Also, they all look kind of the same after a while. I'm still keen on Morso now mind.

I am going to have to make a call soon, we are getting cold with a big gap where a fire should be.

Here are a a few pics of what I am starting with.



another view



and where, HOPEFULLY the smoke is going to come out



My aim is to get a stove installed within two weeks. more pics to follow.

fairy-mother
# Posted: 14 Nov 2010 11:43
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starting to feel like i talk to myself here! I'm cross posting with other forums for moral support!

Just keeping you in the loop, because this is the first site I started reading about small stoves on!

hattie
Member
# Posted: 14 Nov 2010 11:48
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fairy-mother: I love the look of British homes...Do you have any other pics (outside/inside)? How old is your home?

MtnDon
Member
# Posted: 14 Nov 2010 13:18
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I've been watching but quiet as I know nothing about what stoves are available in the UK.

bobrok
Member
# Posted: 14 Nov 2010 17:50
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Is there somebody here who can speak to the difference between cast iron and plate steel wood stoves. I've heard that cast iron will crack, but I still see them sold all over. Are they cheaper than steel?

MtnDon
Member
# Posted: 14 Nov 2010 18:11
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Cast iron is very durable if treated right. That begins with properly breaking in the stove with multiple small fires with a complete cool down in between. It also means buying a stove that was properly cast. We've had nothing but cast iron stoves since the first one we bought from Vermont Castings back in the early 80's. There's never been a problem with them. A good cast iron stove should last forever. Cast iron also look better to my eye, when the maker has taken time to create detailed molds, curved panels and so on..

A plate stove should last as well as long as the steel plate is thick enough and as long as it is welded right. They have a break in too I believe, but I've never owned one.

Triva. Back in the 80's at least every VC stove was first made in wood, that was then used to make the molds for casting.

fairy-mother
# Posted: 15 Nov 2010 10:30
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Hi Hattie,

I don't really want to post up pictures of my cottage, I'm a little wary of the internet like that. but I can tell you my place is over 300 years old, and takes a lot of upkeep. (some parts are approx 500 years old, It looks like it has been rebuilt many times)

As for Cast Iron vs Plate Steel, all the people in the shops I spoke to over the weekend said go for Cast Iron. Keep the heat better? Also, from my point of view they look better.

Finally, I am thinking about getting a Morso Squirrel. (way over my budget, but this is the problem with research I find, once I start looking into something, I want the very best!) It happened with computers, which is why I now have a Mac.

hattie
Member
# Posted: 15 Nov 2010 12:21
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fairy-mother: Your place sounds lovely. I am always amazed at the age of places in the UK. If something is 100 years old here, it is considered very old...In the UK 100 is still just a toddler. *S*

bobrok
Member
# Posted: 15 Nov 2010 13:28
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Quoting: MtnDon
Cast iron is very durable if treated right...It also means buying a stove that was properly cast...A good cast iron stove should last forever.


Thanks for sharing, MtnDon. I'll probably have more questions later on but I want to read up a bit more on the subject first.

Have you ever heard of Logwood brand stoves? Opinions?

MtnDon
Member
# Posted: 15 Nov 2010 16:07
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Never heard of it. Sorry.

larryh
Member
# Posted: 15 Nov 2010 19:21
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Morso is a high quality stove. It was the best of the two rather expensive stoves I purchased new. While it did an adequate job, I just found the small wood the new ones take as well as the insulation on nearly all sides to be a detriment to heat into the home. If you can put a stove 4 inches from a wall you know your not getting any heat from those sides! So I prefer my old stove any day.. But if your in a situation where your not able or don't want to find a high quality older stove, and considering your set up I would say you need one with all that rear insulation for sure, then the Morso is a fine product.

MtnDon
Member
# Posted: 15 Nov 2010 19:32
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4 inches, Larry. No wonder you said you couldn't get much heat from it!!! My Aspen requires 24" side and 13 inches rear which makes sense as the sides run up to 335+ F when it's draft is open. Front top reads up to 700 F.

MikeOnBike
Member
# Posted: 15 Nov 2010 19:37
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Quoting: MtnDon
24" side and 13 inches rear


Is that the required clearance with a side or rear wall surface that has the 1" air gap?

MtnDon
Member
# Posted: 15 Nov 2010 20:15
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Noi, Mike that is the distance from unprotected surfaces and no extra heat shields. That's 24" to sides, 13" to rear and 13" to rear corners when placed diagonally.

Using protected wall surfaces, like the 1" air gap between sheet metal and the combustible wall behind it drops to 16" sides, 9" rear and 8" to corners when placed diagonally.

The rear clearance can be reduced to as little as 7" and 8" diagonally if a heat shield is added to the rear of the stove (a factory option kit) and double wall heat shielding is added to the stove pipes.

VC has all their installation materials available for download online. I downloaded a lot of manuals from a lot of makers while trying to decide what stove was best for our cabin. I'm quite happy with VC, so much we're repeat customers since the early 80's.

fairy-mother
# Posted: 22 Nov 2010 06:29
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Hi Everybody

I'm back. And I have found a Stove from a company here in Devon! I think the stove must be new to the market because I can't find out much about it. I really like the look of the stove also, not a million miles away from the Squirrel I like so much.


does anybody know anything about Salamander Stoves? I'm going to call them up today and see if I can visit, but I'd like to be armed with a little info from you people in the know first if possible??

fingers crossed this is the one for me - the price is right (425) and I'm cold now. getting fed up of looking.

fairy-mother
# Posted: 2 Dec 2010 06:49
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So in the end I went down to Salamander Stoves in Newton Abbot.

I met Mark, one of the designers of the Stove (lovely bloke by the way, endless cups of tea!) I pretty much decided on the spot that I wanted The Hobbit (so cute looking!)

We chatted about fitting it and he worked out a shopping list of flue components for me that I picked up from www.fluesystems.com

I took the stove home and started the process of ringing around. I soon found out that nobody could fit it until AFTER CHRISTMAS!!!
Much begging took place and in the end Mark came over to fit the stove (Bless Him, he is very busy, and said don't put it on the internet that I fit woodburners, I've got enough to do already - ooooops!!)



here it is after I just lit it - it draws really well, keeps the place toasty (even though I could have put a bigger burner 'in the hole' this one really keeps us warm, we love it)

Here is a picture of the boring bit, as I know this forum has some proper professional stove folk on it. Don't ask me any questions about this side of the operation. Sorry for being a bit girlie about it!!



finally, I really should do this for Mark & the Salamander Stove people, you can buy a Hobbit Stove Here!

Oh yes - it is an import, but Mark has been involved in the full design & build process. To quote him 'People love iPads and say they are amazing quality - they are from China as well!' for 425 I couldn't find anything to come near it for quality - the Morso would have left me broke, and with Christmas coming up I just couldn't reach that far - plus I LOVE MY HOBBIT!

larryh
Member
# Posted: 7 Dec 2010 19:13
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It looks fine and I would guess that it is sufficient for the size space your using.

Larry

Anonymous
# Posted: 11 Jun 2011 19:07
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Are there dealers or distributors of Hobbit Stoves in Canada?

TomChum
Member
# Posted: 13 Jun 2011 01:07
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Quoting: Anonymous
Are there dealers or distributors of Hobbit Stoves in Canada?


These would be great for a small cabin. But have a look at their website http://www.salamanderstoves.com/ They are in the UK and only have about 6 dealers. I doubt they ship stoves to Canada.

CabinBuilder
Admin
# Posted: 16 Aug 2011 10:26 - Edited by: CabinBuilder
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Wood stove manufacturers [1],[2] were mentioned in other threads.

Malamute
Member
# Posted: 16 Aug 2011 12:41
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I've used the old fashioned metal roof thimbles for cheap stove installations, they actually work fairly well, but as was mentioned, don't have the extra insulation to resist a chimney fire. As an example, I had a box stove running about out of control in a high wind, the single wall stove pipe was turning red above the pipe a ways, and the stove was installed with a metal roof thimble. I was concerned about the roof getting hot around the pipe (unfinished ceiling, just the roof sheathing that the timble/stove pipe went thru), I could lay my hand on the metal thimble, just 3 feet above the red hot part of the pipe. I think insulated pipe thru ceilings and roof is a good idea, but the old style thimbles can work for shops and part time places is insurance isn't an issue. I wouldnt get a stove running at full tilt with one tho.

I've made heat shields for stove installs. I did one with a metal backer, cut at the local metal shop, then attached it to a sheetrock wall with ceraminc insulators from the hardwares tore, them screwed cement baord to it, and the owners tiled it. Came out very nice. It made reduced clearance specs for code and insurance. They went with double wall pipe for closer clearance there.

In my little 14x18 cabin, I've used up the air before a number of times with the wood stove, I made a fresh air intake with 3" pipe to the crawl space and screened it there. It connected directy to the air intake of my Earth Stove, but you could probably make an intake that would provide fresh air right next to your stoves intake if it wasn't set up for a tight connection. You could put a damper in it to control cold air ingress.

In all the stoves I've doen the past few years, I put double dampers in, even with the Earth Stove. Being a high wind area, it can help keep a stove from running out of control. I rarely use the double, but am gald when i do need it. We get winds in excess of 120 mph at times, 80 isnt that unusual in winter and spring. I learned that trick after having the box stove go nearly critical.

Keeping a fire extinguisher near the stove (but not so near you cant get it in case of emergency) you can often stop a chimney fire. A firefighter I know say they open the stove door and shoot the extinguisher into the stove and it draws up the pipe.

trollbridge
Member
# Posted: 16 Aug 2011 13:25
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Here is our woodstove. The cabin is 12x16 and a small fire is all that is needed. Our son built a woodstove for his ice shack and we said "perfect...build us one please." It is not code but we didn't care cause our cabin is suppose to just be an accessory building-otherwise we could not build a cabin that small where we are. We keep a fire extinguisher in the cabin.
Homemade woodstove
Homemade woodstove


Anonymous
# Posted: 26 Sep 2011 11:27
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Hi I'm trying to find a solution to reduce wall clearances, without adding a lot of weight (ie/ brick), as my cabin is on a trailer frame and needs to stay fairly lightweight. I was thinking that because using insulated stove pipe can bring my pipe clearances from 18" to more like 2", that maybe I could find/make a similarly insulated heat shield to reduce wall clearances. Could something like this reduce clearances more than two layers of metal with air gap, or is the air gap an essential part of how that system works? Thoughts/ ideas?

trollbridge
Member
# Posted: 26 Sep 2011 14:24 - Edited by: trollbridge
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In our "big" cabin we put up sheetrock first. Then steel studs with that cement board over it to create an airspace. We left that up off the ground a little too. Over that we put galvanized tin also leaving that up a bit from the bottom. We also needed to stay as lightweight as possible otherwise I would have done stone top to bottom.

All clearances for our stove were met doing this.
Here is our wood stove.
Here is our wood stove.


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